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I Forge Iron

bluerooster

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Everything posted by bluerooster

  1. It's a Ford 2N. Very similar to (but newer than) the 9N but with a Hi/Lo gear option. Yet still older than the 8N. It has served me well for the past many years, but of late it's been a real PITA to start, and today just wasn't going to start at all. I guess I'll have to get it sussed. Problem is that I suspect it to be ignition related, but the only ignition parts available here are cheep made stuff from TS. NAPA has a few items, but not all.
  2. Must haves: Forge, Anvil, Hammer, Brush (butchers block). All else can be made with that. Nice to have to start: tongs mabe 2 different jaw, Vise, (can be made but takes time, and various tools must be made as well). And an old farriers rasp. As to what all for a complete smithy, I'll let others chime in here, as I'm a noobie myself. But I didn't have the benefit of an SO who wanted to buy me all that needed to start. I had to learn by making what I needed to do the job I wanted to do. I built my forge, My anvil is 109# chunk of scrap steel, My hammer is a 2# ballpeen, but I later got a 3# cross peen, and a couple sledges ranging from 4# to 10#. But my go to hammer is the 2# ball peen. I also have a 16oz ball peen, and a 12oz cross peen body hammer. I have various hardies, punches, slitters, and drifts, that I made as I needed them. I do believe that others here will agree with me on this; No matter how well your shop is equipped, there will be a tool that you don't have, and must make for the task at hand. I've spent the majority of my (short) forging career making tools, to use to make the tool that I need to do the job that I want to do. But so far, I've had a most relaxing blast of a time, and turned out some nice things, and some pure disapointing junk.
  3. ID sux. I hope you end up in a better situation. Didn't do much in the shop today. But tried to start my tractor to move the water heater. It turns over fine, has spark, has gas, has compression, is in time, but won't fire up and run. Ended up having to heave the heater into the pickup, and get it kinda close, and then walk it from there. Anyway, got it set up, and did a trial run. From lighting the match, to 180 degree water was less than 10 minutes. If I'd stoked it up big, it would have warmed the swimmin' pond from 70 degrees to about 80 degrees in mabe 10 hours. So, now I need to get out there and start cutting firewood. (dangit)
  4. I may be doing it wrong, but even with a coal forge, I look for it to become the same color as the hot spot. When I pull it out, it's steaming (even with no flux), and a spark or two is being emitted. I usually heat it slow, and allow it to soak real good. I want everything to be the same temp. through and through. Even then, it may not work on the first go. I remember one time, everything looked good, and I smacked it too hard. All my work vanished in a shower of sparks.
  5. Ya'll are doing some nice work out there. Beeswax is unobtanium around these parts. Even though bee hives are about 50 feet apart. I'd thought about robbing a super, but then thought better of it. I'll just get some from my sister in TX when she harvests some honey in a few weeks. I use beeswax for ball lube. I mix it with peanut oil, and soak patches in it to lube my black powder, muzzleloader balls. As promised earlier, pics of the latest blade, et,al. Cold shut. Not good. And another cold shut. Hall of shame. Various items that didn't make the cut. And another thing; forge welding cable is not for the feint of heart. I tried again today. And just couldn't get it to work out. No worries though, I have 4 more pieces of cable to ruin. I really liked the looks of the cable blade, except for all the cold shuts. I may go ahead and finish it out and test it to destruction. But I'd hate to waste the time fitting out a blade that is sub par.
  6. Got the Tanto clayed last week, and had to go to work. So I decided to harden it this evening. On smaller blades, I usually heat them with the torch, and quench. But this blade is a bit longer than I've made before, and clayed as well. So I dug a quicky trench forge beside the shop, and used charcoal to heat the blade. Got it up to temp, and quenched it. that part went ok, but after the quench, and clay removal, I found a cold shut on the cutting edge at the end of the blade. Also one about halfway down on one side of the cutting edge. Other than that it looks ok. The hamon is a bit faint, more so than I thought it would be. But then again, it's a piece of cable, and probably won't get very hard anyway. I didn't get a picture of my failure, but I'll have one tomorrow. So, back to the drawing board. I have some more cable. I wish I knew what cable chokers are made of. It sparks like low carbon, and probably is.
  7. Current flows from negative to positive. So the cathode needs to be copper, and the anode needs to be whatever is to be plated. Then the electrolyte solution can be as simple as water, or as complex as you want to make it. but I would think a salt solution of some sort would work just fine. I went out and started to weld up another piece of cable. It was comming along nicely, until I cranked the blower a few too many times. When I pulled it out half of it was gone. I'd allowed myself to burn it completely in two. I guess that's what happens when you get distracted as it's getting close.
