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I Forge Iron

What paint to use on a forge?


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Just finished building my forge. It’s a mix of refractory bricks and cement incased in 14 metal with angle iron. 
what type of paint should I use and should I used a primer as well?

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High temp paint for the ends above the ports and the top were the burner goes. Engine paint would work for the rest. But as a can will do it, I would say just use that. It is sold as BQ paint as well as automotive exhaust paint you can find it at either Wally World or an automotive parts store.

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The outside shouldn't get crazy hot. 

From use with other things I use them on, I prefer Duplicolor engine paint or VHT Flame proof exhaust paint. Any engine, grill paint or exhaust spray paint should work fine, I only recommend the brands mentioned because of good application and longevity I have had with them.  

Even the clear works on bare metal, no primer needed. Follow instructions as best is reasonable (since it is on something it is not quite instructed for) and use a degreaser on the metal before application. 

They do dry hard without heating them up, just to say. Proper temperature of the metal when spraying does help with application.

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Thank guys. 
I wanted to make sure there wasn’t something specific that was for forges. 
Being that I just started welding about 3-4 months ago and this is my first ribbon burner and forge build, I’d like it to last as long as possible. 

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How hot your forge skin will get will be determined by the insulation value of your inner layer (type and thickness of the "refractory bricks"), the way the combustion exhaust exits from your door openings, and how hot you run the interior of your forge.  This is very difficult to predict (and can vary quite a bit depending on the insulating value of the bricks used).  I would use it, as is, for initial firings and measure the peak surface temperature.  Then select a coating to suit that temperature.

Are those "hard" kiln bricks, or "soft"?  If the former, they will have substantial thermal mass to heat up and potentially more thermal transfer losses.  If the latter, please keep us posted on how long the forge "roof" holds up.  Soft bricks are very prone to thermal shock and/or brittle failure.  Hopefully your design includes provisions for relining your forge.  Even under the best of circumstances you may have to replace it periodically.  On my first brick forge, I used some leftover 2300 deg. F rated bricks that I had from another project and the bricks opposite the burner melted away...

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