Timothy Miller

A handy tool for smoothing tapers under the power hammer

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Lots of grease in there would help to keep the scale out.


Lots of grease in there would help to keep the scale out.


If you look closely at the pic at the pic I posted of mine there is grease in the pivot. The simpler design lets the stuff fall away more easily but isn't a combo either. Course another hammer takes care of that..... :D

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Great Job Grant,
I once had Fairbanks Hammer owners manual that showed a die constructed very similar to that. At the time I didn't have the tools or the money to try and make one.

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Great Job Grant,
I once had Fairbanks Hammer owners manual that showed a die constructed very similar to that. At the time I didn't have the tools or the money to try and make one.
I don't doubt that a bit. Why I rarely claim to have invented anything. The only one I had seen prior was in "Machine Blacksmithing" but it has a corrugated mating surface so the rocker can be locked in position.6456153655_2673344171_z.jpg

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Thank you again Mr. Tim Miller for exhibiting the tool you use for smoothing tapers with a power hammer.

I constructed my tool using a 1” thick bar welded to a 1” diameter pivot. All low carbon steel no heat treatment.

It wanted to flop over rather easily with the way I made it so I screwed a small conduit clamp on it to rub against the pivot. This created enough drag so it stays in place yet rotates to accommodate the taper being smoothed out.

This simply constructed tool has greatly improved the quality of my tapering and on long tapers removes re-heating and hand labor. Works excellent !

Mr. Miller you are a strong asset to this forum and the blacksmithing community and hobbyists like myself benefit from the pictures and examples you provide regardless of who came up with it first. The substance of your post stands for itself. Spears.

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Well thank you spears. It makes me sad to look at this thread. Grant made me those custom dies in trade for the vise. He had asked me via email if I would post pictures of the die set in use I have not gotten around to it yet. In the next couple of days I will get around to it. I feel a bit guilty I have not done it yet.

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These are pictures of the die set in use as grant requested. It shows a progression of taper being forged and smoothed. You can see grants humor in action you will notice his "touch mark" outlined in yellow at the base of the die.

First photo taper drawn out octogone on the drawing side of die.

second photo taper rounded up on the drawing side of the die.

Third photo taper smoothed on the rocking flat section of die.

An amazing tool by an amazing man.

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Tim,

It tis sad, but we end up knowing the man by the work. It's and ingenious and well made die set. Thanks for posting the pics.

Peter

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Thanx for sharing Tim,

 

I do think Clifton used one in the past but it sure refreshed on old boys mind.... Guess I'll get busy building one...

 

 

slick tool  Thanx

 

Jim

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hey everyone. since you have some more experience on the power hammer i want to ask you a question, especially timothy who has started this post.  i got an order the other day to forge a lot of tapers for a fence which is 400 m long. and the welder who applied for the job want the tapers done by a blacksmith so that he doesn't need to grind a 25 mm steel rod into a short taper. but before i can accept the job i need to make sure that its doable. due to the large quantity and the size of the 25 mm square stock it will be too difficult to forge them by hand. is it possible that this taper can be forged on the power hammer? i am not familiar with the techniques of a power hammer and neither do i own one. but i will meet with a fellow blacksmith in Nicosia that owns one and probably do the job with him. see the taper below which was forged by hand. in particular my question is if it possible to forge such a steep taper on a pair of flat dies. I have seen in the past some tapers forged under the power hammer but they were too long compared to what i want to do.   

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Would be relatively easy to bolt a taper die to the bottom hammer die and get the angle.

You can also make a "pinch" die for that taper.  Top and bottom tools made to match desired angle; the heated bar is placed slightly past where the point will end then bang/turn, bang/turn. etc. until the small piece of scrap on the end breaks off.  I usually do that for short tapers because I don't have to fight the material kicking back at me.

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i thought that if you bolt a taper die it would kick back the stock towards my body and maybe cause harm, so i was trying to think of a way if one can forge it with the flat dies.. but thanks for the advice. are you sure it is not dangerous to give an angle to the bottom die? i think it is safer to do the pinch die probably, so as to eliminate the kick back which will make it easier as well on the hands as i will be making a lot of them as well. 

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That is why you never stand behind the the work when you are forging on a power hammer especially  with taper dies.  But you can draw a taper that steep on a hammer safely. To consistently draw tapers the same especially short like you show you want a fixed taper die not a variable one like the others shown in this thread.

If you don't use a pinch type die, one  thing that will help are to use a "scissor cutter"  to cut 2 bars out of 1 or just to cut a little off the end of the bar.     The cutter is in effect a pinch die to preform.   You will probably find roughing the taper out on the corners of flat dies before you use the taper dies will help as well as they will draw the bar out lengthwise unlike the Taper die  which will spread as much as they lengthen.  

A bottom die only is cheaper and easier to make but if you need lots of these for an ongoing basis matching top and bottom taper dies are easier to use especially it the bars are really long and you need a stand to support the outboard end. 

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