Dwithrow84

First forged item.

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So I finally made something. I have had no training and the only thing I know about forging is learned from videos and a couple of books on blacksmithing. I dont think its complete garbage and know I have lots of room for improvements needs more refinement and has a horible grind. I just wanted to make something. Anyways here it is try not to laugh to hard.

 

20190603_130817.jpg

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I've seen worse. :rolleyes: 

How about buying knife blanks to hone your grinder skills, either send them out to heat treat or practice yourself. Then finish them for gifts, sale, etc. Only climbing one or two learning curves at a time has strong advantages. Trying to build skill at the anvil forging knives tends to run you afoul of heat management issues involved in high carbon steels. HC steels have a more narrow and often unforgiving working temperature range for forging. HC steel fights the hammer more, it's harder to move so requires stronger blows and you don't have as much working time. You can't be getting it HOT and not working it either, see grain growth.

So, if you become proficient forging mild steel, when you start forging blade alloys all you need to learn is THAT heat management for a short easy learning curve. Seriously, you'll already know how to make hot steel go where you want it, a little more fight is just a matter of adjustment not a new skill. 

Make sense?

RR spikes are good stock and make very marketable product, they just aren't any good for knives. The steel is too low carbon so unless you want to weld in a high carbon bit they're good for letter openers and knife shaped objects. Wall hangers.

However spikes make good garden tools, BBQ steak flippers are very marketable. Coat hooks, drawer pulls, etc. etc. What makes them so marketable as stock is most everybody recognizes a RR spike for what it is so when you forge it into something else they can SEE the plastic transition you have wrought with fire and hammer. Yes?

RR spikes also twist wonderfully. Check out the section of twists here, some are spectacular.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Not laughing at all, looks solid for a first project.

 

My kids love making RR "knives".  The steel moves well under the hammer and grinds easy; and all of it builds skill and muscle memory.  Keep at it sir!

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Have you tried making a split/ Franklin's cross? Maybe the next time you light up the forge?

Good job fullering the transition from blade to handle material. Many spike knifes do not really have that.

Pnut

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Try "spread cross," for search terms.

Frosty The Lucky.

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do you guys think it would be okay to use a low carbon steel to practice on. For blanks if I only plan to practice grinding and stock removal I thought maybe I could use like rolled steel from lowes to keep the cost low since I will most likely jack it up.

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You mean rather than pay Lowes excessive prices rather than using free leaf springs which are a decent blade steel? This lowers the cost how?

And if you have one turn out alright you can practice your heat treat as well!

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Sure, practice is practice though it needs to be GOOD practice to improve yourself.

No matter how you make the preform, buy blanks, cut them out with a torch or forge them you MUST practice stock removal to turn it into a knife. 

Even if you're using: scrapers, files, stones and sand paper it's stock removal.

And there's Thomas, I won't repeat him.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Search split cross. 

The steel suppliers near me has twenty foot bars of 3/8 hot rolled 1018 for about 20 bucks. TSC has 3 foot sections of hot rolled mild steel for about 5.99. look for a steel supplier near you or a scrap yard or mechanic to get leaf/coil springs for cheap to free.

Hot filing is your friend if you don't have power tools when making stock removal blades, but as  previously stated heat and no hammering equals grain growth in high carbon steel. 

Pnut

 

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I've got a few coil springs and I can get leaf springs from the shop but i'd have to cut them, heat and flatten them. We've got a few steel places here in town but they only sell mild steel. we have a TSC too. I thought buying the cheap hot rolled steel would be a low cost way to practice without having to fire up the forge and waste the gas. I mean I don't mind firing up the forge I enjoy it but if I'm just practicing stock removal and bevels and not producing finished products i'd rather not waste the fuel.

 

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A steel supplier will have mild steel for about half the cost of the big box stores. You might have to buy twenty feet of it depending on if they sell off drops,or remnants. The place by me will sell to the public in any quantity. 

Pnut

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Find a spring pack that uses flat springs.  Preferably a small one close in size to what you want to practice on.  Or if you are really feeling your oats try a double edged blade and practice grinding 4 good bevels---bwahahahahahahahahaha

How is your draw filing?

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On 6/7/2019 at 5:02 PM, Dwithrow84 said:

if I'm just practicing stock removal and bevels

Unless your grinder has a gasoline engine practicing stock removal doesn't burn anything but lunch.

I'm in Alaska and a 20' stick of 3/8" sq. HR runs about $23 last I bought. The guys in the yard will cut to transport for you. do NOT ask at the counter they have to charge by the cut. The guys in the yard just do it. If they won't get out your hack saw and start cutting, half way decent technique will part it in maybe 30 seconds. However if you're parked at the loading dock and using it as a table to saw on, the guys will whack it to get you out of the way. Be sure to say thank you sincerely. 

I start folks on 3/8" sq. HR. it's large enough to hold heat for a little while and a student's mistakes aren't permanent with the first blow. 1/2" HR sq. is 2x the stock and work per inch. 

Why sq. rather than round? forging sq. is a good way to practice your 90* wrist turn as square is already established to help you out.

Hmmmm?

Frosty The Lucky.

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Yup, saving my pennies for a grinder upgrade myself.  But honestly, the best investment is using your time to practice with a purpose.  Besides, my harbor fraud 1x30 hasnt wore out yet, and a new tool wont make me grind my bevels any cleaner.  But it does look like a knife!

 

 

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