Bean07

First solid fuel forge fab.

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Ok. In my "built my first Jabod" post, you can see I had it down at a steep angle. As the day went on, I was working it closer and flatter to the top in an effort to not burn the steel.

 

Bean07 looks like a nice forge. 

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Fuel does not make a fire hotter, air makes a fire hotter.

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36 minutes ago, Glenn said:

Fuel does not make a fire hotter, air makes a fire hotter.

After posting that, I read another of your posts explaining it in great detail.

I think the problem I had was a combo of placing my work at a steep angle, and having to much air flow since I was using an air mattress inflator.

Btw, thanks for hosting this site where we newbies can come to learn from ALLOT of very educated/experienced people.

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Had to replace the 3 year old underbench oven all day yesterday, anyhow got a few things done also going to do the front door similar to the rear two, I reduced the amout of slots as you can see my  height base plate is next then ill do the underside after.

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Why thank you very much VainEnd84, it is a learning work project i've always wanted to get into, funny really when its been said by many of my friends over the years that what we do for a living we are not supposed to like doing at home. OFF Topic LOL a few things at home and at work, this is who I am, i'm just gunna put another pic up, the last one please lets not go on about it, it just shows how much steel is part of me haha

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Modify your fire shape and size to fit the project at hand. Try putting a piece of pipe, say 4 inch diameter, into the fire pot and just below level with the bed of the forge. Fill the area between the pipe and original fire pot with ash or non-combustible material. This will reduce the fire size and create a small hot fire for use on ends, twists, etc when a larger heat zone is not heeded.

For a long fire, use or make a piece of rectangular tubing to fit inside the fire pot.

 It will also save fuel.

If you find a shape fire you like, weld up a base plate (that fits the bottom of the grate) to the extension you like and keep it on hand for when it is needed. Makes it easy to clean out the fire pot, insert the modifier, fill the remainder with ash etc, and light a fire. When finished just remove the modifier. Think of it as your new rose bud. (grin)

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Im hearing you mate, luv your knowledge on Forging, im like an old sponge I know what is great! being here cheers all.

 

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Getting set up in a lean too off the rear. after its made though.

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Cheers yet again Glenn ! ok a lower front wall to suck the exhaust better it sounds more logical looking at this first photo, I did want to know how high to lift it but that is also said! Im curious as xxxx second photo how hot did it get roughly, I worked five years in BHP and watched the big digital Dial say when the steel was formed  ! and from memory it is 1430 C, 2606 F, so what do these get too? Also ive completed my version of your fuel saver idea cheers for that too. second to last pic she cleans up so easy thanks again for what im learning.

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May I suggest you stand at the front of the forge and lower the front of the hood to where you can still see the pass through door. If your concerned then the top half this distance can be solid and bottom half can be hinged to swing up and out of the way. A catch would be advised to hold it in place when in the up position. See red lines in the photo below.

Suggest you hinge (or allow for removal) the side panels from the top of the forge walls to the bottom of the front hood cover. This should substantially reduce the open area of the hood and allow the chimney to suck the smoke from the forge up and out the chimney. Practice with some thin sheet metal until you get what you want. Plate steel is not needed for this, just thin tin. After all your only blocking the air.

What size is your chimney diameter?

If there is a lack of draft, then close or block either side from the top of the forge wall to the floor of the forge. Sample pieces of thin tin will work to practice with until you get what you want. See green lines in the photo below. Lines are approximate. When the mobile panels top and sides are swung open, the open area should provide full access to any project you you want to have in the fire. 

It is all about playing with the system, and making modifications, until you get what pleases you. Please let us know how it turns out. 

Forge hood 01.jpg

 

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What size is your chimney diameter?;; the chimney is 11"

Please let us know how it turns out. :: No worries ,im back at work from Monday so I wont be doing as much as ive been doing,so it will be steady as she goes from now on.Thanks again for your wisdom Glenn.

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On 1/9/2019 at 1:39 AM, Glenn said:

Modify your fire shape and size to fit the project at hand.  It will also save fuel.

If you find a shape fire you like, weld up a base plate (that fits the bottom of the grate) to the extension you like and keep it on hand for when it is needed. Makes it easy to clean out the fire pot, insert the modifier, fill the remainder with ash etc, and light a fire. When finished just remove the modifier. Think of it as your new rose bud. (grin)

Took good advice all was fantastic today MKIII Test im happy as !

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Does the hood remove the smoke from the work area to your satisfaction?

Is the size and shape of the fire good for getting your project metal hot?

Do things get hot quickly enough for you?

Did you try to cut back on the air flow and use just the amount of air required to get the heat you needed from the fire? 

 

Nice job on the forge build. Be sure and post photos of your forged projects.

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1: yes very good!

2:Outstanding!

3: scarily in a way!

4: yes have a great adjustment with the air feed!

Finished with that final touch on the front. Glenn ive been a boiley over forty years! Doing Pressure Vessel making, building mobile cranes designing quite a few jobs, worked with 8 massive propane heaters to straighten the rear of massive dump trucks,waste ind etc. but ive got to say so far in this new journey for me this Coal forge ! I am really impressed with how well it performs.

