Cannon Cocker

Chunk of Steel? I say anvil!

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I cut this chunk of steel (16"L X 3"W X 6"H) off of a larger plate at work for the purpose of using is as an anvil.  I then clamped it down in the mill and trued up the edges.  I thought about turning a cone on the lathe and making a horn that would weld on higher than flush and then machining it down to level so that I would have a tapered transition.  However I have not done that yet.  My plan now is to make a horn that goes in the 1" square hardy hole that I welded on the end.  Do any of you have any thoughts on that?  Or other suggestions for additions/tools for the anvil?

forging1.thumb.jpg.53fb3efb0bbd4a41b352dad30c953bf1.jpg 

The Hardy tool that is installed in this picture is a splitting axe head that I cut in half.  I originally wanted the blade off of it for a hot cutter, then I looked at the back half and thought it would be good for drawing out steel if it were rounded a bit and the handle hole could be dished out to use as a makeshift swage for leaves and the like.  So I made it a two sided hardy tool.  I'm just kind of playing around trying to figure out how to make the tools out of what I have available.   Again any suggestions would be welcomed! 

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alternative horn: RR spike driving sledge hammer riveted onto shaft.  You could turn them conical if you want: anneal, turn, harden/temper, mount.

RRHammerstakeanvil.jpg.be9c9b878c6a10191ec846d97c67d122.jpg

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Thomas, I saw that in the book "Fifty dollar knife shop" and thought about it. I'm not sure where one finds those hammers these days though. All the rail around me is laid by machine.  

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For easier searching for the hammer that T. P.  mentions, is called a "Gandy Dancer".

SLAG.

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7 minutes ago, SLAG said:

For easier searching  the hammer that T. P.  mentions is called a "Gandy Dancer".

SLAG.

Thank you for that but of knowledge Slag

12 minutes ago, SLAG said:

For easier searching  the hammer that T. P.  mentions is called a "Gandy Dancer".

SLAG.

Thank you for that but of knowledge Slag

Slag, I just searched that and it appears that the "Gandy dancer" is not actually the hammer, but the slang term for the men who laid track by hand. 

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3 minutes ago, Cannon Cocker said:

Thank you for that but of knowledge Slag

Oooh! Slag has a new title, "The But of Knowledge!"

I do soooo love a good straight line and typos are an always generous font. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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As they are not being used it means they show up at flea markets cheaper.  I have several besides the one I converted.

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"But of knowledge".

OUCH!

And I cannot blame it on the keyboard.  No one would believe me.  Sigh!

Frosty,  thank you very much for pointing out that typo.

C. C.  I am wrong. 

Incidentally Mr. Gandy was a major investor in nineteenth century railroads in the western U.S.A.

SLAG.

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In particular, Gandy Dancers would “line” the track by methodically jerking it back into alignment with crowbar-like tools, with rhythmic chants and songs to synchronize their efforts. 

https://youtu.be/lu7hBuhr-Ls

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The railroad hammer is called a "spike maul".

SLAG.

 

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7 hours ago, SLAG said:

The railroad hammer is called a "spike maul".

SLAG.

Yep. And how good were those fettlers of old. To swing one of those hammers with a face no larger than the spike you're hitting is something of an art. Although, I have made a lot of bottle openers from spikes that look as though not all hits were 100% accurate.

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