confederatemule

Anvil and Vise Combined

8 posts in this topic

I have had this fer many many years. I think my stepmother gave it to me as a Christmas gift. She was an Antique Dealer and fer years my standard Christmas gift was an Antique hand tool. It has "Pat. Jan.5, 1897  No.1" in raised letters on it. No other information. It weighs 19 lbs. It appears to have been designed to clamp round objects as well as flat. I'm trying to figger out who made it and maybe find an image of a complete Anvil/Vise. Maybe I should of did some measuring before I posted this. I'll do that later today. Oh, the hole in the top is square, although it has been treated rough around the top of the hole. Also, there are no holes in the base for mounting to a flat surface.

 

 

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What did you find when you searched the US patents for that date?   Always step 1 when given a patent date!

Step two would probably be looking at the Sears and Roebuck catalogs from around then.

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https://patents.google.com/patent/US574764A/en is what I believe to be the patent

Doesn't list an assignee so can't say if the patent holder sold it to someone else or if they branded it themselves.  Since the drawing is darned close to the example you have, I'd guess they kept the patent and produced it themselves--sending it off to another maker tends to introduce some modifications.

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2 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

What did you find when you searched the US patents for that date?   Always step 1 when given a patent date!

Step two would probably be looking at the Sears and Roebuck catalogs from around then.

 

I've never dreamed of searching in U.S. Patents. Never thought of Sears and Roebuck either. 

I thought of "I Forge Iron". 

I received my copy of "Anvils in America" yesterdy so I did look in it.        

1 hour ago, Kozzy said:

https://patents.google.com/patent/US574764A/en is what I believe to be the patent

Doesn't list an assignee so can't say if the patent holder sold it to someone else or if they branded it themselves.  Since the drawing is darned close to the example you have, I'd guess they kept the patent and produced it themselves--sending it off to another maker tends to introduce some modifications.

 

It sure looks like mine.

 

Thanks, Y'all.

Mule

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I have a reprint of the 1897? Sears & Roebuck catalog  just for such "research" as they were a common source of tools for many places back then.  Funny to see someone claiming their items are rare and costly and then to see that S&R considered them their cheapest version and sold them everywhere...

The combination tools usually are more curiosity than working tools---much like today in fact...

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Mr. Confed...,

The Patent Office has a list of patent assignments. (that is patent outright sales). Such assignments are kept in an office compilation and that can be searched. The Patent Office does not record patent licenses. You will have to search elsewhere if you require that information. Often licenses are engraved on the patented tool in question.

Combination inventions are frequently denied patents  on the basis of obviousness.

That is that there is not sufficient invention to merit a patent. A famous example of that was, if my memory serves me, (Eberhart Faber's development of placing an eraser on the end of a pencil). The Patent Office refused to allow a patent for the concept, & Mr. Faber sued and lost.

Obviousness is one of the hairiest concepts in patent law.

Regards to you and "tout la gang",

SLAG.

 

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3 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

The combination tools usually are more curiosity than working tools---much like today in fact...

My old woodworking teacher used to say that  if you design a machine to do two different things, it won't do either one very well. 

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On 2017-02-15 at 1:45 AM, JHCC said:

My old woodworking teacher used to say that  if you design a machine to do two different things, it won't do either one very well. 

Yes that is usually the case. If you need to carry items on hikes avoid combination stuff get good working light weight stuff.

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