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I Forge Iron

plough harrow as a forge base?


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Hi, Im new to the hobby, thinking of making a forge from a 2' diamater plough disk

It is about 1/4 of an inch thick

I have a never ending supply of these 

What do you think??

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Sure, it could work as a forge base. What type of forge are you planning to make for what fuel? Also what type of things do you plan to forge?

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They're about the same dimensions a rivet Forge. I've seen pictures of harrow disc forges but haven't used one. Seems like it would work fine for coal. You'll need a ducks nest for a firepot though. 

Pnut

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I've seen a couple different styles is why I asked. Larger slightly domed, ones with the "nubs" on the outside, and some have a deeper domed section at the center where they bolt on. Might be different animals but just was trying to clear up the guess work. The kind I have would work as a forge table if a forge pot was added in the middle and legs added. So in using it as a "forge base" I think table not pot. But it all really depends. 

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Yes when they said "base" I first thought they meant the part on the ground. Further writing cleared it up as to what was intended.  Used disks are often made into "discos" out here with the center welded up and 3 legs tacked on and often handles added. They are used to cook over an open fire as sort of a "Mexican Wok".

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Just to say, as a fire pot a rear  brake "rotor" has served me well as a fire pot.dimensions between 2-3"deep and 8-9" in diameter of the inner section. In my forge tables I cut a hole as big as the pot part and the flange or outer brake part holds it in the hole. The T is attached underneith. I prefer to make it out of screw together pipe fittings to make it removable or adjustable. 

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I've used a rotor for a while now too. It works best if you line the hat with a sand/clay mix to make it into more of a bowl shape. The 90 degree shoulder in the bottom of the rotor isn't a great shape to get a nice size fireball. Plus it gives you a bit of a barrier from the heat and oxidizing fire inside the lower part of the firepot.

I agree with Das about screwing things together where possible, it's nice to be able to take things apart if needed.

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I recently finished a new brake rotor fire pot, and have another waiting to get finished up. I didn't need a new one yet but in whatever little free time I have to play around I figured I'd make a few spares and be able to sell them cheaply if anyone needed help starting out. The rotors came off the back of my 08 jeep wrangler and had the right dimensions to work well. The new one is being tested in my shop forge table and has worked fine. 

Frazer, filling in the 90° is a good idea but I've never bothered. The space gets filled either way. It just uses the coal, fines and ash to do it. Filling the space would make clean out a little easier but I haven't had any issue with it not filled in. 

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