John B

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About John B

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    Senior Member

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  • Website URL http://www.blacksmithsguild.com

Profile Information

  • Gender Male
  • Location Dawlish, Devon, UK

Converted

  • Location Starcross Devon UK
  • Biography over 40 years engineer and blacksmith
  • Interests promoting and passing on blacksmithing skills
  • Occupation Blacksmith

John B's Activity

  1. John B added a post in a topic: Hello from East Yorkshire, England   

    Ay up Carl, welcome to the site, you need to do a bit of lakin abaht and then have a go.
     
     
    As mentioned previously you can find us in the groups section Blacksmiths Guild UK, If we can be of assistance either bring it up her or cantact me through the website  link for courses.
     
    Good luck wi'  t' new addiction, and have fun.
  2. John B added a post in a topic: Pure Iron Availability?   

    Another UK supplier is  http://www.leggbrothers.co.uk/en/pure-iron/ , they are part of a larger group who supply internationally http://www.allsteelstrading.co.uk/ and were looking to market and distribute in the US a couple of years ago, may be worth an email to see if they have outlets over there.
  3. John B added a post in a topic: first gate project   

     
    If the gate is tight, you could step it back and mount to the rear of the verticals.
  4. John B added a post in a topic: Trying to make an Owl   

    Thank you for the comments, glad to be of some assistance. 
     
     
     
    Regarding the eyes, funny old things eyes, they are recessed and yet pop out, 
     
    With the owls, most have a seemingly flat side at each side of the beak/eye area, and by punching in at that area to create the flats on the round bar, it raises the centre to allow for the beak being created. 
     
    (These could be flat punches with a recessed ball punched centre, much like a domed rivet head snap but with a larger outer area, that would then give bulging eyeballs.)
     
    As for the beak effect , it was done using a small curved chisel, you may be able to see more clearly on this enlarged/doctored pic
     

     
    The incisions also move a little more metal to give a slightly more raised area which fools the eye into thinking its a beak.
     
    Much of animal effects are judged by the eye, and the overall effect, and are not really what they are like, it looks like a beak,  this method also does not leave a sharp pointed area to be a danger area as it would be if you went in with a chisel, an alternative method to raise the beak.
     
    Also makes it more tactile and usable if used on key rings, bottle openers etc.
  5. John B added a post in a topic: Trying to make an Owl   

    Apologies for the delay in posting this response, but I had to retrieve this sample from my old scrap items box, and wire brush it to show details, before taking pics.
     
    Here is the first trial one I made many years ago, and kept as a good sample of a bad job,
     
    Made with similar to the method you appear to have used, but with some glaring faults on,  IE tail/wings being too long, and thus not settling in the correct plane, and the incised 'chest feathers' the wrong way.
     
    This head/winged cowl was not firewelded but some later ones were, I didn't find firewelding necessary, but it did improve the overall look of the finished item, patience is the key of you are going to weld this top area, or you will lose definition on the rear wings details.
     
    You can use a half round swage for support (or the step on the anvil to cutting plate area if your anvil has one) when punching the eyes in to hold it steady.
     
    If there is any marked swelling representing ears is/are present, a few strokes with a hot rasp will solve that problem.
     
    Made from 16mm (5/8") round bar
     
             
     
    Hope this helps, Have fun.
  6. John B added a post in a topic: Questions On Making Tongs   

    Have a look here  http://www.hlcollege.ac.uk/PDF/CraftPublications/Blacksmith/BlacksmithscraftPart5_tcm2-18916.pdf Lesson 37 page 100 on,
     
    Decide what type of jaws you want and allow for that when starting, just practice flat bit first, then you can adjust to suit. once you have the technique, you can adjust sizes for each purpose.
     
    for a rivet, piece of bar, leave 3 x diameter of bar when fitted loose, then heat assembly, dome over from each side progressively, until jaws tight'ish, work jaws to ensure free movement, last few hits, quench and work until cool, then anneal and you should be ready to go.
     
    Have fun
  7. John B added a post in a topic: Glove swap   

    Have you considered the old fashioned "Blacksmiths glove" one off suits right or left hand, fits all sizes, easily removed, made from surplus or old leather aprons.
     
    Cut off a strip sufficient to cover your hand and a half width, and approximately twice the length of wrist to fingertips.
     
