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I Forge Iron

Anvil fabrication


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After looking at the pictures on the link and thinking that you are manufacturing your own anvil rather than spend the money on one... have you considered the fact that you will definitely spend more money on rods, grinding wheels and electricity than what a decent used one is worth? I am including the fact that the base material is free! I am probrably just as 'thrifty' as the next guy, though we should still be pragmatic.

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Last year 4 of us got togeather and forged a 160 lb anvil ,if several of like minded smiths got use of a bigish hammer you could make a anvil each ,we made it in pices the ,block with dog holes welded the feet on ,and then made the top section out of 5 in billet and welded at the waist ,the job needed little grinding .

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Daryl, I had been looking for a decent used anvil. Unfortunatly the only ones that I've been able to find seem to be priced like gold, big bucks a new one would be about the same price. The electric cost is a non issue to me. Welding rod, I've got an old 50Lb box that I'm using up, mixed 7014 & 7018. The way that the welds are flowing in I think that the amount of grinding will be minimal. I'm going with the it's ugly but effective rule here.
My welder is a recent aquisition it's a Miller CST-250 DC stick/tig rig. I'm running about 175 amps with 1/8 7018 and 7014. The 7018 is getting saved for building the face because it flows out smooth and work hardens with piening as it's cooling. I'm using 7014 for the body because it's a fast fill rod (iron powder in the flux). Both rods when the heat is right and a steady hand are darn near self chipping.
Yesteryearforge, It's more of a sanity break.

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Thanks for the offer on the loaner anvil but I hate borrowing/loaning tools. The little anvils are just a bit small for me. I have been swinging 4lb hammers for years. I'm not sure but I think that I'll be going to a smaller hammer when this mass of iron is done.
WOW Dr Dean, you got alotta you-know-whats!!!!!!!!
Am I doing a bad thing by posting this or is it that I'm willing to try?

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You know what they say about best laid plans, it never works out. Since my last post we've all been sick, strep throat has run through the family but we're all better now.
I realized today that it's a good thing that I rarely work with blueprints because my projects go through a evolution process. Yesterday the north shop at work was doing some house cleaning. I found a junk flywheel in my truck at the end of the day, hmmmm looks like a anvil stand. I also have a chunk of 4" square tube. What I'm thinking of doing is to weld the tube to the flywheel then weld one of the full round pieces of 1.25" to the top of the square tube. Then flip the base over, pack the square tube with sand and cap the bottom. I'm thinking of using one of the full round discs for my anvil base instead of making feet that look more traditional. Hopefully I can get some pics tomorrow or saturday to show what I'm thinking.

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After looking at the pictures on the link and thinking that you are manufacturing your own anvil rather than spend the money on one... have you considered the fact that you will definitely spend more money on rods, grinding wheels and electricity than what a decent used one is worth? I am including the fact that the base material is free! I am probrably just as 'thrifty' as the next guy, though we should still be pragmatic.


I think that the electricity issue in hardfacing or fabricating anvils is a myth. I fabricated one anvil, and added up the cost of electricity. It was neglibible (about one or two dollars, if I recall). I have a hard reference for this number if anyone is interested. It comes out of an old manufacturing technology book when labor was $12 per hour and electricity was 6 cents per kilowatt hour. I can provide it if there is interest.

You probably guessed it. Labor is the main cost, especially if you use cheap (expired or wet?) rod. It is difficult to measure how much people value their time, but the best estimates I have seen are based on bridge toll avoidance. As for me, I would rather weld than drive.;)
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