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I Forge Iron

Scrapped Truck parts


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Does anybody know what the s-cams out of a log truck might be for steel? Have a few we've swapped out at work, thinking hammers or drifts if I get ambitous. Have a broken axle and understand it's 4120 or 4320. Still collecting odds an ends getting things setup.

thanks for your time...

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Not much help here, other than I have strings of kinfolks that are loggers. Most everything on a log truck that sees hard work is most likely 4140 alloy or better. Being tough is better than being hard, and breaking like glass. There's a tapered pin somewhere on a log truck, I think it keeps the bunks on the frame from swiveling when not loaded. Anyway, that pin makes a passable cone hardy if you weld a piece of square stock on the bottom that fits in your hardy hole. Sorry I don't know what S-cams are, I try really hard to stay dumb about log trucks, Gyppo loggers get in from the woods at 11:00 pm and need to be rolling again at 3;30 am, I get my favorite sleep in during their down time, and loggers are worse than lawyers about paying their bills at the end of the month.

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I'll have to keep the carrot in mind if I ever find another as roadkill. :) The s-cams are the shaft that goes between the brakes shoes and the air pots. Most are 24" in length and around 1 1/2" dia, and expect to be fairly good stuff for the amount of torsion on them.

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Trucks,and cars have lots of good material to work with. Torsion bars, leaf springs, coil springs, hood springs, trunk springs, valve springs, valves, axles, steering shafts, sway bars, center links, tie rods, rack and pinions, the solid radio antennas, brake and clutch pedal linkages, shifters, shift linkage, transmission shafts, bearings of all sorts, and lots of sheetmetal.

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while cars, trucks, loaders, and such are built to last when something is being replaced there is a reason for it all of the tool steel parts are subject to cyclic fatigue keep in mind many parts coming off machinery have been put through millions of cycles over their lifetime. many pieces like this will will have cracks open up when you start forging it down to shape. resulting in a dangerous tool which is likely to break chip or crack. as a word of warning while the tools can be great and functional only use new steel for tools for others to use or for tools to be used in public. remember people have lawyers and use them irresponsibly this is why many scrap yards are shut down to the public.

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Well the deal with the s-cams is the S portion that spreads the drums gets worn and the brakes don't actuate fully or the two spots where nylon bushings ride get badly worn from operator neglect (failure to grease). Neither pesent much in the way of cyclic fatigue. But yes, that is duly noted. And I see a lot less in the way of lawyers here in Canada than what people have down to the south of us...

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