Timothy Miller

A handy tool for smoothing tapers under the power hammer

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I tried to make it as short as possible to retain the daylight on the hammer, as a result the axle might might not be a stout as we might like. But it works well thus far. don


If the axle is just kissing the supporting die, wouldn't it be quite durable with full length support, compensating for a smaller axle?

Phil

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Looks good. I don't understand "117º block" though.


Perhaps my 117deg block reference is a bit obtuse... ;) so see the attached picture.

post-3041-0-14991300-1319247932_thumb.jp

In the foreground the is flat tilting table removed from service, in it's position is a mock-up of the 117' table. Idea is a combination of the lore which says that to taper pipe/tubes a 117 deg V block is really-great (fast, prevents collapse) and the original intent of the tilting table (to follow the angle of the taper and make it smooth). So the thought is that it would be quicker/easier to get a smooth taper on the tube w/o collapsing it. Holes in the theory include not being sure if (a) it makes any sense or (B) it would work any better or © if we might need a hand-held V on the top to make it work; however, it is clear that someday there will be a need for a non-flat tilting table.

No doubt, and we are ready.

Any thoughts welcome,


don

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If the axle is just kissing the supporting die, wouldn't it be quite durable with full length support, compensating for a smaller axle?

Phil

The axle has flattened a bit in the middle (below the center of the plate where most of the pounding happens) and as a result bent a bit so the ends curve up slightly. It doesn't seem to impact the performance but perhaps over time maybe it will? Maybe if I used a harder steel (I think I used mild, or a cut-off bolt) and a mild base that would help, it would make its little groove in the steel and ride there.

don

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Perhaps my 117deg block reference is a bit obtuse... ;) so see the attached picture. post-3041-0-14991300-1319247932_thumb.jp In the foreground the is flat tilting table removed from service, in it's position is a mock-up of the 117' table. Idea is a combination of the lore which says that to taper pipe/tubes a 117 deg V block is really-great (fast, prevents collapse) and the original intent of the tilting table (to follow the angle of the taper and make it smooth). So the thought is that it would be quicker/easier to get a smooth taper on the tube w/o collapsing it. Holes in the theory include not being sure if (a) it makes any sense or (B) it would work any better or © if we might need a hand-held V on the top to make it work; however, it is clear that someday there will be a need for a non-flat tilting table. No doubt, and we are ready. Any thoughts welcome, don


Im glad you posted this, as Im reading through this thread all thats in my head is "ok now how do I upgrade it and add swage shapes to my yet to be built tilt-table!" I was thinking more of tapered triangles and 5+ sided shapes but this is a great start!

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I LOVE the idea....just gotta figure out how to make me one. I need something similar to "don schad's" though. I do a lot of dinner bells, hooks, and leaf stems on craft show items. Most of them I have to taper and octagon under the PH and then finish rounding on the anvil. (one heat) It would be good if I could have a half taper die and half tilting flat die so that I could do it all under the PH. However, I'd have to be able to throw the tilting die on the hammer quicly before I lost heat in the small bar I'm working with in these items.

I wouldn't have time to be fooling around with lining up axle pins and holes.

"Macbruce":
Does your's just sit in that groove?

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I LOVE the idea....just gotta figure out how to make me one. I need something similar to "don schad's" though. I do a lot of dinner bells, hooks, and leaf stems on craft show items. Most of them I have to taper and octagon under the PH and then finish rounding on the anvil. (one heat) It would be good if I could have a half taper die and half "Macbruce": Does your's just sit in that groove?


Yes, It simply drops in. The only issues are if you hold the material at too much of an angle before striking it will give you a good jolt and the table tries to to hop out. It hasn't yet....A GOOD heat and careful pre positioning of the stock before the first strike remedies that.
Bolting it in is no bother since I gots two hammers, besides I cheat when I change em cause I do that with an air wrench.Pdq....
I'm gonna try tapering some sq. tubing in mine and see what happens..........

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Yours will last longer though.


I reckon either one will last a good long time as long as you're not using them to forge, just for smoothing.....
I think I'll get around to making a ''corral'' or whatever it's called so mine can be dropped in as well,there are clear advantages........
Building one for the 250 would be cool for larger stock, only if I get off kilter with that one I'll really get rocked...ouch! There's gonna have to be a commission to go along with it before it get's built.....

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Looks very nice.

How is the flatter part retained? Is it free or are there a shoulders on the inboard side of it? I see the notch but not sure what it is. Also, what's the screw do?

Do you have a pic from the side or front?

Thanks,

don

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Top notch...must be nice to have all them toys...
Yeah well, it became apparent long ago that tool making was the key to productivity for me in the forge. So, I kinda morphed into a tool and die maker with all the required tools.

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One ity bity issue that I can see with that design is that slag could fall into the spaces and do some damage to the bearing surfaces. I'd blow it out frequently.....

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One ity bity issue that I can see with that design is that slag could fall into the spaces and do some damage to the bearing surfaces. I'd blow it out frequently.....


It doesn't look like a piece of tin shielding could be fastened...however even if the bearing surface was scored and pitted I doubt the function would be impaired.

Phil

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It doesn't look like a piece of tin shielding could be fastened...however even if the bearing surface was scored and pitted I doubt the function would be impaired.

Phil


Dies that nice should be kept that way. I've had captured slag do real damage to dies...It's no bother puffing it out every so often...

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One ity bity issue that I can see with that design is that slag could fall into the spaces and do some damage to the bearing surfaces. I'd blow it out frequently.....


Lots of grease in there would help to keep the scale out.

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Dies that nice should be kept that way. I've had captured slag do real damage to dies...It's no bother puffing it out....


I do agree, why skimp on PM because the machine "can take it"

Phil

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Here's my "no axle" design ordered by Tim (southshoresmith):


6437575961_a601fd22e2_z.jpg


6437576169_86481093ea_z.jpg
Hey don't reveal my secret identity. I am super pleased. I too have experienced the problem of captured scale. I think grease will help. I also am planing on setting up a die blower to clear the scale off. I have heard that they can significantly improve the finish of a forging.

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Yep, the first time you have a loose die of sorts fastened in like a saddle or using an outboard fixture, you discover how destructive that scale can be. First time I did it, the scale had gotten under the die and really chewed a pocket into my flat die. After that I put full skirts on them. Just amazing what scale can do to even a very hard die.

Grease is interesting, sometimes it can make things worse as it attracts scale and forms a grinding paste. The small range of motion this will have in practice will probably make grease a good answer.

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