mpc

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About mpc

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    S.Idaho

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  1. I'm making plans to pull the old lining out of my forge and re-line it. The attached diagram is the basic layout. I'll do 2" of ceramic fiber and then I figured I'd coat the inside with about 1/4" of Satanite or something similar. The big question I have is about the floor. Right now, there are a couple of fire bricks sitting in there. This works well as it brings the floor up to almost level with the openings in the front and back of the forge. But, when I do anything with flux, it runs off of or between the bricks and gets into my forge lining. So here are my ideas: 1- Make a floor out of a castable. Unfortunately, this will not be easily replaceable AND with it being about 2" thick there are issues with it sucking heat. 2- Just use bricks (like I have been doing) but use a castable/refractory that will resist flux for the 1/4" coating. 3- Use bricks and a flux-resistant coating AND put a layer of kitty litter or sand or something in the bottom to "soak up" flux and then sweep that out occasionally. I'm particularly curious about # 3. I keep hearing about people with vertical forges having "kitty litter" in the bottom. Why wouldn't this work in a horizontal forge? I would think it would also help to keep my fire bricks level and in place (not that they move much now). Please share your thoughts or advice. Thanks!
  2. You know that feeling when you realize that you’ve been walking around with your fly down since you walked out of the bathroom 15 minutes ago. I’m having that now. In my haste to see if it worked, I let it air cool to black and then dunked it in the water barrel so I could handle it. Then I hit it with a wedge. So... My problem is a combination of impatience and stupidity. Maybe I’ll get a chance to try again this weekend.
  3. mpc

    Buy or Pass?

    Where are you in E. WA? t seems like it’s easier to find stuff like this up in the panhandle and in E.WA. Yesterday I saw a listing for a vice in Troy, ID for $75. I was thinking about reaching out to a prof from law school (who lives in Troy) and seeing if he’d pick it up and hold it for me. Then I’d have an excuse to drive up there for a weekend. Man I miss the Palouse. I think I’m going to offer $100 and politely inform them that they’re way above market rate for something used.
  4. It may be because I’m not what you would call “mechanically inclined,” but I can’t picture what this would look like (and Google isn’t helping). Can you explain it as though I were a moron? EDIT: xxxx iPhone. There are like 50 pictures in the anvil category.
  5. Thanks! Unfortunately, I’ve exceeded my available play time for this week (but I had a really good excuse) so I’ll have to see if I can get time to try again this weekend. Maybe if my clients would stop committing crimes I would be better at this whole blacksmithing thing.
  6. It’s a 3 burner propane. I don’t know how old the lining is, what it may have been treated with, or how thick it was (originally). I’ve been futzing with the intakes, putting bricks in front of the door, and stuff to get it hotter but I’m basically just taking stabs in the dark. I didn’t build the forge, I got it for a song from some kid who was moving. I want to pull out the liner and do the insulation again but I never seem to have time to chase that pig.
  7. This is my anvil and base. The base is a big ol’ pine log. Pine was not my first choice (or 2nd or 3rd) but when you live in an area with no trees, you take what you can get. As expected, the log is splitting. I’m wondering if it would be worth it to try to forge some straps to go around the log to keep it together. How would you go about forging such a thing? I was thinking I’d put a 90° bend about an inch from each end of a long piece of 1” wide weld steel, drill holes in the 1” tabs, bang the weld steel to shape right on the log, then tighten it down with a bolt through the holes.
  8. This was cleaned up REALLY well, placed in the forge and heated to a dark red, fluxed (Borax), heated more, fluxed again, then left to heat until it looked (to me) like a bright yellow. Then I banged on it enough to make sure both sides were making good contact. I let it cool to black, then I put it in some water (so I could touch it), ground the edges to see how it looked, and then tested it by banging a screwdriver into the V to see how quick it would split. I’ve had a pistachio give me more trouble coming apart than this.
  9. Thanks! What do you think, thin it out to about 1/2 of that?
  10. We’ll see if it works. I’m guessing it’s going to jump out of the hardy hole but it was a learning experience.
  11. mpc

    Buy or Pass?

    They dropped to $250.
  12. The title says it all. I saw a listing for a 4” post vice thats in decent shape but needs a spring. I’ve never looked into post vices so but the price is well below what I normally see. Assuming everything but needing a new spring is fine, is it a “buy” at $100?
  13. Hmmm... I wonder how long it would take to cook a brat in my forge. It would certainly make it smell a little better.
  14. I came here to ask a similar question. Does anybody have an opinion on wall thickness of the pipe?
  15. Upon closer review, the “1 hp” motor is actually only pushing out 3/4 hp if you’re running on 110. From the OBM website:: The VFD is wired for 110V so the motor produces 3/4hp at 3600rpm which is ample for knife grinding but it can also be rewired for 220V if you wish for the motor to produce 1hp (original instructions for the VFD enclosed).