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Long time reader, first time poster ^_^

After taking a few blacksmithing lessons and buying an induction heater, I finally got my hands on an anvil. It's about 150lbs and the only thing that looks like an identifying mark is an '8' on the waist, under the horn. It's clearly been used a lot judging by the wear on the table and the front part of the face, but it rings and has great rebound. I've made a few things on it and am very pleased with it so far!

I decided to take it off of the short mount made of pieces of wood and see how it fit on a log round I have. When I flipped it over, I was surprised to see what I can only describe as bubbles in the base. My first thought was that it was the result of significant rust, however, I don't see evidence of that anywhere else on the anvil. I'm going to have to smooth it out a bit before putting it on the new stump.

Have any of you seen anything like this before?  Any guesses as to the manufacturer?

 

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That’s interesting catface, I’ve never come across any anvil that looked like that on the base. 

it has handling holes so it is definitely a forged anvil not cast and I would think that the manufacturer would have pounded every thing flush before finishing the anvil,

my guess and I’m no expert, 

is that it had something mixed in the scrap that was used to build the base that didn’t mesh well with the other scrap and it either rusted out or delaminated from the rest of the material? 

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There’s no need to smooth that out. If you put a layer of silicone caulk between the anvil and the stand, it will both deaden the ring and take care of any irregularities in the fit. (My own anvil has about 1/4” of twist to the underside, and the caulk holds it really well.) You can also do a base filled with sand, which has similar benefits and also is easy adjust for height. 

Also, welcome to IFI!

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Thanks for the suggestions! I hadn't thought about caulking - I'll try that.  I didn't think caulking would make up that much difference, but it's worth a try. Do you use a bathroom caulk or something like a silicone RTV gasket-maker?

The scrap iron delaminating is an an interesting idea. I had considered that as well, but the thickness of the feet -seems- right. There's also no other similar divots elsewhere. I was thinking that maybe it was very old and perhaps had some large inclusions in the original forging that appeared over the years.

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You have a Hay Budden anvil.  This "bubbling" on the base was common during certain times in their production.  I cannot give a reason though.  

Do not smooth anything out.  Use one of the above suggestions, and happy hammering.

 

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9 hours ago, catfacemetalworks said:

Do you use a bathroom caulk or something like a silicone RTV gasket-maker?

Bathroom caulk is fine; whatever's cheap at the hardware store, so long as it's silicone-based.

You don't have to cover the entire bottom surface. A nice thick bead just inside the perimeter will be fine.

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Quote

You have a Hay Budden anvil.  This "bubbling" on the base was common during certain times in their production.  I cannot give a reason though. 

Interesting! I thought it had some of the shape of a Hay Budden but I didn't see any stamps, serial numbers or the additional handling hole under the heel to confirm it. Any guess about the year/decade?

Thanks for the caulking photo JHCC :D

 

(also, thanks for the mod for moving this to the correct forum)

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Early anvils that were built up- from lots of chunks of WI often have some strangeness on the base.  Nothing to be worried about, nothing needs to be done to it before using it!  (Caulk is a great way to deaden sound.)

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