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The forge is just another tool in your toolbox LOL  In time you will learn to use less coal to produce more heat by controlling the air flow. As you get comfortable with the forge, put one piece of metal into the sweet spot of the fire and heat as needed to get ready to forge. Place a second piece of metal at the EDGE of the fire so it can preheat, but not get it hot. Then place a third piece of metal on TOP of the fire just to get it warm. Rotate the pieces of metal as needed to always have metal ready to forge. Warning: You CAN NOT keep up with the fire. The fire enjoys watching you break a sweat, will trick you into trying to keep up, and then laughs when you loose track of how fast you are working.  

Once you find your grove (pun intended) put on some tunes in the background. May I suggest the following:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQywghOO1mc

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EJrSIJi-E0

 

As you forge, if you miss the metal and hit the anvil, it is ok, it happens. If you miss a second time, turn the forge to idle, sit down and rest for 20 minutes. Your getting tired. If you miss a third time, shut the forge down as you ARE tired to the point you are a danger to yourself. Do not say you can work to the end of the project, or just one more piece. Shut the forge down and walk away. You can always come back, build a new fire, and finish later.

Remember to stay hydrated and fed. Make your time at the forge fun, and enjoy the ride.

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As Glenn said, Stay fed when using a charcoal forge.

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10 hours ago, Sly said:

As Glenn said, Stay fed when using a charcoal forge.

Oh yes that is true! cant beat a great steak ! and water with a nice cold beer to wash it down .

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11 hours ago, Glenn said:

put on some tunes in the background. May I suggest the following:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQywghOO1mc and  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EJrSIJi-E0

Make your time at the forge fun, and enjoy the ride.

Yes Glenn I like to have music playing every time im in my shed, (Make your time at the forge fun, and enjoy the ride.) pardon the pun ,heres one for that haha

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My approach to the getting tired when forge welding is to do a high heat, flux scrub the flux and scale off and then snowball it, put my part in, build a big stack with a a little oil, get it to a reducing flame tape my air off a little to reduce the ogygen and let it soak for a half hour to an hour or more and then hydrate/ cook while applying the austenization treatment. I get to rest other then occasionally checking on the steel, if something goes wrong like clanker ect i just take the steel out and let expanded grains cool down.

It helps quite a bit for forge welded stacks especially when dealing with non similar metals in a blade steel billet. 15n20/10xx doesnt have this issue so much but if you have a semi random mix of alloy steels with bloom steels for a katana or a serpentine pattern with twists its a good practice.

I try to forge all day so i work maybe 1-2 breaks in to treat my welds this way and drink about a gallon at least of gatorade or tea, something with sugar in it.

Dont forget to stretch on your breaks too to avoid strain. Its another big deal when being in close proximity to high heat and working.

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G,day sly it,s like most things in life like Glenn said with more experiance you get more akin to doing things in a better productive safe order as explained by yourself too, I did a few months working between the two blast furnaces at BHP Whyalla Over 1460C and saw a few guys pass out,we was also working under the top roof bent over ( 5' roof height ) 6 stories up inbetween the two furnaces, we were aloud to walk down every 15 minutes a long gantry/walkway a small platform near the peak with a great view across the gulf. 4 decades as a boilermaker ive work on some very hot jobs too,got to say aswell I dont mind working my guts out too, im enjoying reading up on many posts ?topics here,I love learning from this great Forum, well lets say in a few short weeks ( for me) I have made a wicked coal forge already. cheers Sly

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OK im tight when spending in many ways  lol thats whats great being a boilermaker all my time to save $$$$$$ haha well here goes ive been very coy on how and about my air supply! I left my mobile at work yesterday and was going to post this yesterday, I bought and use a blower/vac, a cheap one,, I could of gone out and bought a valve but thought it still required an air release ie when doing the kindling etc. folks here may laugh but this works sweet as and cost me just my time and using my welder etc.

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On 1/12/2019 at 6:22 PM, Sly said:

I try to forge all day so i work maybe 1-2 breaks in to treat my welds this way and drink about a gallon at least of gatorade or tea, something with sugar in it.

A gallon of Gatorade?! That may be too much of a good thing. If you pay attention to professional athletes on the side lines, they generally drink a little Gatorade from the cooler and then the rest is water in a bottle with the Gatorade logo on it. While it does have electrolytes in it, the electrolytes are mostly sodium and potassium. Sodium you can get from any food with salt in it and potassium is found in alot of fruits, veggies, beans and grains, and lean meats. That steak on the grill has all the electrolytes you would get from Gatorade without the large amount of sugar. I'm not against sugar intake in any way, but a gallon of Gatorade has over 100 grams of sugar, which is just to much to be healthy. Sure you get an energy boost from it, but it also contributes to a "crash" when your body burns through it, unless you supplement it with something that breaks down slower, like protein, fat or a more complex carbohydrate. For hydration, I just use water. If I'm looking for electrolytes, my go to is tomato juice. It has many more electrolytes, alot less sugar, complex carbs that break down slower so I don't crash, and I can say I'm getting my veggies. Heck it even has some fibre in it. This way I'm able to work longer due to a gradual energy reduction instead of being fine one minute and done the next.

BTW, that is a great looking forge Bean. Way better than my first forge

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