MotoMike

finished my quench tank

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It is a retired oxy tank.  29 inches tall.  I needed a base for it to make it stable.  Job done.  Also decided to make it somewhat mobile.  the flame lid is easily flipped closed with tongs.  with 3 gallons of oil in it.   I hope there is enough room to contain any splashage that might occur.  All scrap or items in my collection waiting for a use.  

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2 hours ago, MotoMike said:

It is a retired oxy tank.  29 inches tall.  I needed a base for it to make it stable.  Job done.  Also decided to make it somewhat mobile. 

Looks good, Mike. It should be a versatile size for most work, and it's nice that it's portable. If it's an aluminum tank, I think that a strong neodymium magnet on a rod might work well for retrieving any accidentally-dropped magnetically-attracted ferrous objects, since the magnet would not want to stick to the tank.

Al (Steamboat)

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Thanks Al.  good point , I have a pretty strong magnet on a telescopic handle that hangs off the forge to check for non mag heat.  I had thought of making a screen foot with a handle on it for retrieval but now you got me thinking. 

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That container could weigh as much as 40 pounds full, with the center of gravity 15 inches or more from the floor. To keep it from tipping over, or being bumped over, make a wide stable base with wheels.  This will allow it to be easily moved out of the way when not in use. Chain it to a wall like you would a oxygen tank for added protection. 3 gallons of oil can make a real mess if spilled on the shop floor. (grin).

A trivet type screen at the bottom of the tank with a handle to raise it up when needed will come in handy.

Keep the container covered when not in use to keep out things that should not be in the tank, think critters. You may want to clean and flush the container on an annual basis, just to keep things tidy.

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How are you preheating the oil?  I have a Steel block attached to 3/16 steel wire with a hook on the end to suspend it just over the bottom of my pressurized gas tank quench tank. Heat the block in the forge and then drop it in the tank and hand the hook on the rim.  It's really amazing how much the oil expands when heated---good idea to leave room for it.  I used a smaller tank to suit my general use case for it and built a holder for it to prevent knock overs.

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Glenn.  Appreciate the advice.  I've just come in from the shop.  I tilted the tank over until I could feel it was about to go on it's own.  It took abut 35 degrees to get it to start to go.  It seems pretty stable to me.  believe me, I don't want 3 gallons of oil on the floor.  I've had half a quart and that looked like a gallon while cleaning it up.   I like the idea of a foot strainer or basket  in the bottom of the tank with a handle.   I have decided to put another strap on it and some two stops on the base up tight against the tank to lock it into one spot.  

 

Thomas.  I hadn't worked out the details for heating the oil,  but something along those lines was what I was thinking.    For my tank,  I had initially planned on using a 3 inch pipe with a rail plate for a foot.  but when I did the math and the urging of a few smiths, I realized It really was only going to hold a little over a half gallon and I knew that would not be enough. 

I realize that by keeping the level 7 inches below the top, I will have to be close to directly above the flame area if not right above it, so a big glove will be critical for the quench.  

Thanks gents for your input.  It is much appreciated. 

Mike

 

 

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10 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Heat the block in the forge and then drop it in the tank and hand the hook on the rim.

Thomas, what are your thoughts about using something like a silicone-pad-type pre-heater wrapped around the outside of the tank and used in conjunction with a thermostat? An aluminum tank like Mike's should transfer/distribute the heat more evenly than a steel tank. Have you ever looked into using one of those heaters? I've used them on a couple of automotive oil pans for fairly low-temperature cutoff, like around 80F, but I think that they are capable of higher temperatures when sized accordingly. However, I have not yet investigated this kind of heater for use on a quench tank, and I'm not sure if it's a good idea, but I thought it might be worth researching at some point in the future.

Al (Steamboat)

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They don't work in myshop; perhaps when I retire and can get power run out to it... I think the area of the pad vs the size and contents of the tank might cause issues; especially if the tank is radiating.  I'm also leary of splash issues with standard insulation.

Rductio ad absurdum: one could use an apartment electric hot water heater with your oil tank mounted in it and get the thermostat built in.

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thought I was finished but I guess I'm not.  Glenn,  took your advice on the foot strainer.  

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