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I Have an Anvil, now what?


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We are the proud owners of my father-in-law's anvil. It is very old and has been in the family for years. It weighs 96lbs.  I can find no marks on it, any idea how old it is, who made it, etc? What might it be worth if we decide to sell it? Thanks ahead for any responses.

 

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Greetings Merlin,

 

Looks to be an early English anvil...  Pre 1860...  I would clean it up real good and look close for any identification..   Normally you will find the stone weight numbers on the side...   It could be a Mouse Hole Forge.. 

 

Jim

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My understanding is that a good quality anvil would have a fair price range of $2-$3 per pound... and also depends on scarcity of anvils in your area... which would be a good thing to put in your profile so it shows up... never know, someone may be right around there who would be happy to either help you start in the direction of learning how to use the anvil the way it was meant to be... or take it off your hands.

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No markings is odd, most of the good ones have some sort of marks, Have you had a good look with the steel brush and a little bit of water to clean up the side.

Does it have a nice long ring when you hit it with hammer?  Is the rebound any good  when you drop a ball bearing on it?

Id say your not looking at making a mint off it if you sell it, face looks like its copped it a bit and a chunk missing (hard to see from pics)

Is response to your "now what?" question, put it on a mount and start using it.

Heat it and beat it like it owes you money :D

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Thanks so much for your replies. How interesting, didn't know an anvil had so much history. I did as you suggested, hubby and I went out this AM, hosed it down, and I could not believe it, didn't see the marking before(and I hunted for them). On it side there they were. They are worn but looks like maybe a C a dot then a 3 another dot then 15. Does this make sense to anyone?

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Greetings Merlin,

 

Thats what I thought....  Its called stone weight...  It means that you have a 99 pound anvil..  I could explain it but you can look it up on this forum..

If you look real close on the bottom you might find operating instructions...  LOL

 

Jim

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No instructions on the bottom Jim, lol.

 

Greetings Merlin,

 

Thats what I thought....  Its called stone weight...  It means that you have a 99 pound anvil..  I could explain it but you can look it up on this forum..

If you look real close on the bottom you might find operating instructions...  LOL

 

Jim

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Merlin: Jim just likes looking at anvil bottoms and craves company in his eccentricities. Humoring him doesn't hurt anything, we all do it. <evil snicker>

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks K, I did find the numbers and dots, cool stuff. I find it very interesting, and to think of the history these have seen. My F-I-L has passed so I have no idea where it came from. It has been well used to look at it, would love it if it could talk.

I have a Mousehole anvil that is similar in a few points...wire brush the side with horn pointing to your right.Look for dots and numbers and I think you've got it.

kuvash

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Great looking older(ancient like me) anvil! First off DO NOT take a grinding disk to any part of this anvil, that would be a desecration to this fine old anvil, a wire wheel is OK but not a grinding disk. Trust me on this, it is fine the way it is and it sure don't need fixed, it ain't broke. If you ever feel the need to "fix it" in any way start looking for a bigger newer anvil, this one is good the way it is. You can make just about anything you need to as a beginner on it. When you gain more experience and want to do bigger projects where you need to use a 10 pound sledge hammer DON'T!, this light anvil is not made for that heavy work, it is a light duty anvil. This anvil has been around since before the Civil War and all it has done has provided is good quality work for about 160 years so if someone tries to convince you to "fix" it tell them it "ain't broke". OK, that's the end of my sermon now go light off the forge and get some steel hot and forge out something, it's good for the soul!!

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merlin,google and type in Mousehole anvil you should see a site with a forum ABANA or something like that and a person has listed all the years of mfg if that is in fact what you have. Mine for instance reads as best I can tell

M&H

ARMTAGE

MOUSE

HOLE

FORGE

0.3.7

which,according to the info at that forum was manufactured between 1854-1875. it came from my wife's family's ranch up in Arcata,Ca......now I use it and I am it's "caretaker" as well,I guess.

kuvash

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Thanks for the interesting info on this piece. I won't be taking a grinding wheel to it, how about a brillo pad? I'd like to clean it up but don't want to hurt it any. As for pounding on it, won't be doing any of that either. Lol. Thanks again.

