lordcaradoc

Jesse James Blacksmith

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Cool video, thanks for posting. Too many of the really cool things in life go by in a blur. thanks for slowing things down a bit.

Mark <><

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I agree that is a cool video. Very theatrical and hollywood feeling to me though, wish he was actually making something instead of just letting excess oil drip and shoot fireballs while wailing on a stick of red metal. High speed cameras are nice.

smiths opinion

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" Would you like him better if he was a nice guy crocheting doilies? "

Rotflmao

Jesse, welcome to the black boogered society.

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Ok, it is time for references.

From Wikipedia
Jesse Gregory James (born 1969) is an Americantelevision personality and CEO of West Coast Choppers, a manufacturer of custom-made motorcycles. James was the host of thereality TV shows Jesse James is a Dead Man on Spike TV and Monster Garage, on the Discovery Channel, and the focus of the documentary Motorcycle Mania, also on Discovery. James also appeared in the Tony Hawk's Underground 2 video game.


Career
Custom motorcycles and cars

After several years working as a bodyguard for Danzig and occasionally for other bands such as Oralia Ramirez, Andrea Ramirez and Soundgarden,[2] James opened West Coast Choppers in his mother's garage in 1992. The company grew quickly and soon moved to a larger facility for select customers and companies. About 200 bikes have been built at West Coast Choppers. West Coast Choppers is also sponsoring race teams in Top Fuel Drags and Super Late Model NASCAR. James recently bought custom car business Austin Speed Shop and has expanded into the custom car business. James has also built and is racing an off-road Trophy Truck and a Figure-8 race car.

Other business ventures

He was the owner of the Cisco Burger restaurant, which opened on April 28, 2006, just down the street from West Coast Choppers. The 1950s style hamburger stand — named after his beloved pit bull who is now deceased — features Angus beef burgers, low-fat burritos, organic vegetables, and biodegradable wrappings. It has officially closed. James also has partial ownership in the South Austin Speed Shop in Austin, Texas. Other business ventures include the Chopperdogs fan club and the Jesse's Girl clothing line. Since 2006, James has nationally published Garage magazine.[3]

Television

In 2000, the Discovery Channel made the documentary Motorcycle Mania, which chronicled James' everyday life. Following the success of the documentary, the Discovery Channel approached James with an offer to host a new show called Monster Garage where James and a crew of mechanics modified vehicles under a short deadline.
James later established Payupsucker Productions, under which he produced shows like History of the Chopper, Iraq Confidential with Jesse Jamesand Green Scream, in which James plans to break the land speed record with an eco-friendly hydrogen car.
Through James' show "History Of The Chopper" there are also glimpses of his involvement with the Hells Angels and other 1% outlaw motorcycle clubs.
He appeared on the second season of Celebrity Apprentice. Each celebrity played to raise money for a favorite charity; James selected to play for the Long Beach Education Foundation.[4] Due to his poor performance in raising funds, James was eliminated by Donald Trump on the second-to-last show (ultimately placing 3rd) which aired May 3, 2009. Trump repeatedly cited James' stoic refusal to contact then-wife Bullock to raise funds for the show's challenges, though other celebrities had no problem tapping high-rolling contacts for cash.
His show Jesse James is a Dead Man premiered on Spike TV on May 31, 2009. The show features James doing death defying stunts. The first episode set a ratings record for Spike, drawing the largest audience ever for an unscripted series on the network, with 2 million viewers.[5] The show is produced by Spike TV, BASE Productions and James' company, PayupSucker Productions.[6]
In conjunction with that appearance Marvel Comics created a special one-shot comic book where he evades death once again after considering retirement, and made it available in comic book stores for free distribution.[7]
James has appeared on an episode of Street Customs where he had his pickup truck customized by West Coast Customs. He appeared in an ad for T-Mobile's Google cell phone with Whoopi Goldberg and Phil Jackson.[8]

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Give the man credit.

He has been working with metal most of his life. At 23 years old he started a business. Outside of working with metal, James other business ventures include the Cisco Burger restaurant, the Chopperdogs fan club, and the Jesse's Girl clothing line. Since 2006, James has nationally published Garage magazine. I am sure there are some I have missed. I have even seen tools with his name and brand on them.

Jesse joined IForgeIron and through this site located and purchased blacksmithing equipment and a power hammer. He contacted Uri Hofi and went to Israel to study under Hofi.

I do not see anywhere in my research where this was handed to him, no one gave him the keys to a fully furnished shop and said here ya go. I do see where it worked at what he was interested in, and turned that interest into a business that supported him and his family.

To be fair, compare Jesse's bio to your bio. You know what you have accomplished in your lifetime.

I personally would like to study under Jesse to try to gather some of the knowledge he has on design and fabrication, working with metal, whether it be welding, the English wheel, the Nazel hammer etc. I am sure it would kick my life up a notch or two.

