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Timber Ridge Forge

Two suits of Armour

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I figured you guys might appreciate these. I inherited them from my father who got them from our family restaurant when it closed. I have no plans on doing any work to them other then preservation. I know they are missing some finger joints  These guys are one of the reasons I got into blacksmithing years ago. 

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Greetings Timber,

         Beautiful.  Do you have any information on who made them and the time period?  Indeed a treasure.

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

 

 

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Unfortunately, I have very limited information. I have been able through limited research been able to figure one maybe from the 16-17th century based on what I believe to be a musket ball test. I can't confirm it but the dent coincides with similar damage done on those tests. The other one has Nicolo Da Ponte on it who was a Doge of Venice. I don't believe it to be authentic to his time period but maybe a piece made to commemorate him at a later date.

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Post them over at armourarchive.org, I'd suggest the historic research forum. There are some experts hanging out there. (and yes the english armour not the american armor)

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They have a look of 19th century copy to me.

The Victorians put a lot of time and effort into making copies and fakes to adorn stately homes and i believe it was done in america also.

They are not in any way original pieces, im sorry to say. They are nicely made but not functional nor are the proportions right at all.

 

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6 hours ago, iron woodrow said:

They are not in any way original pieces, im sorry to say. They are nicely made but not functional nor are the proportions right at all.

How exactly do you know theyre not original? Im no expert and this is a genuine question. 

Looks pretty practical to me. Pretty sure if i put one of those cuisses on and had you whack my leg with a sword, i would walk away just fine. 

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i went to a museum (one of many so sadly i can't give more specific info) in Chicago that had a very impressive collection of European Armour much of it Italian and i'm sure they would have a knowledgeable curator. it should be worth a bit of local research to see if they can help?

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Will, the proportions and lines for one. The makers and designers of armour were skilled artists combining form and function. The shapes of certain parts, and the lack of proportion in vital areas shows that the makers of these (and i do not believe they are from the same maker) were not masters of armour smithing, but reproducers, skilled in their own right, just not at renaissance armour.

Those close helmets and gorgets are neither practical nor historically accurate in their shape. Highly decorated amour of this period was tailored to fit the wearer, and was made to incorporate as much movement as physically possible, not merely "get whacked on the thigh and be able to clunk away"

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I believe Iron Woodrow is correct.  All of the pieces appear to be modern; possibly 19th century.  They are fun decorations but not museum pieces.  If you are inspired to make some armor, I recommend to study the museum pieces rather than these.

These would probably not work well if worn, but obviously they were an inspiring display to enourage you to do metalwork!

Best regards,

Jacob

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One of the ways to tell if a piece of armor is authentic or a reproduction decorator piece is how functional it is.  For example, are the elbow pieces made of multiple pieces which allow for the maximum range of motion or do the just sort of look right but don't move well.  Or, on the shoulder pieces (called "pauldrons") are the little domed things rivet heads which once held a leather or fabric lining or are they just dimples.  If the latter, it is probably just for decor.

Also, how thick the metal is is a clue.  If it seems tinny or kind of thick it is probably not old.

I agree that the pics posted do not depict authentic medieval or renaissance armor.  The helm, in particular, does not have "the look."  The vertical vision slits would not be very functional.

Also, is there any sign of where straps or other means of attaching the armor to a person?  If not, it is  decorator.

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