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I Forge Iron

New Swage Block, 4 1/2 industrial type.


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Just gently tossed this little bad boy in the back of my truck and skipped home.  Marked 4 1/2 on the top face. I think that means its around 230 to 250 Lbs or so. I am considering how I am going to build a stand for this and some of the older posts are unavailable.  I'd love to hear what has worked for all of you.  I have reviewed all of the posts back to 2016 or so where photos are no longer hosted.  My Metal fabrication skills are just ok, so any advanced designs are impractical for me, but I do have an oxy acetylene cutting torch and an underpowered AC stick welder, cutoff saw etc.  I am an OK welder as well.  I have access to some new PT railroad ties which could work for this, but I have to pick them up and if they stink, I'll be passing on that.  Having never used this Block, I'm mostly concerned with how high I mount it, and due to its weight I do not want it falling over.  Thanks for the input.

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How will you be using it most of the time: flat or vertical?  I'm not a fan of PT wood for a stand but vertically oriented dimensional lumber can be used to build a "stump" with a cut out for using it on end as well as one for using it flat.  How will you be flipping it: cherry picker, come-a-long to roof truss, jib crane, forklift,...?

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One of the more interesting swage stands was constructed so it could be positioned flat, or edge up, or other edge  up if it is a different dimension.  There was a goesinta attached to one corner of the stand so a 7 shaped arm could inserted and a winch attached to hoist the swage block for turning to the section you needed for the work at hand.  Attach, crank, lift, turn, and then lower into place.  

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22 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

How will you be using it most of the time: flat or vertical?  I'm not a fan of PT wood for a stand but vertically oriented dimensional lumber can be used to build a "stump" with a cut out for using it on end as well as one for using it flat.  How will you be flipping it: cherry picker, come-a-long to roof truss, jib crane, forklift,...?

I will use it flat the most.  I am thinking I’ll lever it up on a steel ramp from my trailer that I will tack or somehow secure to the stand temporarily.  I can flip it with a 4’ steel rod. Whatever I build, it needs to be stable as I don’t like the idea of it tipping over while levering the swage onto its edge.  My workspace is outdoors so I don’t have a truss to hoist from or a smooth floor for an engine hoist.  I could use a tripod or possibly rent something. 

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I just posted a pic of my swage block stand in another thread, "function of swage blocks vs jigs" or something like that. It's currently standing on edge on the lower shelf as it was for the Nov, 30, 2019, r7.2, earthquake. I think you'll find you'll want more than a 4' lever to move it around, my pinch bar is a bit much but it's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it. 

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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If nothing else to keep you out of the "drop zone".    Look into building a tripod with some sort of good hoist!  That weight is not friendly to play around with!

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