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I Forge Iron

SlimW

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    New Castle, PA
  • Interests
    Knives, forging, turning scrap into smaller scrap

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  1. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    I am certainly going to make a broach for the handle. Filing took far too long. I have some sawsall blades laying around that should work. Thanks for the pic!
  2. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    I definitely wore a respirator, I've read enough about how bad that dust is for your lungs. It helps cut down on the smell somewhat, also. There will be no gap between the ricasso and the antler, I am making a guard that will fit in that gap. I was going to use that hunk of brass, but it's too thick for this design, and I don't want to waste the material, so I will use some mild steel, I think. After I cut the antler with my bandsaw, and ground it into basic shape with my belt sander, I cut the hole for the tang by starting with a drill, then hand-filing with a square file. It took a long time and didn't smell much better Wish I'd had a broach.
  3. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    the antler is fitted to tang. Having never used antler before, I was not prepared for just how much stink cutting antler makes.
  4. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    the very first thing I've ever put a makers mark on:
  5. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    knife handle. (some assembly required. warranty not included) The pieces are: deer antler, a chunk of coppery brass I found somewhere, a sheet of brass, a chunk of walnut, and a 3/8-24 screw cap.
  6. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    the blade survived heat treat. it did warp, though, so I used my precision warp remover while the blade was hot: this worked pretty well. I had to heat the blade twice, the first try didn't harden. I suspect I didn't have it quite high enough or evenly hot prior to quenching. thats what I get for using an acetylene torch.
  7. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    one side all shaped to 120. new files are wonderful.
  8. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    why yes, how did you know I stack all my files in a pile in an old toolbox? it does indeed look like I have a lot of future knife stock.
  9. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    I just picked up a couple of fine-toothed files, flat and chainsaw, to finish the first bevel. What an astounding difference a new, quality file makes! I've been using files from buckets of files I picked up at yard sales, and Harbor Freight specials. There is simply no comparison. I've been working much harder than I needed to.
  10. SlimW

    Spoiler alert

    I filed in the sharpening choil first, then used a round file to cut the plunge. I then drew a line down the middle of the plunge and am using that to line up my file stop. Now comes lots of filing. I didn't consider that the round plunge lined up at an angle, so my ricasso will be angled, but I guess it will be ok.
  11. Knife #6. I have read that you need to make 40 knives before you should start selling them, so I have a few more to go. I want this one to be good enough to put a maker mark on it, though. Same metal as #5, hidden tang, skinner. Stock removal (still don't have time to finish my forge). Filing the inside corners of the tang was somehow very satisfying, as I've never really done that before. There is a nick on the one side as the angle grinder got away from me, but that will be hidden by the handle, and I'll polish it down later.
  12. Well, I didn't end up making a sheath, but I did give to the guy I made it for, he was quite happy with it. It was a good trade, I got enough nice walnut out of the deal to make like 700 knives, and some good practice. On to the next project!
  13. now with wood finish. on to a sheath!
  14. you make it look easy. if only it actually was. I mean, the grinding alone...beautiful work.
  15. Thank you. I had sanded off the original quench oil finish, it wasn't too durable, and instead I tried cold blue. I used alcohol and acetone to clean the blade before I did it, but it still ended being a little blotchy. I carded it, reapplied, then polished the faces again to get the nice lines on the edges. The scales are walnut, pinned on with the brass rod, and glued with epoxy. I applied some Formby's Tung oil to the scales and I'm letting it dry before I resand with 1000 grit and reapply. The wood does look nicer now, I'll post an updated pic when I'm done.
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