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Spring Fuller

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Made this today. 1/2" x 36" round of cold rolled steel I picked up at Lowe's. This seems to be one of those things everyone makes differently. I couldn't find anything on the 'right' way of making it, but I once I figured out what it was supposed to do and what the important things on it were, I managed to figure something out that seems to work. I will probably have to work on the hardy post a bit. It sees to sit fine once I install it, but when I bang on the arms, it moves some. Either that or I'll make a wedge to drop in alongside the post. Fun project, btw. Took some thinking ahead and planning, which I haven't had to do too much of yet.

Big question I have is if I should harden the arms at all. Once I got this shaped, I put it on the ground to cool and it hasn't been quenched at all. After these pics were taken, I did figure out how to adust the top arm so it's more parallel (paralleler? ;)) to the bottom arm.

springfullerI.jpg
SpringfullerII.jpg

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one way is to make your hardie tab longer and fold it to one side so you have 4 of the round rods in the hole the you can shape it to fit. you did a good job making it I myself like a gillatine tool to do the same thing. you can make it a little stouter.

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I was thinking about doubling the tab again, but it barely sticks out of the bottom of the hole now. I like that because I can give it a tap with a hammer and it comes out pretty easily.

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Parallel arms don't matter so much, they will alter depending on the size of material you are using in them, and the depth of fullering you are producing, an angle will allow more versatility for different size bars

Hardening is a personal choice, I don't think it to be necessary, and there is a possibility of breakage, they are quite long lasting, and easy to replace,

If the location in the hardy hole is sloppy there may be a tendency for it to twist out of vertical alignment when in use unless you make sure the centreline of the top and bottom bar and the hammer head are in line

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What you get from Lowes, etc. i mild and isn't going to harden enough to matter. A fast quench from non-magnetic heat in salt saturated water at the spring might give it a little more bounce though. Wait till you have it adjusted to what you use it for most though.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks for the advice, John & Frosty. I'm still working out the n00biness of using it, and I didn't want to bugger it up unrecoverably with my fiddling around. Lots more practice with it needed before I really know what I need or don't need to do with it.

I'm going to do some digging around for more projects like this one. I really did like making this, and it was quick, too - took maybe an hour or so, which is fast for me at this stage in my 'career.' :)

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Thanks for the advice, John & Frosty. I'm still working out the n00biness of using it, and I didn't want to bugger it up unrecoverably with my fiddling around. Lots more practice with it needed before I really know what I need or don't need to do with it.

I'm going to do some digging around for more projects like this one. I really did like making this, and it was quick, too - took maybe an hour or so, which is fast for me at this stage in my 'career.' :)


Everybody's new to something and needs to work out the details or what fun would anything be? Life on the learning curve is my cup of coffee. Oh okay, tea, I like tea. . . if it's iced that is. <wink?

As to projects like this one, try forging one into a cut off, or should I say one of three basic types: a top/bottom hot cut, a top/bottom butcher and a shear cutoff. I'd open it wider too, I seem to make mine too close for hot steel to slip between without hassling and losing heat.

It's all learning curve, no mere mortal will live long enough to learn even a goodly fraction of what's to know about steel or forging it. It's like an endless smorgasbord I won't live long enough to take even a little taste of it all. It's a good thing

Frosty The Lucky.

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Everybody's new to something and needs to work out the details or what fun would anything be? Life on the learning curve is my cup of coffee. Oh okay, tea, I like tea. . . if it's iced that is. <wink?

As to projects like this one, try forging one into a cut off, or should I say one of three basic types: a top/bottom hot cut, a top/bottom butcher and a shear cutoff. I'd open it wider too, I seem to make mine too close for hot steel to slip between without hassling and losing heat.

It's all learning curve, no mere mortal will live long enough to learn even a goodly fraction of what's to know about steel or forging it. It's like an endless smorgasbord I won't live long enough to take even a little taste of it all. It's a good thing

Frosty The Lucky.

I'm with you on the working things out part - it's what kept me in the ski/snowboard business for so long. Everyday was a new problem to figure out a new solution for. :) And it looks like steel is definitely going to be the same way.

Are you saying I should make another spring tool, but instead of fuller bars turn them into a cutter/butcher/shear? That sounds like a great idea, and a heck of a lot easier than making 'regular' hardy tools with the materials I have ready access to. I'm going to have to mull that over for a few days and figure something out for the next session - hopefully this Sunday.

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Material: cold roll steel is worked cold to a lmore correct size and has a little nicer finish than hot roll. That makes it cost more. Coil springs from small cars may work better for less money. and wouild have carbon in them so after you get all right with the world yold could heat treat.

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I'm with you on the working things out part - it's what kept me in the ski/snowboard business for so long. Everyday was a new problem to figure out a new solution for. :) And it looks like steel is definitely going to be the same way.

Are you saying I should make another spring tool, but instead of fuller bars turn them into a cutter/butcher/shear? That sounds like a great idea, and a heck of a lot easier than making 'regular' hardy tools with the materials I have ready access to. I'm going to have to mull that over for a few days and figure something out for the next session - hopefully this Sunday.


Yes, the only limit to spring tools is your imagination and needs. I'm not sure how well a shear will work, it may be unstable side to side but it might not. Let me know how it works if you give it a shot please.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Does any body have any suggestions for making a spring fuller that doesnt use a hardie hole?... I have a rail road anvil and i dont have a hardie hole to use.

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Do you have a vise of some kind?

If so you could attach it to a piece of angle iron or T section and hold it in the vise's jaws, (Straight pieces tend to slip in the jaws)

If you dont have a vise, make the fuller so you can clamp it with a G clamp (or bolt to) to the web of your rail road anvil, just bend the support to fit to the web of the track, this shape will depend on whether your anvil is vertical or horizontal, and allow the base of the fuller to rest on your anvil's working face.

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Matt,if you have access to a welder you could weld a "U" shaped piece of material to the end of your anvil(the "U" shape as you look down at the face).Whatever you choose to do though you will likely have to have a hefty chunk of metal to keep it from jumping around.

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i used a tire iron, squared off the socket to fit the hardy,and bent 90 degrees to form the hardy post. flattened the middle of the iron and bent over the horn to get two "parallel" bars. light heat treat and it works wonderfully. only gets stuck in the hardy hole when you have to take it out in a hurry. 

different size irons will get you different size fullers

i think that i saw that on the internet somewhere.

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