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I got the same pop-up but clicked on the "close" button and read through the article. pretty good and a much smaller versoin of what I do.
55-gallong drum with holes in the bottom. when fire is going good and smokeless (this means hot) I bury the bottom and put a lid on it. Lid has a 2 inch hole in the center. when the smoke comes out looking like playdough I lite it with a zippo and watch the fire from st. elmo. when that goes out I cap the hole and let it go for a day. I have a 55 gallon drum full of useable charcoal after a weeks worth of burning. very low maintenance.

just make real sure that the coals are out when you put them in your storage container. if there is even a little ember in there, the next time you open the lid you will have nothing but a pile of ash. Don't ask me how I know.

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I clicked on the URL and got a fireworks article and a request to subscribe to their pay-for articles! :(


prolly just the pop up for the newsletter, which is free, but I have pop up blockers so...

Yea it is a pyrotechnics article, but, charcoal is charcoal in the end :P

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Be very sure it's out before bringing charcoal into your smithy. you do NOT want, "all that's left is a pile of ash," to be a description of your smithy and maybe home!

My preference is to store charcoal in an airtight, fireproof container outdoors just because.

Frosty

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Darn straight Frosty. I have a separate drum with locking lid out back for mine

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Here are a few photos of my setup. It's more efficient than just a drum with holes in it, but still takes a lot of fuel to char a full load of Blackbutt and Casuarina.The square tubing under the drum has holes for the volatile gases driven off the load of wood to pass out and burn.

I think next time I do a batch I'll make a bit of an enclosure from bricks to insulate the whole thing a bit.

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Great ideas. My exp with the 55 gal drum in some really bad distortion, so after the first use it would begin to leak and burn more of my char.
Im interested in the old disel tank, thats awesome! I might be able to get one.
Thanks

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Definitely, enclose your retort, only a small % of the heat is going into it burning in the open like that.

Be VERY VERY careful messing with fuel tanks. Diesel and heating oil tanks are explosive even with professional precautions and expertise they can kill you.

Find something else unless you are trained and have the proper equipment to purge and clean the tanks.

Frosty

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Of course, You would fill a fuel drum with water before cutting with any torch. At lease stuffing a cold hair dryer or even car exuast to blow some fumes for 15-20 minutes if your going to cut it with a grinder.

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Of course, You would fill a fuel drum with water before cutting with any torch. At lease stuffing a cold hair dryer or even car exuast to blow some fumes for 15-20 minutes if your going to cut it with a grinder.


And you stand a very good chance of blowing yourself to kingdom come.

About 20 years ago Anchorage Automatic Welding had a job welding up a couple 4" cracks in the skid flanges on a 10,000gl fuel tank. They steamed it for a week, gave it a day's worth of high pressure detergent wash and another two days of steam.

No air in a tank that's had live steam blowing into it for two days, after a day's worth of professional oil field, fuel oil specific detergent pressure washing after a week's worth of live steam. Right?

With the steam still going in the tank, the welder struck the arc and the explosion blew the guy on top tending the steam stingers through the roof, killing him instantly. Blew the roof off the 60' x 120' building, bowed all the walls out, some as much as 12'. One end of the tank landed in a parking lot across the street about 150' away. The weldor and helper survived as did the other employees who had been waiting across the street in the parking lot where the tank end landed. The explosion was heard in Eagle River about 13 miles away.

And I won't even tell you the story about what happened to the state's heavy duty shop the last time someone tried welding a fuel tank. He was a professional and took professional precautions too.

So no, I do not think your precautions are adequate.

Is your life insurance?

Frosty

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Im just sticking with my realm of small drums and tanks filled with water. 10,000 gallon tank... yea probally would not try filling that with water.
Thanks for the warning

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I am building one similar, using a large pizza oven style outer shell, and 2 x 44gal drums as the chambers. will post pics when its finished

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