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Story board for the Tomahawk workshops at the ABANA Teaching Tent. As always, my target student is someone that has limited tooling, therefor, all steps can be done at the anvil and vice. The three semi-finished Tomahawks are to help give folks ideas on what they might do. I left them mostly in the raw, as that's about what folks will have the time to do in a four hour workshop.

Picture 2616 Large e-mail view.jpg

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Sometimes people do not realize that represents 10 (ten) tomahawks in various stages of work. In order to get to tomahawk #10, you have to make #1 tomahawk 10 times, #2 tomahawk 9 times, etc. 

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Thanks very much for the picture. Very helpful. 

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That’s really useful; thank you!

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11 hours ago, Glenn said:

Sometimes people do not realize that represents 10 (ten) tomahawks in various stages of work. In order to get to tomahawk #10, you have to make #1 tomahawk 10 times, #2 tomahawk 9 times, etc. 

And that's not counting the ones that didn't make the grade :-)

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It is, this is a story board work in progress.  Still getting all the bits ready.

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Gerald,  as I was looking at the photo you posted it occurred to me that your storyboard communicates what needs to happen without language.  That would be a huge advantage for a foreign student, or even a student with limited vocabulary.  I've had teachers whose enthusiasm for the subject led them to talk so much that they complicated a simple lesson.

Another thing that really pops out at me is that your story board is driven by the smiths thought (and working) process rather than the presentation medium.  I've sat through a whole lot of power point presentations that adapted a lesson into "bullet point lists" simply because that's what powerpoint does best.

Ten "slides" with bullet point lists of instructions would be less coherent than the single photo you've presented.

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Having a bit of trouble (no pun intended) determining the difference, or even the purpose, between steps 2, 3 and 4 (if taken from the top as #1).  I've only made a handful of hawks, but some I have thinned down the cheeks (as is sometimes done for a folded axe), but I don't see any evidence of that here.  Is the difference between the three just that step 4 has well planished surfaces?  If so you might consider leaving step 2 a bit rougher to more clearly show the crosspeen marks in drawing the head wider.

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I see the difference between 2 and 3 as giving a degree of curvature to the blank (the "hard way", in the long direction), but I could be wrong.

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John,

I agree that there is a curvature difference between 2 and 3, but since it goes back to a flat top on 4 I don't necessarily see the logical progression.  Of course storyboards must leave out some steps, or they would be huge, but I'm suggesting that currently the sequence between 2, 3 and 4 is not completely clear.

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