  8. I fired the forge today and learned some things. I had a cable choker follow me home the other day, and today I decided to see about forge welding it into a solid chunk to be used for something. I learned that welding old cable is not the easiest task in the world, but can be done. This cable is 7 strands, each strand is 9 individual wires. (actually that's the center strand, the outer 6 strands are 18 wires, with the outer being about 14 gauge, and the inner being about 18 gauge) Best I could do was to open it up some, and soak it in laquer thinner for a while. That got the worst of the grease and oil, but the blue whatever it is between the wires didn't budge. I left it open, and tossed it into the forge to burn off whatever is left. Got it hot, and twisted it back together, added some borax, and back for a welding heat. Found that It worked best by welding a few inches at a time, using a swage block, and turning it in the direction of the twist. Anyway, got it welded up, and looked ok. but a couple cold shuts on the outer strands near one end. (They were taken care of when I started forging it to shape) Now, what to make of it? well, I hadn't made a blade in a while, so mabe I'll make a blade of some sort. So, I set about doing just that. I usually let the steel tell me what kind of blade it wants to become. I just bang on it as it forms it's self to the shape it wants to be. Well, after a few heats, I could tell that it wanted to be a short blade of some sort. A few more heats and I could see the shape of a Tanto comming forth. So, that's what it wanted to be, a Tanto, of sorts.
  9. Yes it does. I made a mistake on the wire count on the cable. It is accurate on the center strand, the six outer strands are 18 wires, with 7 outer being about 14 gauge, and inner being about 18 gauge. The center strand is 9, 14 gauge wires.
  10. Or mabe brass rivets. I don't know what size material the frame is, but it looks like some 3/32" rivets would work just fine. I fired the forge today and learned some things. I had a cable choker follow me home the other day, and today I decided to see about forge welding it into a solid chunk to be used for something. I learned that welding old cable is not the easiest task in the world, but can be done. This cable is 7 strands, each strand is 9 individual wires. Best I could do was to open it up some, and soak it in laquer thinner for a while. That got the worst of the grease and oil, but the blue whatever it is between the wires didn't budge. I left it open, and tossed it into the forge to burn off whatever is left. Got it hot, and twisted it back together, added some borax, and back for a welding heat. Found that It worked best by welding a few inches at a time, using a swage block, and turning it in the direction of the twist. Anyway, got it welded up, and looked ok. but a couple cold shuts on the outer strands near one end. (They were taken care of when I started forging it to shape) Now, what to make of it? well, I hadn't made a blade in a while, so mabe I'll make a blade of some sort. So, I set about doing just that. I usually let the steel tell me what kind of blade it wants to become. I just bang on it as it forms it's self to the shape it wants to be. Well, after a few heats, I could tell that it wanted to be a short blade of some sort. A few more heats and I could see the shape of a Tanto comming forth. So, that's what it wanted to be, a Tanto, of sorts.
  11. Anything I haven't done before. Especially projects that require a tool that I don't have. That way I get to make a new tool or 3 so I can get started on the project.
  12. When not forging, I have myriad things to do around the house, Flying, doing maintenance on the airplane so it's in top shape and I can go flying, ham radio, making antennae for ham radio, yard maintenance, bushhoging the pasture, mending fences, milling lumber from trees cut on the property, using said lumber for various projects, and I also have a full time job which almost pays enough to buy some coal from time to time.
  13. Ya'll are doing some excellent work. I've not been at the forge for a while now, and am having withdrawal symptoms. Went to TX last Saturday to work on Dads house. (getting it ready to sell) Just got back yesterday, (Ida got in the way of my return trip) But I did manage to come home with a few items not blacksmith related. Now I have to catch up on work around the house before I can get back to the forge. Oh, the guy liked the gas keys, and may order more.