Great looking older(ancient like me) anvil! First off DO NOT take a grinding disk to any part of this anvil, that would be a desecration to this fine old anvil, a wire wheel is OK but not a grinding disk. Trust me on this, it is fine the way it is and it sure don't need fixed, it ain't broke. If you ever feel the need to "fix it" in any way start looking for a bigger newer anvil, this one is good the way it is. You can make just about anything you need to as a beginner on it. When you gain more experience and want to do bigger projects where you need to use a 10 pound sledge hammer DON'T!, this light anvil is not made for that heavy work, it is a light duty anvil. This anvil has been around since before the Civil War and all it has done has provided is good quality work for about 160 years so if someone tries to convince you to "fix" it tell them it "ain't broke". OK, that's the end of my sermon now go light off the forge and get some steel hot and forge out something, it's good for the soul!!

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A Brillo pad is fine but a wire brush is a lot less work. No grinding, good it doesn't deserve it.

 

Why NOT build a fire and do some forging? THINK a lady can't be a blacksmith? I'll be more than happy to introduce you with one who'd a world class blacksmith. There are a number of really excellent women on IFI plying the craft. Blacksmithing is less about strength than it is about accuracy, planning and smarts.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Don't doubt that women can't be a blacksmith, I just never thought about it, I do admire and respect the craft though. If I start another hobby my husband will kill me, lol.  

A Brillo pad is fine but a wire brush is a lot less work. No grinding, good it doesn't deserve it.

 

Why NOT build a fire and do some forging? THINK a lady can't be a blacksmith? I'll be more than happy to introduce you with one who'd a world class blacksmith. There are a number of really excellent women on IFI plying the craft. Blacksmithing is less about strength than it is about accuracy, planning and smarts.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Greetings again Merlin.

 

Frosty is right we need more ladies in our craft...  I have lady friends that are some of the best smiths I have ever seen...   I once took a friend ( non blacksmith) to a meet where some of the lady smiths were there...  My friend was worried and ask me about their safety with all the rough looking guys that were there..   I laughed and told him that when you become one of us we all have hammers and protect our own..  I think lady blacksmiths are protected better than Fort Knox.. I suggest you find a local blacksmith group and give it a test drive ...  In PA you have a super school.  Touchtone Center For the Crafts. Log on an take a look...  All that and it did not come from the bottom of your new anvil..

 

Jim

 

Frosty,  I set up the earlier statement for this one..... 

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Don't doubt that women can't be a blacksmith, I just never thought about it, I do admire and respect the craft though. If I start another hobby my husband will kill me, lol.  

 

He ain't going to kill you, you'll have a HAMMER. Besides all you need to do is make him something, anything, he'll love it, it's part of the deal. this is a good thing to think about. If Hubbage gripes think about something expensive to replace one of his toys with. <wink>

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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You guys are a hoot, too funny.

He ain't going to kill you, you'll have a HAMMER. Besides all you need to do is make him something, anything, he'll love it, it's part of the deal. this is a good thing to think about. If Hubbage gripes think about something expensive to replace one of his toys with. <wink>

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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An appreciative audience, something to be cherished by a born comedian. Well that and a good straight line, it's REALLY hard to think of something better than a good straight line. :rolleyes:

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Do what I do with a new hobby. (and I've got a couple, distance running, knitting, made a crossbow, brewing, beekeeping, cross-stitch...)

 

Drop or draw back on a couple of the other hobbies for awhile, keep it cheap at first, and if possible, get him into it too so he has some ownership in the new hobby.

 

Let him move some hot steel under the hammer and shape it a couple of times, it's fun and addictive as all get out.

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