Donniev

Anyone else used tip tig?

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I hadn't even heard of it 2 weeks ago, and my boss ordered it after looking at it in action. We do process piping for hydronics, we'll have 1500 welds to make for the new power plant going up in town and this is supposed to speed us up. Just gonna take longer than usual since every weld has to pass x-ray (despite it being a 28 pound system) I like it, but the death grip is definitely back- this thing feels huge in my hand compared to my 150 amp rig rig. 

Anyone else used this? 

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What's the advantage? You still have to make the puddle before you can fill it, making an automatic wire feed makes me think you should just use a mig.

That said it's been so long since I ran Tig I'm a couple decades out of the loop.

Frosty The Lucky.

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More than just a wire feeder, there is an agitator in-line in the wire feed. The wire is pulsing in and out like a tattoo gun needle, which helps to flatten out the puddle.

Expensive, yes, but you get TIG quality with MIG speed. About a 500% speed increase on average, YMMV.

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Interesting tool mig - tig Hum I have done a Ton of tig work in my life ! would like to run one & see ?

if they have to x ray a 28 pound set up they need better Tig welders lol  

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I was wandering if it auto fed like a mig or had a secondary trigger to advance the wire, John. 

Grew up learning gas welding first (exaust pipe for cars and bikes) so the few times I have used tig I haven't embarks than myself. Stick came second then mig. Now I have to use magnifiers, dark lenses and work lights or I can't see the work and the puddle. 

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Wolf they're requiring x-ray because the previous contracted welders migged everything and I guess basically every other weld leaked. So leaks coupled with the fact that it was buried downtown with new concrete poured before they found out it leaked lead to their engineers getting pretty XXXXXX off, hence the x-ray requirement now.

It pulses in and out of the puddle like John said around 30 times a second, and the wire is preheated right before it comes out over the cup (that's what that blue ground wire is for). It's a pretty impressive set up honestly, once we both get accustomed to the weight of it we'll be able to fly on these welds

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Were not going to attempt to put the root in right away with tip tig until we've got a few weeks on it and used to it. My first root with it is almost perfect, key word almost doesn't mean much for an x-ray job though. The plan is for me to root everything by hand and other guy will hot pass/ cap with tip tig.

 

If I remember I'll get a picture of my tip tig root tomorrow

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Right on id like to see it cause i got a feeling that set up might not be user friendly in the root without practice. I  rather freehand the tig root cause ya got more options try as they might it will be along time before they replace the guy in position with the torch the rod and the eye.When they bring in this new stuff its always built to weld the perfect fit and conditions lol in over 20 yrs of positional pipe welding and xray work,i'm still waiting for the perfect fit.

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As you can see with the cold wire in the back, that weld was used to fine tune and adjust the welder, 2nd one is good 

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Is the qc checking the roots before there shot cause i see a possible repair at 5.30 off the bottom it looks like the root is closen up on the side shot at about 3 oclock these must be practice coupons are they.I think i'd wanna practice with that tip a l;ittle longer to get a bit more comfortable. Like anything else the more ya do it the better it gets its comin along. I wanna get one now to try, what schedule of pipe ya welding .

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Schd 40 this was just a practice one. Were not going to put the root in with it, I'll root everything by hand other guy will hot pass and cap it all with tip tig

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Interesting and sorry I missed the post when it originally came around.  I am looking into exactly the same thing for a semi-robotic TIG application I need to do.  Unfortunately, I have to do it on the cheap so will end up using the crappy Chinese versions of the wire feeder.  Hoping that it works out---will be using a brand new miller welder for the power supply (can't go cheap there)

Instead of a running bead, I need to make a series of tiny spot fillet welds along a 3/16" dia T304 SS rod.  The guy doing the welding by hand now is actually getting carpal tunnel problems from the repetitiveness of the job--5 or 6 thousand little spots a day.  Although I'd rather pay a guy than pay for a robot (work is about people, not just profits), it just has to happen for health reasons.

Anything I should know about those TIG cold wire feeders which isn't obvious until you start gaining experience with one?

 

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Nothing comes to mind immediately...most of it is getting used to the weight of it, the other battle is fighting the tungsten/ wire distance, it has to be a perfect 1/8". Also we change tungsten frequently...since carbon is so dirty if any impurity gets pushed out near the tungsten it grabs on, and this isn't like doing it by hand, can't continue even with a slightly dirty tungsten. Has to be perfect...not sure if that'll help you too much or not, but that's all I can say on this so far

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Thanks.  Anything helps.  We're going to use a pencil torch with a gas lens and it won't be handheld.  I had already considered the issue of keeping the tungsten clean and consistently sharpening  for repeatable results---something I have to get the crew to keep up on if this is going to work.  The welds are so small that slight inconsistencies in process will bite me.

Biggest shop problem I tend to have is inertia:  People resist changes quite strongly..and when finally onboard, complain "why did you force me to do it the old way for so long?" :) 

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7 hours ago, bugg said:

does anyone out there using the tip tig use the flex heads that they offer

 

I don't understand what you're asking. A TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) tip is a tungsten needle electrode used to make an arc to the grounded stock being welded. They are NOT used with flux, the shielding gas serves the same purpose flux does in electric welding. 

I believe you're thinking of something else.

Welcome aboard Bugg, glad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might be surprised how many members live within visiting distance.

Frosty The Lucky.

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