Recommended Posts

Hi Gang,
Does anyone know of a source for post drill bits besides ebay ? I have 3 really good post drills, one dated 1807 and I don't want to put "modern" chucks in them. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are talking the drills with 1/2 inch straight shanks , correct? We have a post drill at the Boy Scout camp smithy, I made a few different size drills from 1/2 inch 0-1 drill rod. Turn down ( or grind or forge ) down to the desired drill size and make into a simple spade drill. Harden , temper and go ... these flute-less spade drills work good, chip extraction is not an issue since most holes are not deep.

Joe B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seeing how that's no longer the case, wouldn't it be worth it to have a chuck with a 1/2" shaft to use for smaller bits? Alternatively, if one truly desired, it would be easy to boare a slug of 1/2" cold finnished bar and siver solder an adapter to each bit, asuming acsess to a lathe. It would seem a waste of time to me though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found new ones (old stock) at small town hardware stores it never hurts to check them out. take one along with you to show them what you want

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They have a ½" shank with a flat on one side.  The flat lines up with the locking screw on the post drill chuck.

 

Most people machine the morse taper on a jacobs chuck etc down to a  ½" shank with a flat.  This however does reduce the max size piece that can be fitted into the drill.

 

I only have one NOS proper drill bit  and never seen another here in Australia, yet I have 7 post drills.  Would love to find some more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I added a jacobs chuck to my old Buffalo Forge #65, I pulled the shaft and chuck from a trashed breast drill, had the shaft machined down as others have suggested, and to avoid losing any travel distance by the additon of the chuck, I swapped out the bog standard 1 inch pipe that the post drill table slid on for a longer section. The new pipe was an additional 6 inches long (IIRC the chuck stole about 3 inches) and fit into the round boss at the bottom of the post drill casting and the small base casting on the other end. Had to cut a longer 2x4 that the post drill is mounted on to accomodate the new length.

 

All that said, I've never had a need for the sort of deep drilling situation the longer pipe allows for. a 1/2 inch hole in an inch thick plate is the most involved post drilling I've had to do, so far, and I could have done that with the set up as it was, even with the jacobs chuck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can we see some photos????

 

What he said, can we see some photos?

 

...I have 7 post drills.

 

And can we see some of yours?

 

Cheers,  Vann.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some pics of typical sets of post drill bits. As mentioned they have 1/2" shafts with a flat side that the set screw holds on. I have quite a few post drills from very small to very large. I have one that I use that was set up on a welding/work table. It is a champion and is powered by an electric motor also has a 3/4 Jacobs chuck. I bought it that way at a farm auction. The table is so big and heavy no one would bid, I bought it for $5.00 had to go to the next door farm and borrow a tractor to load it. I unloaded it with my tractor but had to get 4 guys to help get it in the shop. No regrets it works great the way I found it. I'll post pics in the show your post drill topic.

 

 

 

 

post-39154-0-40273200-1410713846_thumb.j

post-39154-0-68486300-1410713849_thumb.j

post-39154-0-69467300-1410713852_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A desperate source for bits is with a drill. Occasionally the seller has some "thrown in" with the post drill  

 

I bought this modified Champion Blower & Forge No.101 recently (refer 1st photo).  

 

I didn't particularly want the post drill, but it came with an unknown quantity of "Silver & Deming" bits (refer 2nd photo).  

 

Now that I've picked up the drill, I've had a chance to check out the bits. There are 24 pieces: 11 are under 1/2"; 12 bits are 1/2" or greater; and one bit (in the middle of the 3rd photo) that looks like maybe it's for countersinking a 1/2" hole.   Although some are short, or abused, or both, there are enough in good condition to put a smile on my face. I'm particularly pleased to have acquired the ones under 1/2" as these are akin to hens teeth (over 1/2" you can buy modern reduced shank bits and grind or machine a flat on the shank).  

 

Cheers,  Vann.    

post-50372-0-65097900-1412679333_thumb.j

post-50372-0-25437400-1412679361_thumb.j

post-50372-0-13159700-1412679389_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this is an old post, but I just picked up a buffalo 612. It has a Morse taper with a slot in the main shaft, with another what appears to be a smaller Morse taper stub inserted. What are my bit/ Chuck options. I'm new to post drills so go easy on me. Thanks

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have a morse taper shaft, the options are just about endless as you can use adapters. You can get all manner of bits with morse shafts, morse reducers, chucks and collets with morse mounting shafts. Depending on where you are in the world sourcing things may be simple or difficult. If you have access to a lathe you may be able to make your own attachments.

The slot, by the way, is to facilitate of removal of what ever tool is inserted, inserting a metal wedge drives it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎12‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 8:31 PM, ShaneW said:

What are my bit/ Chuck options

I have a similar Champion post drill.  What has worked for me is to just remove the smaller Morse taper adaptor and insert a standard 1/2" Jacobs chuck with a spindle taper that matches the larger Morse socket.  Then you don't have to go searching for Morse taper bits, but can use more readily available standard drill bits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now