    Cut a slit at one end sufficient for your hand to pass through, and use this to protect the palm and fingers of your hand, 
     
    You can then hold with the 'glove' or quickly let it go free, and grip anything needed with your exposed fingers, replace to cover the palm when needed.
  8. John B added a post in a topic: Monckton   

    Bit more information;
     
    Ffos-y-fran welsh dry steam coal   
     
    Welsh Dry Steam is a naturally occurring semi-smokeless fuel - much softer than anthracite, but more clean-burning than house coal.
     
    Usually used to 'raise steam' in railway engines, traction engines and steam-powered boats - also available for domestic use and offered in three sizes - Cobble / Large Nuts / Small Nuts under the trade name of 'Gloda' - produced at the Ffos-y-Fran colliery in South Wales.
  9. John B added a post in a topic: Monckton   

    For an alternative for the long term future, consider this source   http://www.millerargent.co.uk/client_files/default/21942_miller_argent_dry_steam_leaflet.pdf there are agents who will supply to you.
     
    Good reports from people who have used it, it was on sale and to test at the IBF in 2014, and it is not as expensive as the Monckton coke.
  10. John B added a post in a topic: Pitch alternative   

    It works well on 16SWG and also copper, annealing is vital, 
  11. John B added a post in a topic: How to wire wrap to hide weld   

    Smooth/dress any weld down to be flush with the surfaces at both sides of the join.
     
    Then you could try forging one end of the wire to suit the gap on the joint you wish to wrap, bend into a small right angle towards the tip, and lay this into the void in the joint, 
     
    This should give the smooth appearance at one end you require,
     
    Proceed to wrap the joint progressively and tightly using localised heat (oxy/acet) and suitable tongs.
     
    At the end of the wrap, cut off any surplus (from the centreline of the join plus a small allowance, say half the width of one of the bars being joined) then using tongs, bend this end to the centreline of the joint,  and then using a small punch, punch the free end into the joint's gap to match the beginning of the wrap.
     
    You may have to try a couple of times to get the technique to work for you.
     
    Hope this makes some sort of sense and helps, have fun.
  12. John B added a post in a topic: hot zinc spray finish   

    Here are some pictures I have finally managed to try and show the hot zinc spray finish.
     
    This gate was treated in 2004 and so is now over 10 years in service. It has deliberately been left just as sprayed, in an attempt to see exactly how durable and effective it is, and how it copes with small potential water trap areas.
     
     
    The gate is sited in a position which suffers a variety of weather and wind chill combinations and has very minor problems, only two  areas appearing to have a 'rust bleed problem, neither of which I would term serious. 
     
    Gate in situ 
       
     
    The back stile journal clamp and lower pivot were not zinc sprayed, but red oxide primed, the stain is from the occasional oiling to maintain ease of use.
     

     
    The only appreciable rust bleed is here  
     
    From the remaining pictures you can see the potential areas where you may expect a weatherproof seal to be questionable. The areas which have been abraded when the gate is being used show up, but the coating has not been penetrated. They also appear as a bright silvery finish which if done intentionally with a burnishing method appears to have a pewter like smooth finish.
     
                       
     
    The colouring and texture has not changed much since first applied.
     
    Hope this is of assistance and goes someway to answering the original question.
     
  13. John B added a post in a topic: Hector Cole   

    Congratulations to Hector, well deserved,
     
    However, a small correction, the award of the MBE, or OBE does not equate to a knighthood and the privilege of bearing the title Sir, to have that privilege, the award is KBE, equivelant for the ladies is DBE, (Dame)
     
    Terry Pratchett was awarded the OBE in 1998, and awarded/received his KBE (knighthood) in 2009, 
  14. John B added a post in a topic: Set Hammer   

    Thanks for the picture Francis, clarified what your definition is exactly, looks like a version of what I know as a side set, invaluable when making tenons among other uses..
     
     
  15. John B added a post in a topic: Set Hammer   

    Hi Francis, Heal set hammer? An unfamiliar term, could you describe or put up a picture please and what it would normally be used for?

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  1. beth » John B

    thanks for link john - i crawled through your threads in the end and got it - and have now printed alot off - its brilliant thanks! re a leafing course do you think youll be running one next year or sometime? i suppose you need to get some idea about demand... hope all well with you, cheers john beth