  14. I'm a very new smith. Well, a total noob anyway, the "smith" part is still up for debate. I joined this forum a couple of years ago after I'd built my first forge. I started in this mess with the grandiose Idea of making the perfect blades. And ended up making all kinds of things other than blades. I dunno, but I think I have about $100 total tied up in my smithy. No, I take that back, I bought a Champion blower for about $125, so $225 tied up. hammers were dirt cheap to free, tongs I made, Forge, I made. (3 of them) Anvil, I made from scrap steel, Post vise, made from scrap steel, and lead screw from McMaster Carr for about $10. It would seem that every time I get ready to make something that I haven't made before, I need to start by making the tools to get it done. I have a holdfast consisting of a bicycle chain, and 15 pound window weight. My punches, and drifts are made from salvaged springs, and jack hammer bits. I have made various tools for the hardy hole, in order to allow me to do certian tasks. I've learned a lot in the past couple of years, and burned a lot of coal. I still have a lot to learn. Welding seems to work sometimes, but most time not, (I say phase of moon). I've managed to forge many useful items, which have been installed around the house, and are used regularly. Thumb latches, hinges, and hooks, are most used. Bottle openers run a close second. (Not counting the tools for forging) Recently, I've been on a gas key kick. I made a bottle opener from a chunk of scrap found in a barn I was renovating. I gave it to the owner, it was his steel anyway. Well, the GC came up later, and asked me if I could make gas keys for fireplaces. I told him that I probably could. So, I've been hammering out unique gas keys, sort of a "sample batch" to see #1-If I can do it, and #2- what may, or may not sell. I learned even more in the process. Like for a nice dragon scale, the cuts need to be exactly the same. And dragon heads are difficult to forge, the dragon whiskers being a real PITA. (they are thin, and cool quickly) Basket twist is not as easy as it looks on you toob. But, the basics are there, and stock must be wasted to learn. And the square hole needs to be dead center, which is hard to do without proper equipment. (so far every hole has been a tad off center) I joined this forum on or about day one, and have enjoyed the wealth of information, one liners, and general camaraderie. I guess the main point of this is the fact that there is more to blacksmithing than just buying the tools of the trade, and banging hot steel. One must learn how to bang hot steel. That is done by making the tools used to bang hot steel. Once you get the tools made, you have a pretty good handle on how to make.....
  15. Just keep your fingers out of the way. I prefer to grind my own tool bits. I can get what I need that way. I also don't much care for quick change tool post. While four sided, the set up takes the same amount of time when changing tools. (but then I learned on machines built at the turn of the century late 1800s-early 1900s)
  16. I mix peppermint/spearmint with witch hazel, and put it in a spray bottle. Works wonders for repelling sweat bees. And smell minty fresh all day. Tried to forge a dragon head gas key today while it was raining. I learned quite a bit during that process, and mabe the next one will turn out better but this one is kinda wonky.
  17. Two more gas keys. One my first attempt at a scale twist, and the other pretty simple. I'll see if I can get a better pic.
  18. I like those tap handles. The wakizashi pair look pretty nice as well. I spent the day doing all kinds of stuff. Started with moving the GFCI for the goldfish pond to a more accessable location. Then overhauled the walkway from the gate to the swimmin' pond. Then got a good start on fabricating a tool that I have no clue what it's called. Other than spring loaded top/bottom die set for the hardy hole. I'm afraid the spring may be a bit stiff, but I'll know more inna day or two.
  19. It's a spring loaded die set for 3/8" round stock. Not certian what it's called. Top, and bottom tools in one, fits the hardy hole, and sits on the anvil. I figure when I get close, I can use it to get dimension exact. Still needs some work, (I didn't drill the hole deep enough, so I need to use my die grinder to finish) And I'm afraid the spring is a bit stiff, but time will tell. Please overlook my welding. I was going for penetration, and holding, not purdy. :)
  20. That was purely by accident, not by design. But, even a blind dog will find a bone once in a while.
  21. A while before quitting time, I'll add some more green coal around the sides. Then, when I'm done for the day. I rake the coal to the back of the forge, then the coking coal, to the back and sides, then I rake out the fire pot to the front. (leaving ash in the corners of the firepot) That way I have coke, coking coal, and green coal, in that order, ready to be fired up again. I usually get very little smoke, using a small wad of newspaper, and some sticks and twigs. But the first time I burned coal, WOW what a smoke screen, blowing directly toward my neighbor. I've since learned to allways leave the forge with plenty of coke to start with next time.
  22. WOW! I'm getting hosed at $30/ 50 pound bag of coal. Where in AL? I'm in north GA, and been paying over a buck and half per pound.
  23. If you have 220 single phase, running 3 phase equipment is no problem. All you need is another 3 phase motor of same or greater HP, as the one you want to run. EZ PZ. (3 phase motors are way less expensive than single phase motors)
  24. All I can say is give it a go, and see what happens. That's what I did.
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