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I just bought this Trenton anvil for $475.00 and I am wondering what year it might of been made? It has an hourglass bottom and the Trenton stamp and USA on the side.The front or horn side foot on the left has W158 and I know that is the weight wich is close to the actual weight of 156 pounds. And I know that the left is the serial number and it is A23281 but the one at the end almost looks like a Z and I don't know if that was a thing they did or not. Thanks if you can help tell me what year it might of been made.

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Congratulations! I have a Trenton, and love it, yours looks nice!

Unfortunately, I cant tell you the year it was made, but I'm sure black frog, or somebody else will be along, that can.

One thing that I found interesting on yours, was that the stamp was stamped twice, I've never seen one like that, but not sure how uncommon that is. I know at least with my work, after stamping it once with my touch mark, if I have to go back to deepen it, it is sometimes hard to get it perfect in line, or it may slip, and look like the logo on your Trenton, which is what I would imagine happened with your anvil, I'm almost a %100 sure that it wasn't on purpose, not sure anyone would want to do that on purpose.

Anyways, oh yeah, Welcome!

                                                                                                                             Littleblacksmith

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Beautiful anvil, and pretty good deal. I was supprised to se an hourglass base on a Trenton. Goes to show that you can never really make universal statements about anvils. I don't know how many times I've heard people say "If the base has ledges, then it's a Peter Wright.".

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The Trentons not made in Columbus OH tended to have the configurations of other types of anvils.

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1 hour ago, Brad Mccaffrey said:

Thanks for the information. Do you guys think I should file the edges of there more even and show less of the chipping?

Nice anvil, good score. No, don't waste time and effort trying to make the edges look better, those are fine for now. Once you have some experience you'll learn how much radius you need on edges, heck you might not even use the edges, some of us don't.

Take some hot steel and a hammer to her face, she'll shine right up, I'd just put her to work as is.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I use two trenton anvils and the feet are so buggered/mishshapen and the stamping so hit & miss that you cannot read but for a number or two. One number has the letter A stamped directly over top two numbers. I have to wonder if these were made in the era prior to mandatory drug and alcohol testing.

 

Interesting that the makers mark stamp is doubled or am I in need of glasses?

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21 hours ago, C-1ToolSteel said:

Beautiful anvil, and pretty good deal. I was supprised to se an hourglass base on a Trenton. Goes to show that you can never really make universal statements about anvils. I don't know how many times I've heard people say "If the base has ledges, then it's a Peter Wright.".

Some of the Swedish anvils have "ledges."

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