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Leg vise bushing


Red Hot 77

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That is not an original leg vise bushing. I have forged new washers and I have also turned them on a lathe. I have heard these called oval washers because they have a curved inner surface to match the curve on the shoulder on the vise screw. This is important because it allows the the screw to tighten with even pressure on the on the outer jaw of the leg vise. Prevents scoring in the screw shoulder and the hole on the front jaw.

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That brass thing looks like some kind of plumbing part, maybe to attach to a fire hydrant or similar. I would recommend using a throwout bearing of of a manual shift auto/truck maybe a tranny shop has a pile of old ones in scrap bin to choose from, used one should work great. My peter wright vices have flats where the screw meets the movable jaw and my columbian vices have the ball socket on the screw to keep even pressure, I can post pics if anyone needs to see.
Rob

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Here are some pics, The one taken apart has a semi truck wheel bearing instead of a throwout bearing. It is a 2" dia thread on the screw. You should be able to see the cupped washer that is on the back side. The other one with the cupped washers (front and back) are the original ones and should be simple to make. I believe these vices are both columbian, 160# and 90#, about 8" and 6". The two with flat washers are peter wright, the small one, about 4" with one washer looks to be the original one, it has two small grooves around it that match the rest of the grooves elsewhere on it, the larger one, about 6" with two flat washers looks like someone tried to make it easier to open/close by adding another surface that could be lubricated. The screw box on these two is in direct contact with the stationary jaw, it is a flat surface. Both of the peter wrights have bent frames and I think it is partly to do with not having a ball joint on them. As soon as you start to open the jaws the flat contact turns into a point load and without the ball socket to spread that load it is easier to bend the jaws. I know that any vice can be bent by overloading. Are columbians made in USA and peter wright in England? :D
Rob

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