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I think what he does, he does well. He seems to admire the craftsmen of whatever he does. I remember episodes of Monster Garage where he compliments people whe could lay down a better tig bead than him, he had nothing but respect for the old-school hot rod builders and riviters and whoever else turned out some amazing work, no matter how mindless the general population might think it is.

He has also designed some pretty cool pieces of equipment. His bikes changed the industry. His eye for design is pretty awesome. The old Villain bike he made is probably my favorite bike of all time.

You might not think that he is a 'blacksmith'. To be fair, he's only been doing it for a couple of years (part time while he has been running a large business empire) so don't expect master level products from him -yet. Give him time and I think he will be making some pretty cool stuff in his forge. He produced a pretty cool bottle opener during that news spot so you can't say he just only likes to hit things with a big hammer.

Bottom line is he is a TV personality (love him or hate him) who can actually walk the walk. There's a lot of hosts who just yap to the camera. Put a hammer or torch in their hands and they would be useless. Based on that fact alone I respect him. What he does with his personal life is none of my business.

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He is definitely skilled at working cold metal and designing the same.All the theatrics in the world won't make any one better at forging. It will just take time to understand and get good at pushing hot metal around. None of us learns this in a year or two. I started in the 70's and I'm still learning. Always will.

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I would not want anyone to see a video of my life. :huh:
It would take the joy and focus off of how my life is NOW!

It has taken everything good and bad to help me realize the good life I have now!
My choice is to focus on a man who I beleive is an acceptional Craftsman.

Welcome Back Jesse

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That video going up the hill at the festival just made my day. I used to fancy the idea until I discovered I was a better race engineer than a driver. I hope it was JJ driving.
The hammer video was very atmospheric as well, lovely.

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I have made a lot of decisions in my life that were, well, less than admirable. Not all were popular with others and many not popular with myself. Some are still not popular with people. No one that visits my forge or buys my items ever asks me about my colorful past and that is how we should treat each other. Even if certain items are aired out for all to see, it is still no ones business. We are all different and that is what makes us unique and what makes a lot of what we make unique.
Jesse is what he is. If he wasn't then we would say, "Jesse who?"

I am glad that Mr James is here because like ALL the other members of IFI, he is here to learn, teach, share and hopefully laugh with us. Not defend himself because he doesn't "measure up" to others standards.

Let he or she who has no skeletons in their closet sit back and take a lesson from the rest of us who do.

Welcome Jesse.

Mark <><

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I thought a 100 ton press was cool, that is going to be sweet. Make some videos with that thing, nothin like a little profesionaly produced machine porn to brighten my day.

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Does anyone know the brand of the shielded safety glasses that Jesse is wearing ? I have been hunting for a pair of the older "rail workshop" safeties with metal shields for ages but have come up short. There is nothing like that in Australia and Google has fallen short...

Franky - hope the press goes well, you want to be the guy working under the press not driving. If you are driving you have time to notice how much movement occurs in the frame under load, especially with asymmetric loads... I always become really aware of load bearing structures around me that I will be moving towards when it all lets go.

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We all have different personalities and behavior levels,that`s all part of what makes us unique and individuals.

While you may not agree with an artist`s ego or their projected self image, anyone who knows quality work when they see it has to respect the final results that Jesse consistently turns out. His level of craftsmanship and understanding of functional design puts him in the top of the class as far as craftsmen go, IMO.
I also have to say I have nothing but respect for a person who has a vision,sees what he needs to learn in order to personally bring that vision to life and then once he has that skill set in his hip pocket he invests his time and money in finding or making the machines and making the tooling to manifest that vision with minimal outside help.
As one who has been as just a skilled pair of hands being directed by "conceptual artists" and other paper pushers I have to say I would probably get along better with someone like Jesse James than I did with the "artists" I was contracted to work with or many of the spoiled rich kids I had to put up with while building/repairing yachts. Anybody who is willing to stand with me and get their hands dirty right along with me has a chance of earning my respect. Doesn`t mean we won`t end up shouting at each other in frustration or disagreement at some point, just means at the end of the work day we will both respect the other`s true potential and abilities.

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Not sure why people are interested in or make judgements about the personal lifes of people they dont even know.

The more interest and exposure that our craft gets the better. A rising tide lifts all boats...

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Word. Not sure why people actually believe what they read on the interweb, or the newspaper. Skepticism is mandatory or else you're part of the problem.

Suweeet press!

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This Has to be said. I am pretty overwhelmed by some of your introspect and responses. I am involved with lots of different forms of metal working and fabrication. I have to honestly say that the blacksmith community has been hands down the most soulful and welcoming. Anyone I have reached out to for help has gone above and beyond. This is something I have never experienced in 30 years of metalwork. I just wanted to take a minute to express gratitude to Uri, Larry, Grant, Brian, David, and Dillon and everyone else on here for not judging me, and treating me like and equal. I feel like I have truly found a home in this community. If I can ever offer anything back please do not hesitate. Jesse James 1244362552_uxB2a-L.jpg

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