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Hi, my son and I are new to blacksmithing and knife making, and its absolutely grabbed us. We're lucky to be able to use a 200 year old original double bellow pig skin forge made of convict blocks on Norfolk Island, we make our own charcoal in drum and everything - very cool. Like others we've tinkered with knives, pokers, bottle openers but would like to make a replica whaling temple iron and even though we don't agree with whaling, whaling is a major part of Norfolk Island history from the 1950s, but even after lots of attempts and frustration (we don't have a teacher) can't make the cone which connects the iron lance to the wooden handle. Can anybody give us some guidance? It would be very much appreciated.... thanks in advance.

 

 

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Glenn   

For cones in general, measure the circumference of the smaller end of the cone, the circumference of the larger end of the cone, and the length of the cone. Transfer these measurements to paper using an imaginary center line at the midpoints of the circumference. Circumference lines should be perpendicular to the center line. This will give you a visual on paper of what material is needed to make the cone.

Decide now smooth you want the cone. More is smother, less is not as smooth. To pick a random number (say 10) divide the smaller circumference line into 10 equal segments. Do the same for the larger circumference. Now draw a line from the small number 1 mark, to the large number 1 mark, and repeat for the remaining 9 points. Bend on the lines to make the cone.

This will butt the two edges together when finished. You may want to leave additional material for overlapping if that is needed.

 

 

 

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I assume the cone you are asking about is the one at the end of the iron shaft, the cone accepts the wooden harpoon handle?  If so this is the same as making a socket chisel the socket being the cone you require.  The two sides of the socket are forge welded once hammered to the correct shape.  Glen and other here on the forum can do a much better job of explaining what to do or where to reference information, I know I once saw a video on You Tube on this.  Good luck.

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Hidiy -

Cool projects;  you can forge the lance as if it was a candle holder, or something with a leaf on the end, et cetera ,  drawing out the "cone" material on the end of your material opposite the finial/poker end. If it is to be one piece. 

You'll need the bossman's geometry above in any case , but if the cone is independent of the staff and the spear  (3 pcs total) there are multiple options. Paper/flexible templates are a huge help. If the spear pictured is available,  you can make a pattern from its cone: wrap it with saran wrap/cling wrap,  tape over the cling wrap with fiber backed shipping tape  (all the way around, criss-crossing the tape), then carefully cut the pattern off exactly the size of the cone.

Something called a flexible shape pattern I believe.

Brad 

 

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HI all, thank you so much for the prompt replies, very much appreciated. We're fly to Melbourne today to the Australian Open Tennis, back in a week, so we will give it a crack. Bringing back another bag of tools too.... Thanks again.

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Frosty   

Welcome aboard Jonathan, glad to have you. Forging a socket to receive a wooden handle or shaft is more basic than it seems and there are a lot of Youtube videos showing how that guy does it. Just don't take anything you see on Youtube as THE way to do a thing.

As an example of different methods, sockets, even ones requiring high strength don't need to be welded, they can be punched and riveted or pinned to the shaft. Welded sockets were made of course just not always.

Frosty The Lucky.

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May be a bit harder for you using mild steel than wrought iron like I believe the originals were made from.  As mentioned make some paper templates to get the sizes down and make a conical hardy tool to true it up on and weld it on when you get one you like in iron or steel.

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HI everyone, thanks for the guidance. We're on our way home to Norfolk Island from Melbourne... with many new blacksmithing tools. Can't wait to give it a go. Thanks again.

Jonno and Croyden

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I'll add this, I personally believe it would be easier to forge weld the material for the cone to the spear point than forging the cone out of a single piece. trying to forge a cone out of 1" material is not fun.

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Marc1   

I would make the spear and the cone separate, and the cone I would forge out of a pipe and then forge weld it onto the spear 

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Hi Wayne, thanks for that. We're new to this so say no more, but we tried a dummy run a few days ago and while didn't struggle to forma shape to cone, had issues getting enough 'cone' out of the steel shaft we were using. From a traditional harp we got our measurements from, the wooden harpoon handle is 30mm wide and the harpoon shaft is 10mm steel. Works well as both are size of steel and broom handle we were able to get our hands on.

Jonno.

 

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one trick for cones is to upset the starting stock a bit by heating the end and pounding it vertically on the anvil face giving a sort of anti taper and so putting the most metal where you need to draw it out sideways the most.

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