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FieryFurnace

mademoiselle le guillotine

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So I don't speak French, but I did make a guillotine tool. John C. Campbell has several and they are just so nice to use.

Anyway, here is my version. The dies are 3/4x2 1/2 cold rolled steel with the working end being spring steel welded on, hardened, and tempered.
I've only got the 1/2" fuller dies done, but they seem to work pretty good. Any thoughts on using the mild cold rolled stuff for the mass of the die?
I'm working on a butcher die now. It will be made the same way except I'm using leaf instead of coil spring.

DSC02552.jpg

DSC02551.jpg

thoughts?

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A lot of folks size them to take common leaf spring sized material as it's a cheap easily worked and abundant steel The need for it over mild depends a lot on how much and how heavy you use it.

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I tried a 3/8-inch leaf spring die once and it was awfull. I guess I need a bigger leaf spring?

I will probably use it quite a bit, but not with heavy hammers or work. I use a 2 1/2# and a 3# hammer for forging.

Do you have any pictures of a spring device?

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Hi Dave,
I like to use 2" x 1" Mild steel for the tool bodies and face them with spring steel, or sometimes I will just case harden the two faces that are meeting.

Like yourself I found 3/8" and 1/2" blades to be completely unsatisfactory, except as a cut off tool, and I carry 2x1 as a stock item for all sorts of tooling particularly on the fly press.

I find the 1" wide tools ideal as when making tenons etc most fall within the up to 1" long range, and it is no problem to make them longer.

The 1" wide base also allows me to pass through bars to fuller /incise them down the centre.

I also weld on a knocking block to strike on the top tool as they tend to burr over when in use, this way it helps distribute the blow and can be replaced easily if too far gone.

Personally I don't like using springs to keep the jaws open as I prefer to eye and feel the locations when using them, others may have different views.


Here are some pics of one I made and some tooling I use in it.

post-816-0-24094300-1310836437_thumb.jpg post-816-0-23589900-1310836518_thumb.jpg

Basic tools post-816-0-08874100-1310836758_thumb.jpg

and others (also showing side plates profiles) post-816-0-87736900-1310836710_thumb.jpg

These are a fantastic help and replace the need for a traditional striker in a lot of situations.

Mine fits into the anvil, leg vice, or under the treadle hammer.

The more you use them, the more you appreciate them.

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I tried a 3/8-inch leaf spring die once and it was awfull. I guess I need a bigger leaf spring?

I will probably use it quite a bit, but not with heavy hammers or work. I use a 2 1/2# and a 3# hammer for forging.

Do you have any pictures of a spring device?

there was pictures of one posted on the forum a while back was just a cage to hold the spring with a slot in it to catch a pin welded on the back of the top die to hold it open

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Thanks for the pictures Mr. John! I think right off I would prefer the closed style instead of the spring style. Yes you have to pick the die up to get the metal in so you lose a bit of time, but then the tool is in direct contact with the metal concentrating all of the hammer blow into the metal and you get more feel for the work.

Having said that, I've only used the non-spring type so if I got a chance to use one I may end up prefering it.

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look at this one http://web.archive.org/web/20041014213636/keenjunk.com/sketchbk/rw21009.htm
and this one

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I have been thinking of making one of these for making a top and bottom swage for some of my copper work for jewelry(can't afford silver anymore), I just something small scale to draw out a tenon for some of my creations instead of sitting there filing one on, such a waste of time and material. I could also use it for decorative work on bracelets too. Mild steel would work OK for copper but I'd need something harder for brass. <_<

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I have been thinking of making one of these for making a top and bottom swage for some of my copper work for jewelry(can't afford silver anymore), I just something small scale to draw out a tenon for some of my creations instead of sitting there filing one on, such a waste of time and material. I could also use it for decorative work on bracelets too. Mild steel would work OK for copper but I'd need something harder for brass. <_<


If you are only going to use it on jewellery sized items, a straightened out car leafspring should give more than adequate blade width for tenons etc, easily hardened if required. My first prototype was made from an old Land Rover leaf spring 1/2" wide,

I still use it to cut off, shoulder and neck in some times.

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