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I Forge Iron

Punching Hammer Eyes on the Hydraulic Press


gearhartironwerks

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Nice work. Looks like the lube and coal dust really make a difference. I abandoned this technique on my press because my h13 slitting punch kept getting hung up, and it seemed to really cut up my punch after just one hole. I may try it again after seeing this and use coke dust and lube.

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Nice work. Looks like the lube and coal dust really make a difference. I abandoned this technique on my press because my h13 slitting punch kept getting hung up, and it seemed to really cut up my punch after just one hole. I may try it again after seeing this and use coke dust and lube.


You might try heat treating your H13 punch using the following suggestion. If you have a heat treat oven, or access to one: 1950 deg for 1 hr, quench in oil, then temper at 1000-1050 deg for 2 hrs. I know it sounds wacky compared with what we normally do, but this is what works. Look up Diehl Steel and check out the graph on tempering hardness. It's amazing that H13 actually gets harder at 1000k.

Also, the bottom of the punch needs to be flat. I go to within 1/4" of the bottom of the material...white line on the punch in the vid is the indicator. Coal dust really works as does the Hofi lube to cool the punch.

John
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Nice set up John-
Would you mind sharing a picture of the whole press? I'm also interested in what set up you use for tool holding.
Thanks


Here you go. Pretty basic and not too pretty, but it works! I have about $600.invested with some good scrounging and am using the same power unit as the H frame press with a different control valve and a diverter valve.

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Here you go. Pretty basic and not too pretty, but it works! I have about $600.invested with some good scrounging and am using the same power unit as the H frame press with a different control valve and a diverter valve.



Some more pics. I stopped using the Hofi jig and made an adjustable backstop. Also, the punch in the picture has been changed to a shorter, more stout one.

John

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Great pictures- Very helpful

Thanks John-

Ya Strippers... Gotta love them.

I want to know more about the hot punch!

Specifically welding the h-13. I have never welded it. should I give everything a good preheat (black heat or is that to hot) to weld then work up the temper? Do you use a drift on the press to size the hole?

I like the portable foot control! Thats slick...

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Great pictures- Very helpful

Thanks John-

Ya Strippers... Gotta love them.

I want to know more about the hot punch!

Specifically welding the h-13. I have never welded it. should I give everything a good preheat (black heat or is that to hot) to weld then work up the temper? Do you use a drift on the press to size the hole?

I like the portable foot control! Thats slick...


I just mig welded it to a plate, heat treated the punch/plate to H13 specs, then welded the plate to the 2" heavy wall tube. So far, so good.

After the initial punching, I go to the H frame press and drift the hole larger, then on to the power hammer to draw out the cheeks with a mandrel in place.

I'll try to put together a vid of that process in the next week or so.

John
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John- a couple things- Are you serious- cast fittings on your pressure lines? Are my eyes deceiving me? I know 1000 psi may do the work but have you put a gauge on it?

Do you have much if any draft on the punch? I too read that forging magazine article and it seems like one could go either way.

I was going to go Randy's way on the two-pedal approach but came upon a different solution quite by accident; When I mounted my valve (std. Prince valve) I never noticed it was upside-down. Only after plumbing it did I realize the hand control was backwards~! However, when I went to make a foot pedal I realized a rocker foot pedal would (and did) work. Forward roll of the foot is pressure, rock it back and release. There's no linkage other than that connecting it to the spool and no taking your foot off the pedal. I'll try to get pix soon.

Great work, BTW. I'm trying to catch up to y'all!

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John- a couple things- Are you serious- cast fittings on your pressure lines? Are my eyes deceiving me? I know 1000 psi may do the work but have you put a gauge on it?

Do you have much if any draft on the punch? I too read that forging magazine article and it seems like one could go either way.

I was going to go Randy's way on the two-pedal approach but came upon a different solution quite by accident; When I mounted my valve (std. Prince valve) I never noticed it was upside-down. Only after plumbing it did I realize the hand control was backwards~! However, when I went to make a foot pedal I realized a rocker foot pedal would (and did) work. Forward roll of the foot is pressure, rock it back and release. There's no linkage other than that connecting it to the spool and no taking your foot off the pedal. I'll try to get pix soon.

Great work, BTW. I'm trying to catch up to y'all!


I have to honestly tell you...I don't know a xxxxxx thing about the technical aspects about cast fittings, except that at 2-2.5k pressure, they work. The 2 pedal approach was a modification I came up with to eliminate the necessity of doing it by hand. I want my hands free to manipulate the material and not worry about both at the same time. I'm really open to a better arrangement, but at this point, am happy with the workings as they are. Also, as an aside, the two pedal system works for me...as a senior citizen...because sometimes...xxxx, I hate to admit it, I need the distance between the pedals to remember where I am. :)

JE
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OK, on the cast fittings. My press has them too. They have a stamp or mold impression of 3000 on them at the bend. Does that mean they are rated at 3000 psi? I was just assuming it did but you know what happens when you assume- you make an ASS out of U and ME Sorry Glenn/mods

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The cast fittings are a big no no John.... steel fittings only on the pressure side, only use cast for the suction and low pressure lines.. Its one of those things that will work just fine clear up till it kills you...


The pipe/fittings on my foot control are galvanized whatever...
While I appreciate your concern, at the low pressure (2-2.5k) I'm running, I doubt that it's a problem. I'm not going to lose any sleep over it. :)

JE
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OK- just checking on the lines. I only express concern since I'm now experienced~. If one hasn't had the joy of fittings coming apart under pressure I highly recommend it- NOT! My Anyang rivet press has some crazy Metric fine threads that required an adapter to NPT. The first pair was a ferrule type fitting- BOOM! The second pair was a brazed pair from a reputable hydraulic shop in Spokane- BOOM! This was at 12GPM at 2500psi. If the hose whip didn't get me the 25' stream of oil was bad enough. The ferrule slipped on the first one, the brazed joint failed on the second. Cast may be stronger- or is it? "Cast Iron is unsuitable for lines subjected to expansion strains, contraction and vibration unless the pipe is very heavy" Machinery's handbook 1953

We also remember that cast is unbelievable strong in compression (150,000psi), weak as hell in tension (as low as 16,000 psi).

FE-Wood- your 3000 psi fitting is most likely a forged steel fitting. Take a spark test and see.

I got dissed on our other site because my hands were too close to a lathe. I know we could say if you don't like metalwork you could find a new profession but the bottom line is - Play safe! :) The machined fittings are cheap..

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