TacticallySharp

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About TacticallySharp

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

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  • Website URL
    http://tacticallysharp.com
  • Skype
    george.brackett

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hialeah, FL
  • Interests
    Apprentice Bladesmith, started 2011 October by attending Haywood CC -ABS Intro to Bladesmithing. Met David the Master Blacksmith for the College and he showed me how much more there is to Blacksmithing. That has awaken a desire to learn more about the Blacksmithing art.

    I am retired, a NRA Certified Firearms Instructor and I enjoy photography.

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  1. Grandpa does what he has to do... I promised my grandkids they could forge their own knives at the age of 10. One is there this summer, and the other next year. I got them a hammer with their names on them to start with...
  2. Very nice knife. One lucky brother in law. I've made knives for my brothers in laws, and my son in law. Lots of fun to see the smile on their faces when they received them... Made some of these for my sister' too!
  3. A lot depends on how the user wants to hold it. Go buy a couple 7 to10 chef knives at wally world, and ask her to try them for a few days each. Then based on her anwser make one the mades what she likes. I find that edge needs to start about a 1/4" below the spine, down to about 0° at the cutting edge. I then grind the edge off and create a micro bevel. Then sharpen it on both sides. That has worked for me in the past in 85% of the times. This one has a 10 inch blade, and a 6.5 inch hand. Plent of space on the handle to safely use it for all cutting need. A country styled with a forced patina to show and aged knife so his clients would see what their eyes said was an old cowboy cooking tool. Great for cutting meat, and veggies with just a cleaning and applying som vegetable oil.
  4. I forge a bevel, ricaso, and the handle on mine. If there is a taper I forge it too. I forge 90% to the finished dimensions. I leave the knife edge at the thickness of a nickel when taking it to critical temperture, and for the quenching process. Sand it down to a dime before tempering. I also use Parks 50 as my quenching oil. On my stock removal knives that are thin, less than 1/8," I leave them flat, and grind after the total hardeness, and tempering rocess. Especially kitchen knives. This has worked for me very well with all the high carbon steels I normally use. 1080,1084,1085,1075, 5160. Remember that 1080, and 1084 are very forgiving steels to harden and temper.
  5. Check the ABS YouTube channel. They have Good information!!!
  6. I've purchase a lot from them In the pass 7 years. Nover had a problem with them. Great service and,friendly folks
  7. I did it once.with blue steel avable in today's market not worth the time.
  8. I've used 8ncrv2 it is an enhanced 5160. I get mine from NJ Steel Baron. More carbon than 5160 and some other stuff. NJSB has a spec sheet on there site.
  9. I use 9 pices of 1084 steel one on each and two in the middle. The 15N20 is 2 layers on side between the outside one and the inside two of 1084. 6" long pieces for me works vest.
  10. I would use G10 and that would waterproof it for use in the kitchen.
  11. Make a drop point. Great utility and hunting blade style. Hammer what you think is the edge. The point of the top of the knife will be fromedthis large knife was made this way. Makes a greatt hunter with a 3.78" blade.
  12. I would use G10 liners and corby bolts to beef up the stabilized burl. Also use GFlex epoxy. While slow to cure it has some of the best adhesion properties I've found to date.
  13. I'm both a buyer, and a maker. I have sold knives from my website, in store display, Facebook, and word of mouth. Most of my clients refer others to me. I try to make my products as finish looking as possible. If I put my mark on it, it's the best I can make. Most of my work is sold by the time I post it. If I see the problem, I fix it. If it can't be fixed it goes into my oops box. If later it can be corrected it will become a gift for the family.
  14. This is in the realm of our 5160 state side. Just a little tougher it seems. You can make just about any knife with the correct heat treat procedure. It would really be good for large choppers and hard use edged tools. A mountain bowie would be a nice choice for it. I like this style.
  15. I use GFlex marine epoxy as my adhesive, and small Corby Bolts for mechanical attachment. On kitchen knives I prefer stabilised wood or man made materials for my handles. I use the same on most of my other knives too.