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I Forge Iron

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here is a video I made of me doing some work with our 25lbs little giant. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1ZOJBaBn5E

 this hammer was built I Minnesota , in 1916 and is considered an old style. it came to us from the original blacksmith shop in one of our local towns. other than a new spring, and a couple of miscellaneous small parts, it is completely original.  works wonderfully!

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She runs nicely Ethan, looks tight and smooth. Don't attach too much to having original parts, these things were designed to be rebuilt many times over. That they last as long as they do is testament to their design.

My  50lb. LG was delivered in January 1913 and looks very much like yours. I lube mine with chain saw bar oil with Dura Lube added. The Dura Lube is an automotive engine oil additive to reduce friction especially on start up before the oil pump comes to pressure. It's sticky and slippery I've been using it in my chainsaws for decades and haven't had to replace a bar since starting. I also use grease on the hammer guides rather than oiling them, it doesn't sling or ooze like oil.

One last tip. When you're drawing a bar under flat dies like in the video. Start at the end and move inwards about half the die width per stroke. This way the dies are hitting half as much steel per strike so it's hitting with twice the psi doing more work. Moving in half the die width maintains this same general PSI per strike. You get more work and the hammer works half as hard. Everybody is happy.

When you get to the point of plannishing the drawn section is time to work from the shoulder to the end of the bar. The die will draw the step down till it hits the the next step and stop. This will give you a nice even smooth finish.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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Looking good, but add a brake!  Especially when using top tools, the brake adds a great amount of control and safety.  All of the higher quality industrial hammers had them and for good reasons.  

If your punch starts to stick like that you can gently forge the sides of the workpiece and that will help loosen it up.  

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