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MaxThroughput

15kw Melting Capacity

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Hey All,

I am looking to buy a 15kw induction forge to help me make blades. It would be my only forge and I like that it can also melt steel down. I can't find a lot of examples, so i'm wondering if anyone knows how much steel I can melt at one time in a 15kw forge? I assume it wouldn't be enough to make a sword with 1 ingot, so I would probably need to forge weld a few of them together.

Thanks,

Max

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You do realize that steel swords were not cast to shape as melting tends to cause large crystals forming during it's cooling down that need to be forged extensively to refine the grain. (Large grain is weaker than fine grain steel.)  The famous wootz swords and even just crucible steel ones of Central Asia start out looking more like a hockey puck.

I'm sure you were just using the terminology broadly; could you restate what you want to do in a bit more detail?

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I'm not looking to cast, but I would like to melt down old scrap metal bits and mix in other stuff to form my own pucks. I guess i'm trying to find someone that has melted crucible steel in one of these 15kw induction forges and how much can be done in a given cycle, and also how long it takes. I can't find much about these.

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OK; unfortunately all the folks I know making that sort of thing use propane furnaces...I'd direct you to the Metallurgy lab at my local university, (north habitation) but I don't know if you are even in the same country as I am.

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51 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

OK; unfortunately all the folks I know making that sort of thing use propane furnaces...I'd direct you to the Metallurgy lab at my local university, (north habitation) but I don't know if you are even in the same country as I am.

I'm in Ohio. Yeah I did see a lot of propane furnaces set up for this. Propane where I live is pretty expensive though and since i'll be working in the garage over winter, I was hoping to find something a little less unhealthy to inhale. I saw a few videos of people melting steel in crucibles placed within the copper coil of an induction setup, but with people making their own custom coils, i'm not sure the maximum size, therefore the biggest crucible I can use effectively. 

I am just getting started in the hobby and hoping to eventually make knives and swords for fun.

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What's the duty cycle of the forge you are looking at?

Also didn't take long to find this: farnam-custom.com

To calculate the wattage requirement to heat steel, use the following equation:

Watts = 0.05 x Lbs of Steel x ΔT (in °F) / Heat-Up Time (in hrs)

Example: To heat 50 lbs of steel by 250°F in 1 hour; .05 x 50 x 250 / 1 = 625 Watts. Using the same example, reaching temperature in 15 minutes (0.25 hrs); .05 x 50 x 250 / .25 = 2,500 Watts. This equation is suitable for mild and stainless steels. 

Now I didn't dig to see how they were heating and there will be a factor involved in the distance and coupling and heat loss; but here's a start!

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Good Morning,

I have one and I use it quite a bit, for forging. Yes I can do a forge-weld, but there is no puddle.

I think the you-tube cowboys have pulled something over your eyes, if you want to cast.  Forget the thought of casting material for making a sword. Learn how to 'Forge, First' then you can create whatever you wish. Your creations will start with making garbage, but this is just part of the learning curve. Soon you will learn how to manipulate hot steel.

I would look for someone or an Association in your area. Learn from someone who knows what they are doing. Take little steps, bee safe!!!!

Neil

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On 10/23/2018 at 9:24 PM, swedefiddle said:

 

Hey Neil, thanks for the advice. Will your induction forge reach a temp hot enough to melt steel? Are you using this 15kw model that I keep seeing everywhere?

 

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a crucible rated for melting steel will cost quite a bit and does not last long also make sure you are prepared for a failure to happen at any moment or it can really spoil your day

suitable PPE will probably cost as much as your induction heater and it is not a good idea for the inexperienced to do this

do not rely on youtube vids as many on there are dumb and deadly

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Now you got me wondering if you could figure a way to using an induction system to mimic the osmond process...  I didn't win last night so I will probably not be finding this out...

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Good Morning TP

the osmond process...........The Osmond Family?????

It looks like the 'Max' didn't read my previous comment regarding "NO PUDDLES". You are way out beyond the left field wall. Maybe playing Soccer with a Fastball?

Neil

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I was thinking that the Osmond process needed heat and air flow and using the induction heater could make it easier.  No puddles involved---just some drippy cast iron...

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I can melt down 2 cups of steel to liquid in about 60 seconds on my induction forge. Costs about 0.9 cents.  It won't be desirable for what you're wanting it for though.

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