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Back to the origional post...what is"Merovingian pattern"

is it a modern American thing? I have seen the term come up a few times but cant place it exactly it looks like a variation of stacked multybar swists  certainly not historical  or Merovingian in any way as far as I can tell.

what defines Merovingian pattern in its modern context?

 

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8 hours ago, basher said:

I wonder who came up with the name?

I wonder that often, especially street names in subdivisions. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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"The semi legendary Merovech was supposed to have founded the Merovingian dynasty, but it was his famous grandson Clovis I (ruled c. 481–511) who united all of Gaul under Merovingian rule." wiki

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On 4/9/2019 at 11:15 AM, Frosty said:

I wonder that often, especially street names in subdivisions. 

My working theory on this is as thus. There is a secret society out there who is responsible for naming streets and some towns. It doesn't matter where you go in America, every town has the same street names.

Is this a coincidence? I think not!! It is a conspiracy to confuse & mislead people!! Must be the road naming department of those eyeball triangle people, who's name I can not remember at this time.......

I have wondered how things get named and the progression of languages. I find the transformation of say middle english to modern english to be interesting. 

 

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How *illuminating* a conjecture!  OTOH  There are a lot of street names down here that we don't seem to have had back in Ohio...

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Imaginative theory there but I think it groups up. When a town is first established the committee can't agree on anything but familiar names: Main, 1st. Ave, A st., Oceanside drive, and so on. Famous locals might be cursed with a street named after them, Tommy Moe st. here in Wasilla. 

After a while the easy names are used up and a committee has to show imagination. :wacko: Then you start seeing names like, "North 49th. State Street." No fooling, one of the clunkier silly symbolic names around. A lady once actually explained significance to me. 

Then the final downward spiral; subdivisions. These streets are named by developers listening to real estate agents listening to marketing agents. ow you get entire neighborhoods with: something, "Vista" street, Ave, blvd, etc., something "View,"(often the next neighborhood:rolleyes:) something "Side",  something "Shore," something "Glade," something "Lake," Ad nauseam. When they run out of ideas it gets really creative, they mix common names: "Glade Lake Side," "Glade Lake Side View," . . . wait for it . . . Glade Lake Side Vista!" ( I live in the community? of Meadow Lakes) Of course they go through the lake names, then the glade names before they start combining them so desperately. Sometimes they just scramble ones they've already used. 

I suppose a cab driver has a better handle on the street name insanity than a road maintenance guy but it leaves you sort of punch drunk. You couldn't remember the real names let alone satirize them, though we'd come up with some good ones occasionally, One of my favorites was, "Bog Bottom Vista" though, "Mountain Pit Plaza," had a nice cadence. On slow nights we'd play a name game where you'd come up with a name and the other guys would try and figure out where you were going. Sometimes the office guys just thought a new subdivision was growing next to one of our roads. 

It's like trying to mock the tabloids at the checkout. You can NOT think of anything stupidly outrageous enough to make fun of a tabloid. 

Uh. . . Where were we?

Frosty The Lucky.

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7 hours ago, Frosty said:

Uh. . . Where were we?

Trying to answer Basher's question:

On 4/9/2019 at 2:27 AM, basher said:

I wonder who came up with the name?

I suspect that the name got applied to the twist pattern found in Merovingian (migration period) blades.

 

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Yes there always seems to be a loophole for the local.  We got off work for Benito Juarez's birthday; something that never happened when I was working in NJ!

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Many of the towns and cities which were founded or expanded in the late 19th century often have streets named after Civil War generals or other prominent politicians of the day such as Grant, Sherman, and Lincoln.  Also, Presidents who were assassinated get streets named after them, e.g. Garfield, McKinley, and Kennedy.  Sometimes local pioneers figure prominently.

Since the mid-20th century developers have named streets either to promote sales or after themselves or their family.  I think there is a list where they choose one name from each column.  It may look like something like this:

A                         B                      C

Lake                   View               Street

Mountain          Vista               Drive

Glen                   Meadow         Lane

Meadow           Shadow          Circle

Woods              Grove              Path

Dell                    Glen                Avenue

River                  Woods           Boulevard

I happen to live on Mountain Shadow Lane in a development which was established in the 60s and 70s.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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In the NYC borough of Queens, you can have many different streets bearing the same number: "Street", "Path", and "Lane" run North-South, while "Avenue", "Road", and "Drive" run East-West. There are also numbered "Terraces", "Courts", and "Crescents", but those don't necessarily have a specific cardinal orientation.

https://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/15/nyregion/meet-me-at-60th-and-60th-many-drivers-find-streets-of-queens-a-confusing-maze.html

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This is the one I like. Was done by Manuel Quiroga. I've found several other  variations with a slower & a faster twist which all looks really good. 

The second photo (I forget the smiths name, Salem S something) is closer to what this was originally about. 

merovingian_opt_zpsumgnzoy4.jpg

DSC03087.thumb.JPG.ae8764a47adb984eda6436c0828f7e9c.JPG

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And I've lived in cities that had a circular road in them so the same street could be found in N,E,S,W parts of the city.

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On 4/5/2019 at 4:52 PM, Frosty said:

I want to talk Deb into visiting Meteor Crater one of these snowbird seasons.

Perhaps on your way to Quad-State?

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3 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

And I've lived in cities that had a circular road in them so the same street could be found in N,E,S,W parts of the city.

Those are called round abouts AROUND here....

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2 hours ago, fleur de lis said:

The second photo (I forget the smiths name, Salem S something) is closer to what this was originally about. 

That would be Salem Straub, who is a member here on IFI.

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1 hour ago, JHCC said:

That would be Salem Straub, who is a member here on IFI.

Thank you. My brain was saying Staub. Which I knew was wrong, but are amazing enameled cast iron cookware. Loves them I say. 

40 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Round abouts with a 10-20 MILE diameter?

Of sorts. I think that the folks who planned the roads here, did so in an opium den. 

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6 minutes ago, fleur de lis said:

amazing enameled cast iron cookware

I've got a lot of LeCreuset, but I find myself leaning more and more to the plain cast iron.

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I asked Salem Straub...Who does some amazing patternwelding.

In modern terms, it was coined by Rodrigo Sfreddo, who has used it extensively in his work.  It’s basically a stack of fine layers/thick layers/fine layers, then twisted... as seen in some migration era pattern welding (and perhaps a specific Merovingian sword that Rodrigo saw?)

it’s quite striking.

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I seem to prefer the 100+ year old cast iron; just picked up an ERIE skillet, #9, mint condition and so very light compared to the modern "lodge stuff".  Cheaper too at US$8 for it at the fleamarket.

The interrupted twist sword blades of the Migration Era generally used fewer layers but more billets than modern people generally think.

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I'm partial to my old Wagoner & Griswold for plain cast iron. I like the weight & smooth surface. I don't own a "modern" pan for cooking anymore. 

 

I'd noticed the number of billets used in the sutton hoo article you posted. Its interesting comparing the differences between the ancient smiths and modern. Technique wise. 

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