Recommended Posts

Very little on any pneumatic hammer. I have a few hours on a K-40 Kuhn and a good half hour on a Nazel 3B. I recently got a 50lb. Little Giant mechanical.

What I have is experience covering my bets buying expensive equipment. A good guarantee from a company you can get to is worth a lot. I take anything a salesman says as suspect until proven otherwise and look for outside opinions.

On general principle aligning things that are attached is much easier than things that rely on gravity to be immobile. Put the pieces under impact and it becomes more problematical. A one piece hammer will remain aligned so long as it doesn't get bent and they do not have enough energy in the machinery to bend it.

Before I believed a salesman that a cast iron one piece base was secure enough to keep the sow from shifting on a 2 piece power hammer I'd have to see the plate in person and run it a while.

That's just my take and I'm a guy living in the forest in Alaska.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It cost me thousands of pounds and weeks of work to install my two piece150kg / 3cwt (336lbs) hammer. But only hundreds of pounds to mount my one piece 50kg. / 1cwt (112lbs) on a 30mm base plate and put that on rubber buffers.

Prior to the base plate and buffers for the concrete floor, the one piece was run for a couple of years on two planks levelled on sand in slots dug out from the subsoil earth floor. With just a couple of Ø24mm pins driven into the ground through the hold down bolt holes to stop it rotating.

Definitely go for a one piece with a hammer that size. 

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the explanation about the two part hammer.  The dealer says the anvil is bolted in place properly at the factory so I can treat the whole unit of hammer/anvil/base together and not have to worry about it, but that I can also re-align by adjusting the bolts if I need to.  

On the surface that sounds good, but I don't feel very good about the long term stability of bolts in that kind of use.  I'd feel a lot better about this if I could see it, or know someone who had years of experience with that design.  I'm hoping to hear back from such a person, until then I'm keeping my money on this side of the ocean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These hammers come with a base that holds the anvil. The base also forklift holes in it. Installing my C41-40kg hammer was just as easy as installing the 50 lbs little giant I had.

hammer.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.  Its great to hear from someone who's done it and has first hand knowledge.

That's a nice looking fly press there on the left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's not what I envisioned at all Sharpshooter. It sure looks secure. Is the sow sitting on the hammer base in addition to the fitted socket section?

Makes me wonder why they'd make it a two piece, perhaps makes it easier to machine to finish?

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/5/2015 at 12:52 PM, 78sharpshooter said:

These hammers come with a base that holds the anvil. The base also forklift holes in it. Installing my C41-40kg hammer was just as easy as installing the 50 lbs little giant I had.

Not what I would describe as two piece at all! No installation worries with that one.

My 50kg  Reiter has a separate anvil but it is bolted to the main frame and is also bolted to the inertia block along with the main frame. I consider that to be a one piece also. 

The two piece description is usually reserved for hammers where the anvil block is held in place by an inertia block of concrete poured on site so the installer has to set up and link the two together rather than the factory. If that one was painted all the same colour and as it comes from the factory as one unit then "one piece" would be the more conventional description I think.

Looks a tidy unit.

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its good to hear the concerns are gone.  What I liked about the 2 piece was that it weighs 90 kilos more.  As far as price, hammer is less, base is more.  Combo is close to the same, 2 piece a few bucks more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I would not really be too concerned with a hammer like that regarding alignment.  To me a 2 piece hammer has the 2 pieces aligned during installation.   Bob Bergman has done something similar with lots of 2 piece Nazels essentially turning them into a 1 piece.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello ,

 

Here you can see another photo of this two piece with base. Its correct that its same instalation as a one piece. 

 

The extra anvil weight makes a difference and that is apart from the hammerframe. The needed anvil adjustment is not any big problem.  I have side by side tried one and two piece hammers. And I prefere the two piece.  

 

25 kg hammer.jpg

Edited by Åge Hjortland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wired a 30% deposit.  If all goes well, the finished hammer should ship in about 3 weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's update #1.  I just got confirmation that the money arrived and my hammer is on the production schedule.  They said they'll send me pictures as it moves through the process.  I'll be sure to compare them to pictures another buyer got and see if they're the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I'll be sure to compare them to pictures another buyer got and see if they're the same.

Sad world that a suspicion they are trying to cheat would cross your mind…Why would they offer to send you photos of your hammer manufacture if they were just going to send images from the archive. Or are you thinking it is just a cynical superficial marketing/customer service ploy?

What will you do if you discover they are the same photos, cancel the order?

I quite often keep my customers updated with progress photos, they have a stake in the project too…maybe your hammer company feel the same way and want to share their excitement with you...

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're right Alan.  I meant that as a joke and it obviously didn't come out that way.  After writing it I was afraid that might not make it across in a message to people I've never met face to face and thought I should not post it, then I went ahead and did it anyway.  I should have gone with my first thought and not posted it.

