cedarghost

Problems with super glue finish

16 posts in this topic

I have finished a few knives using SuperGlue after reading many posts about it and I like the way it finishes up.  It seems to be really durable as well. I tend to have some difficulty cleaning and polished where the super glue covers the metal of the blade, for example, on the spine. 

it is quite possible that some of my difficulty stems from lack of cleanup before applying the glue. That has certainly been the case at least once. 

If anyone has any tips for finishing the SuperGlue over metal, I would appreciate it. 

My typical process is to clean the handles, apply a couple of coats of SuperGlue, let it dry then wet sand with about 400 grit. Apply another coat. Wet sand with 600 then 800. Apply another coat then wet sand starting with 800 out to 2500. Polish with red, white, then green clay.

I have used it over wood , resin cast handles and ram's horn. 

 

Thanks, 

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Your problem is with the steel or wood? If it's where it's slopped onto the steel just remove it with acetone, I believe the directions are on super glue packages under in case of emergency.

I have no idea about getting it out of wood without long term repeated soaking in acetone.

Frosty The Lucky.

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It is with the metal Frosty. And I should probably have read the directions....;)

 

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Also, keep in mind that superglue (aka cyanoacrylate) comes in a variety of viscosities. You want the thinnest variety you can get, so that it soaks into the fibers of your handle material and bonds inside the surface, rather than sitting as a film on top.

Also, try putting a layer of tape on the steel before you put on the glue. You may get some seepage (depending on what kind of adhesive the glue has), but you won't have to worry about slop. 

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3 hours ago, JHCC said:

Also, keep in mind that superglue (aka cyanoacrylate) comes in a variety of viscosities. You want the thinnest variety you can get, so that it soaks into the fibers of your handle material and bonds inside the surface, rather than sitting as a film on top.

Also, try putting a layer of tape on the steel before you put on the glue. You may get some seepage (depending on what kind of adhesive the glue has), but you won't have to worry about slop. 

Good advice.  Thanks. I'm glad you said that about the gel. I had been thinking of trying it out. To read your explanation answers the questions I had.

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That's why it's good to have the occasional woodworker on the blacksmith's forum.

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No doubt. Much appreciated 

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Be careful with the thin viscosity superglues, they flow like water and very quickly get into places you dont want or expect them. If you have not had much experience with spreading superglue over large areas be aware of the fumes, hard on the sinuses and makes the eyes burn!

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Yes. A respiratory and ventilation is definitely in order!

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3 hours ago, cedarghost said:

Yes. A respiratory and ventilation is definitely in order!

And surgical gloves.

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I won't pretend to have any knowledge in doing any of this but on the tape idea, there is a plastic tape used for taping edges or pin striping paint work called fine line tape. Look for vinyl fine line tape. ( it's usually blue) found in auto parts body repair sections. I think it might work well for what you mentioned. 

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You're a spoil sport John. I was looking forward to an awkwardly typed post about how to get his fingers unstuck from something more interesting than the knife but that would've been okay.

Superglue is used extensively in fossil extraction and preparation you might find some useful tricks on a paeleontology site. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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On 5/16/2017 at 2:11 PM, Frosty said:

You're a spoil sport John. I was looking forward to an awkwardly typed post about how to get his fingers unstuck from something more interesting than the knife but that would've been okay.

Superglue is used extensively in fossil extraction and preparation you might find some useful tricks on a paeleontology site. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Hahaha! Thanks!

On 5/16/2017 at 2:05 PM, Daswulf said:

I won't pretend to have any knowledge in doing any of this but on the tape idea, there is a plastic tape used for taping edges or pin striping paint work called fine line tape. Look for vinyl fine line tape. ( it's usually blue) found in auto parts body repair sections. I think it might work well for what you mentioned. 

I have some. Didn't think to try it but will be worth a shot. 

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Just to report back. I used blue painters tape on the spine of the knife and it worked great. Most of the tape peeled off and the rest was easily cleaned up by hitting it with acetone and then 1500 grit.

 

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Top knife was the first, bottom was the second. Ignore the other issues like the liners. Learned a hard lesson there...haha

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