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I Forge Iron

MilwaukeeJon

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About MilwaukeeJon

  • Rank
    Senior Member

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  • Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Interests
    Historic trades, especially woodworking and now blacksmithing.,

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  1. Perfect. One thing I learned on this project is that the finer grit grinding can lead to small delaminations if you aren't careful. These small flaws were easy to remove with slower/cooler grinding but it did make me take notice about being more careful in the future.
  2. Very nice indeed....is that pattern on both sides or just the front?
  3. Very cool. What was your folding/design approach here....some twisting and channels cuts involved?
  4. Who knew this little thing would generate such a discussion!
  5. This anvil is not "hollow"....it simply is "solidity challenged".
  6. Awww....the poor old thing! If nothing else, it can hold up my coffee cup out in the shop.
  7. Thanks Thomas....its a freebie so I'll find some use for it.
  8. Can any folks here help me with identification on this one, which is being given to me by a friend. What is with the track for a rail on the back?
  9. My Pig would love to meet yours! This stand, which appears to be original, has 1/2" deep mortises for the feet.
  10. Great job on that blade and sheath.
  11. I hadn't thought of it that way! Good fish mouth?
  12. This time I did 18 layers (the original stack was 9). Interesting to see how the raindrop pattern dissolves into something more abstract in these lower layer knives. I’m very aware of losing some of the outer layers while hammering (oxidizing loss) and grinding/sanding. Lacewood scales. Interestingly, another fish face appeared on one of the sides out at the tip....second time this has happened!
  13. Learned a lot from #1 so I quickly made another (back one in top pic, left one in bottom). Added 4 oz. of weight to bring it up to 20 oz, and made a tighter and more uniformly radiused curve on the bit for more precise spoon and bowl carving (by the way, that is not a chip on the larger blade, but rather some wood residue from chopping). The newer, larger adze has more beef in the neck as well and overall feels more efficient and powerful, and less inclined to bounce off of the timber.
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