So far, they've been responsive, friendly, and I have only positive reports from other customers and an online search for anything negative didn't turn up anything.

As for shipping, the price includes shipping by ship as part of a container and insurance against loss or damage.  I'll have to pay customs, some dock fees, handling fees, and things like that at a cost of about $300 and another $95 for a professional who'll fill out the forms for me and tell me where/when to pick it up.  I'm less than an hour from the 2nd biggest port in California so I'll go pick up with my truck.  The shipping agent could have arranged to have it delivered but I figured I'd save that money and go myself.

I'm hoping it will be ready to go around the first week of September and be here middle to end of October.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done, I am glad my response was unnecessarily parsimonious! :)

I am very impressed with idea of buying something so large and unseen from the other side of the world. Very grown up. A real adventure, financial profit or loss notwithstanding.

But I guess you have a different take on distance than I do. If I buy something from the furthest reaches of this country it will still only take a day to travel by road. There are bits of China almost closer to you in California than the further reaches of Newfoundland!

I have just heard that China has devalued its currency, you may do even better than you thought with the remaining payments! Scary if it had gone the other way…your luck is holding!

Alan

Edited by Alan Evans

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My quote is in Dollars.  Whatever happens to the Chinese currency, good or bad, is in the seller's court.

Foolish or brave, I'm always ready to dive in to things I know nothing about.  That trait is the biggest gift that my father passed on to all of his children.  Sometimes you learn a really good way to do things.  Sometimes you learn an expensive lesson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My quote is in Dollars.  Whatever happens to the Chinese currency, good or bad, is in the seller's court.

Foolish or brave, I'm always ready to dive in to things I know nothing about.  That trait is the biggest gift that my father passed on to all of his children.  Sometimes you learn a really good way to do things.  Sometimes you learn an expensive lesson.

So  the seller scored, with no extra expense to you , good for him.

Expensive lessons are deemed " school fees" usually a memorable class!, yet usually still cheaper than ivy league business schools, sadly not usually added to your resume!:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So  the seller scored, with no extra expense to you , good for him.

Expensive lessons are deemed " school fees" usually a memorable class!, yet usually still cheaper than ivy league business schools, sadly not usually added to your resume!:D

This "University of Life" I am enrolled in is extremely expensive for sure!

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have followed this thread with interest.

In 2004 I saw some information on the internet about air hammers from Anyang. Merely to amuse myself I sent an email asking for prices. Within hours I was surprised by the relative affordability of a Chinese hammer. The C41-40 (88lbs) at US$3300 was within my financial grasp at that stage and after a bit of internet haggling they agreed to $3000 FOB.

I had NO idea of how to go about buying a 1000 pound hammer over the internet from China while I sat at home in South Africa. However, I went to my bank and within a short period of time took the gamble to buy the C41-40.

Long story short, 38 days after the bill of lading and final payment had been made my hammer arrived at the front door of my workshop. The following day I received a phone call from Anyang in China to ensure that the machine was in my possession and whether I was satisfied with the service I had received. What is more, they asked if I was interested in taking on the representation of Anyang hammers for South Africa and beyond. I received my hammer sometime in November 2004 and on Christmas day of that year someone phoned from China to wish me and my family a Happy Christmas.

The whole experience was one of the most profound commercial undertakings that had ever occurred in my life and gave me reason to understand why China has become the second largest economy in the world.

It took me a good few days to move the hammer onto the mounting I had pre-prepared because I had to "borrow" lifting equipment...but to this day that hammer has not given me one moment of grief or disappointment

Phabib, I wish your experience is as sweet as mine.

Regards,

Kevan

DSC_0148.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Purchasing from China , make sure company has ISO 6000 rating or better ... Usually have better Quality control , make better goods      James

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the story and good wishes.  

The quote package they sent me included an ISO 9001 certificate.  When I've participated in certification at places I've worked I found that it was more about documenting whatever it was you did, rather than doing it well so I don't put a huge amount of faith in the certification.  You could certainly argue that looking and documenting processes at least forces you to think about them and improve things you find, but I don't think its a given if the commitment to quality isn't there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the story and good wishes.  

The quote package they sent me included an ISO 9001 certificate.  When I've participated in certification at places I've worked I found that it was more about documenting whatever it was you did, rather than doing it well so I don't put a huge amount of faith in the certification.  You could certainly argue that looking and documenting processes at least forces you to think about them and improve things you find, but I don't think its a given if the commitment to quality isn't there.

Wearing my grumpy hat I tend to agree about certification systems, it still comes down to the actual man on the machine on the day...I always think it is just for the benefit of the insurance companies rather than the customer. Should anything fail the source of the failed component is traceable through manufacturer and /or material supplier.

And there was me a few posts back taking you to task for being a cynic! :)

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The manufacturer says my hammer is about a week away from being ready to ship.  They sent 5 photos showing the hammer from various angles as well as the dies that I ordered with it.

IMG_20150912_105950_HDR.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.