ConstructionK88

Is it me or the tools?

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OK my friends, I already know how yall feel about that place but Ig purchased a belt grinder from HF and a few minutes ago decided to try it out on a small OA 7" "around the house blade" I forged recently from 1/4"x1 1/2" flat xxxxxxxxxxxxxx stock. The grit is 80 with 1185fpm. It does bog down if I press hard on it but I don't think that's a fair assessment as the blade gets to hot to hold fairly quick. I feel like it's not moving metal as quickly as I feel it should but I'm honestly not sure how much is considered normal. What is considered a common fpm, grit, and HP for moving metal? This is for shaping prior to any heat treating. PS: the file kinda skated though and took 20 minutes to get to that. 

20190927_162618.jpg

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It's listed as  3.5amps 3/4hp but I'm not sure that matters. In construction most everyone so just neeeeds a 15 amp circular saw but my personal one comes in at just 10amps and will rip 2x4,6,8,10 ect like hot butter. As in its the blade not the motor that makes the cut to me. So I'm confused if maybe the fpm is low compared to what others go for or perhaps maybe my metal air hardened somehow? 

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3.5 amps at 120 volts is less than 1/6 Hp.

A 3/4 Hp motor will be about 8 inches around and draw 13.8 amps which will just about max out a 15 amp circuit

HF lists a 1/3 Hp motor for their 1x30 at 7.8 amps

so which is it ?

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These are the stated specifications. I'm looking at it as a dremal can etch glass with a puny 12vdc 1/1000 hp motor but you can't with a boss 302. Also comparable mikita and Dewalt impact's have same specs but personal experience Dewalt easily out performs on drive power. Specifically I ask if it's the fpm, grit, or metal itself that could be an issue. I suspect the metal but I assume it's somewhere between mild and hardenable pottedmeat junk. The picture is of the metal the blade is made from. It's mainly used as store front security bar.

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First of all I don't know what xxxxxxxxxxxx stock is. The second thought is it's both you and the tool. Sounds like you bought a tool designed to do one thing and expect it to do another. Kinda like buying a 1/2 ton pick up and expecting it to carry a ton of gravel.

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no matter what your posting from,  the math is as I stated. it seems the Chinese didn't translate too well

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For roughing out I would be using a lot coarser grit belt of good quality. I would find a 24-36 grit belt and try that. And do your math to see what the FPM are for your setup, you want at least 5,000 FPM. 

If a file is skating it is hard, did you not anneal it?

 

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The 4X36 belt sander he listed from HF is designed for wood work. They come with a belt for sanding wood not grinding metal. the machine is listed as 1150 fpm really too slow for metal and a alumina zirconia belt would work better.

From HF

Quote

These high quality sanding belts are coated with hard-cutting aluminum oxide abrasives for excellent results on wood.

 

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That info helps quite a bit guys. Kinda felt the belt grit was somewhat high for stock removal. I suspect I was lost in translation lol. Though I won't say it didn't work. Just not as I felt it should. I think OK for small things like that knife but nothing large. Irondragon:  the xxxxxxxxxxxxx steel is the kind that almost gets you banned for mentioning. I'm not sure of its makeup, but from experience forging both, not much different than rebar. Softer to hammer out but definitely hardens to a usable degree. I'm not out of IQ so much I can't modify the sander. I figured I'd have to anyways. I mean 60$ kinda implies "hey, yeah, no, gotta work for it dude". Also the only thing I did was hammer it out. No quench. I laid it on top of my hot bricks to slow cool after hammering. Does that count as annealing? 

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I would wager that 1150 fpm rating is the machine running under no load. Probably no belt even.

Pnut

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The 1150 fpm is when your driving back to the store to return it.

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