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RHolly

Bay state anvil

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Had a friend give this Bay State anvil. It may be in the 80lbs ranger . Its condition is pretty bad. I have googled info an bay state anvils but haven't found much about them. Anyone one have any info?

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Richard Postman said that he saw several advertisements but had not recorded any Bay State anvils when his book was published. According to the advertisements, they appear to be low end cast iron anvils, but they do have a thin faceplate similar to a Vulcan. Richard postman has recorded 100s if not 1,000s of anvils, so the fact that he never saw one of these is interesting. Anybody else here have one? Might be worth contacting Mr. Postman.

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Thanks for the response . It's in pretty bad shape. I was trying to figure out if it's worth trying to restore it or just clean it up and use it as a shop decoration.

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Not worth trying to restore. If I were you, I would try to sell it to an anvil collector that likes rare anvils. Then, you can use the money to buy a good one.

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Well, seeing as your friend gave it to you, I would just wire wheel the top and get using it. I know I wouldn't feel real good if I gave a friend an anvil, and he just turned around and sold it to a collector......

All you need is a good surface the size of your hammer head.

It still has a hardy hole, so you can make some tooling with a good edge to drop in it.

Give it a shot.

 

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I wonder if I try and resurface it would that ruin any potential value? Would like to use it but I do not want to make matters worse.

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Just wire wheel it and use it. there is no value but what you can use it to make. As an antique it is beat, but as a functional anvil/tool, it looks like you can use it and make money with some practice using it. Don't get hung up on looks, Get forging.

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Anvils do not have to be pristine to be usable. You don't even have to wire wheel the top, just the act of forging on it will shine it up in a hurry. All you need is a couple of square inches--the size of your hammer face to work on.

If you do knock the rust off, post up some pictures of the top surface.

Decking anything off of it will decrease the usability since they have thin top plates to begin with. NO GRINDING ON THE TOP.  Smoothing the corners is OK. 

Get it mounted up solidly, and get working. If you are just beginning, work on basic hammer skills and accuracy. Round to square, square to round. Tapering rounds and squares. That kind of stuff. Make some basic s-hooks with the previous practice pieces.  

For bottom tools to drop in the hardy hole, make one with a thicker plate welded to a shank for edge work. Make it so that the width is as wide as the anvil face. A cutoff tool is also needed, and a good practice project. No need to heat treat. 

 

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I have been going to the forge council meetings at the AG museum here in Jackson, Ms. Usually have a demonstrator and then we get in the forges. 

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I have been going to the forge council meetings at the AG museum here in Jackson, Ms. Usually have a demonstrator and then we get in the forges. 

So I have been googling trying to find contact info for Richard Postman. Anyone have his contact info?

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