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I'm working out a plant to make a war hammer, but I want it to be triangular (including the back spike). I have everything figured out except how to draw the taper out. Closest I can figure is drawing it square and then trying to angle it with diagonal blows. Is this how to do it or is there a better way?

 

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You need to make a swage. I've never had any luck forging triangle "bar" unless it was very flattened. The swage block I have has an equilateral triangle V swage. It's that or a right triangle by forging into the step on my anvil. 

If I needed one I'd either weld one up or forge and grind an equilateral top chisel and drive it into a piece of REALLY HOT stock. The dress it with sander and files. 

Now I'm hoping someone who actually knows how to forge a triangle taper speaks up, I'll be watching. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Greetings Randell,

            Your kinda all over on your projects .. Hand forging a tapered triangle I'm sure is possible but it would take forever... i have done it before but I cheated... It's simple .. Just forge a tapered square then cut in half on the diagonal With a band saw.. Post some pictures or drawings of your completed projects or drawings it would help with suggestions.. 

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

Hows dat Frosty

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Yup, triangle swage is the best way.  You can also forge a round taper, set it into the step of the anvil horn, and forge the taper with a cross pien and drive the round stock into the V of the step.  

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I'm kinda all over in my projects because I have years of backlogged ideas eating at my brain and I love learning new techniques. Couple that with how much fun i have forging just about anything and I bounce from project to project like a pinball. I have 2 knives in various stages of finishing, my first "forge to finish" knife to heat treat, and 3 other projects on Deck: the hammer, an axe, and a tanto style blade for a friend. I have an aggressive take on the learning curve, a pile of supplies, and no shame in failing.

Speaking of failing, every forge session I attempt to make tongs. Something about them hates me and I have yet to forge a good solid functional set from scratch.

Looks like a brief break until I figure out how to make a swage block.

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MAN you old farts are tricky Jim! It's a good one. I've had better luck deliberately forging a rombused square taper for an awl so cutting it corner to corner is . . . Good Dat.

Another thought for a swage. A while ago I wanted to forge hollow faces on a square taper and came up with a semi successful proof of concept spring swage. I put a hair pin bend in 1/2" rd stock and welded them to my old stand by spring swage spring and shank thingy. 

Doing similar for a triangular taper would be easy, the bottom die would be the hair pin and the top die would be a single.

Ah your message just loaded Randell. You and I could be dangerous if we lived close enough to interact, I like to say my interests are eclectic to the point of schizophrenia. 

AND there's Thomas with my next suggestion, make swages forget the block!

Frosty The Lucky.

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When I'm making a gunner's stiletto I generally find a 3 sided file and go from there.  My warhammer is 4 sided...like the ones I based it off of.

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Why did't I think of a 3 sided file? There you go Randell, buy a 3 sided file and you can file a swage! :)

Frosty The Lucky.

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Why not just weld a piece of angle iron to a hardie plate, V up. May want to support the sides if it is to get a lot of use.

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Another great idea! As to swages and swage blocks, any reason it cant be a plate like they use to hold railroad ties down with a bunch of interchangeable hardies? I would assume the mass might be a concern, but maybe just for short term until i can get my paws on a real block to shape.

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A lot of guys try rail plates for various things including a stake plate. I've never tried it, even in the field but I have doubts. The spike holes are only 5/8" sq. but that's not so bad, easier to forge bottom tools with a 5/8" shank. Heck use RR spikes. Mass would be an issue. Personally I'd go with a portable hole easy to build even if all you have is a hack saw and hand drill. Nuts and bolt are good joinery.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Ok, thanks. I welded my guillotine to one and im working on a suitable stump to attach it to, since i have a small xxxx (can i say that?) ASO. Working on turning a piece of rail into a better surface, hopefully get that done tomorrow before the weekend's forge-time.

No you can not say that here

I appreciate you taking the time to line me out.

 

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11 hours ago, Glenn said:

May want to support the sides if it is to get a lot of use.

The first idea that came to mind concerning this would be to take a piece of slightly larger angle iron and fitting your actual swage piece inside of it, then arc weld the two together, thereby doubling the thickness and rigidity. 

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If you're going to weld then laying two pieces of angle iron in contact side to side makes a much more solid swage. You can also prop the outside edge up to achieve a more acute swage. It all welds solid if you put it on a plate.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Two pieces of round stock tacked to a plate will suport the 2nd and 3rd side wile you hit the 1sr. Keep rotating. Round your square taper first. You will get a hexagon first, then as you now have appropriate flats you can work back and forth on the anvil and the round stock. A pair of bolt heads or nuts may also be helpful. 

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