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I've just gotten a bar of 1095 and plan on making several medium to large knives from it. Any input on hings like heat treating? I've heard that 1095 can be finicky with somethings but everyone says different things about different steel. I can't forge yet so I've just been doing stock removal.

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read the  pinned posts about heat treating ?  and this one ?

 

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Forgive me, im still getting used to the site and realize this is the wrong thread to be asking heat treating questions. i saw a previous post where you said "1095 likes a short soak time before the quench" im a little confused what exactly you mean by a short soak time, and will this be any significance to me since  i will not be forging the steel.

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why ask if you have not read it yet?  but for one because this IS a blacksmith site, and second because you asked about heat treating is why.    Forging a knife is a different animal entirely

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is there a way to relocate this post to the heat treating thread? if so ill gladly do it 

 

It has been relocated

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How a steel is heat treated to get certain properties is not usually dependent on how it was processed as much as which alloy it it.

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...so, just to clarify, they are saying YES. The short soak time still applies as do all the other procedures for heat treating 1095, except normalizing and annealing, which was already done before you bought the steel.

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I might still normalize if the grind was very asymetric or strange. (Just as a help to keep it straighter in the hardening step)

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"Soak" in this context refers to time spent at temperature.  In this case it is the amount of time spent at, or just above, critical temperature before quenching.

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