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Hobart Handler 140 Welder for Tire Hammer Build?


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I'd think it was a tad small.  3/16" is the thickest it can handle with flux cored wire.  While you can make multiple passes it just doesn't have the amps to really dig in.  I'd think you'd want to stick weld it just because you'll need a 200amp + mig to do the job.  There are also things like duty cycle which is how long the machine can weld in a 10 min period (30% @ 90amps = 3 min out of 10).

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I'd just rent a little stick welder, I'll bet $100/day would get you more welder than you need and you wouldn't be having to make multiple passes with such an undersized welder. Maybe, MAYBE use it to tack up the sections where pulling isn't a big issue.

90-100amps, 7018 stick, faster, easier and better. At least call around and see what renting a little Honda or whatever portable welder costs.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Check out the Everlast inverter welder.  After seeing how well the Miller inverter welders worked (using it on 1/2" plate) I started looking at them because I had a job that required hauling a welder around on a steep hill side.  After reading the reviews I thought I would give the Everlast a try at 1/4 the price.  This machine rocks.  $270.00 and it weighs about the same as a case of beer.

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Tho the Hobart will weld circles around a Miller (despite having the same ratings the Miller will trip out a lot more if your pushing hard against the duty cycle) 1/4" with gas shielding and short welds is the practical limit (pre heating is a good idea at the upper limit as is making a tin can shroud to convert the cooling fan to a ducted fan) it certainly will disappoint you trying to weld 3/8"+. A yard sale tome stone will do you better, or a 220 Hobart mig. 

I'm certainly not a welder, despite having 5 diferent units ;-)

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On April 25, 2016 at 10:45 AM, Charles R. Stevens said:

Tho the Hobart will weld circles around a Miller (despite having the same ratings the Miller will trip out a lot more if your pushing hard against the duty cycle) 1/4" with gas shielding and short welds is the practical limit (pre heating is a good idea at the upper limit as is making a tin can shroud to convert the cooling fan to a ducted fan) it certainly will disappoint you trying to weld 3/8"+. A yard sale tome stone will do you better, or a 220 Hobart mig. 

I'm certainly not a welder, despite having 5 diferent units ;-)

This is what I'm finding out, and it makes sense to me now.  New projects = new learning opportunities.

I'm now looking at inexpensive stick welders to purchase or rent.  The Everlast PowerARC 140 (which I think is what LawnJockey is referring to) looks interesting at $256 from Home Depo.  Says a 140 amp max at 240V (100 amp at 120V).  I'm thinking that the 35% duty cycle would be fine if I just plan on taking my time with it.  I'm also thinking that 120V might not be practical to weld 1/2", but not sure.

Again, thanks everyone for the input and feedback.

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On 4/25/2016 at 10:45 AM, Charles R. Stevens said:

Tho the Hobart will weld circles around a Miller (despite having the same ratings the Miller will trip out a lot more if your pushing hard against the duty cycle) 1/4" with gas shielding and short welds is the practical limit (pre heating is a good idea at the upper limit as is making a tin can shroud to convert the cooling fan to a ducted fan) it certainly will disappoint you trying to weld 3/8"+. A yard sale tome stone will do you better, or a 220 Hobart mig. 

I'm certainly not a welder, despite having 5 diferent units ;-)

Hobart is owned by the same parent company as Miller now.  All a Hobart is now is a stripped down Miller, the migs even use the same consumables.  They do this to compete with Lincoln in the big box market as the Lincolns sold in those stores are made cheaper and in Mexico. 

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Aperently holbart is still using Hobart internals not Lincoln internals despite being owned buy the same company. Caught me by surprise to. The folks at the local welding supply (who do repairs) told me that Hobart was still made in the us (not sure I would take that to the bank) but the carbon pile and the thermal limited switch are different part numbers (aftermarket) Even with modifications to move more cooling air to keep that dang switch cool my Miller trips out much more often than dad's Hobart (and yes I replaced the god's rotted switch, maybe I would retrofit a Hobart switch...). Can't coment as to Lincoln, as I don't use one. 

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I too have an under-powered welder... Here's what I do: Cut, fit, and tack everything up with my little 110 machine, then take the project to the shop to run hotter welds with borrowed time on an adequate machine. The same method would work well to cut down on rental time. It's nice to just crank it up and go fast when everything is already set up. 

Our little welders aren't useless on big projects, they're just not capable of doing everything.

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  • 1 month later...

Miller and the Hobart brand are both owned by ITW. When Hobart was acquired by them in the mid 90s, (not sure on an exact date IIRC anyways) ITW took the light industrial/homeowner part of the company and Thermal Dynamics, the heavy industrial part. This is why a number of offerings with both the Hobart and Thermal Dynamics branding looked identical. Sanrex manufactured the inverter machines for TD then and were the first to develop the waveshape technology currently offered by Miller and Lincoln on their flagship TIG inverter machines (soft square, adv square, triangle wave). The acquisition of Miller Electric by Illinois Tool Works was in 1994 IIRC.

Contrary to what some believe, the Hobart brand of machines (manufactured by Miller Electric) are NOT exactly the same as their Miller counterparts. As was mentioned above, Hobart machines in such categories are built with lesser quality components, and often have reduced duty cycles and output ratings. This isn't to say that the Hobart line of machines are junk by a long shot. They are, however the "budget" line of machines offered by ITW, and are focused on the homeowner, hobbiest market. The Ironman MIG machines are quite well made and offer a lot of features for the money versus their Miller cousins which are much more expensive. Many of Millers and Hobarts offerings are assembled in Miller's Appleton, WI plant with globally sourced components. Since ITWs acquisition of Maxal filler metals an others, they are rebranding these products with the Hobart name as well, since it's a known and trusted brand in the welding industry. Of course, branding and marketing of such things is better left to another discussion.

As far as welding the materials for the OPs project, the key factor will be the skill level the person putting it together possesses. If he is proficient with SMAW (stick welding) then, any old Lincoln AC tombstone with 7018 AC, or 6011/6013 electrodes will do the job fine. You can buy a used one just about anywhere, and often for $100 or less. There are many options as far as larger MIG machines go, and many different brands to chose from. My one piece of advice as someone who repairs welding machines and sells them for a living would be is to put your money in something with a good resale value, and a proven customer service network (if purchasing new). On the opposite end of the spectrum, some of the import offerings aren't a bad deal for what you spend, but at the same time keep in mind that with some of them, their warranty and post sale support may leave much to be desired. If you know that going in, it makes reaching a decision much easier. There are many options as far as a used purchase goes, but again, are probably better left for another discussion being the amount of factors involved.

Good luck with your project. 

IMHO of course

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