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Found 341 results

  1. Hey guys, I am entirely new to this and wanting to build a for out of an air compressor. My original plan was to create a rectangular first, but I have this and thought it would be a good start. I have tried to research if this is a good idea or not, but I would like some input from people who have been doing this for a while. I will not build until the new year, so I have time. Dimensions are 24" long and 6" od. I was thinking 2- 3/4" burners with 1 or 2" fiber blanket. If it's a bad idea, I think it would be a decent quench tank. Thoughts?
  2. Hello IFI, I've been passing through this forum for quite some time and as I just fired my first home built forge I though it time to join. Here's the build out list: Brake Disc, 16x30 metal cart, Buffalo blower, 2 inch piping for tuyere, clay, fire brick, and regular brick. sheet metal. I clayed the entire cart around the disc under the bricks, this leveled things out for the brick mostly, but also added a nice added layer of thermal protection to the cheap cart metal. Fire brick is cut around the disc face, giving me a pot 3.5 inches deep and 7 inches wide. Picked up the blower for a steal on auction, ugly on the outside but beautiful on the inside, once I cleaned it out and re-lubed it turns like brand new. Currently I've got a 2x4 and metal straps holding it rigid with the piping but plan to swap that for some metal brackets in the future, it was just all I had laying around at the time. Lastly I added the simple metal surround for wind protection plus the added benefit of being able to pile extra fuel up that back wall in the corners. Fired for the first time Sunday with some nice lump charcoal, wally world was having a sale so why not... As it was over 100 degrees out I mostly just beat up some rebar I had laying around before shutting things down, test firing was a huge success. I noticed a few odd hot spots underneath the cart and decided to clay in the interior of the pot as well which I should have done it to begin with anyways, but that should take care of my errant heat. We'll see in a few days when I have time to light it up again. Outside of heating things up with a torch and beating them until they submit to my will around the homestead I've only ever worked steel on a lathe and that was a few (read 20) years ago. I've done some forging of specialty tools made out of soft metals like copper and bronze in the distant past as well but never what I would call blacksmithing of anything. I've been wanting to get into this side of things for quite awhile so I'm excited about this forge build and can't wait to see how ugly my first projects turn out. Ha ha. Attaching some pics for your pleasure or verbal destruction, whichever your bent.
  3. Hello all, I'm looking at buying my first forge this week after having taken my first class and absolutely loving it. I've been trying to look into the NC Knifemakers Forge over the Whisper Momma based on some complaints I've seen on the Whisper Momma not getting to forge welding temperature very easily. Does anyone have any experience with this forge? I can't find any previous threads talking about this one. If you have any thoughts let me know! (I'm looking to buy rather than build because I've been buying materials for a few weeks and loved my first forging session and would like to get started. I have no welding experience and I feel like it would take quite a while to build my own. Therefore I've just been trying to find what I can best get for my money that isn't going to be a gas hog or cheap firebrick forge like a diamondback.) Thanks!
  4. Hello I am kinda new, and one of the focuses I want to get into is tool making. I have seen lots of info on making pretty much any tool I can think of besides anvils, and was wondering if anyone had info on this topic. More specifically forged anvils, not tooled or cast. I have seen a few small projects mostly from alec Steele for decorative ones, but I want to learn to make useful ones starting small, and working up to larger ones.
  5. Hi all, New to the forums and to smithing. I see a lot of good info here, so I wanted to ask the question. To build or to buy? I've seen a lot of forges online priced $350 and up, that's a big pill for a newbie like me, so I was wondering if it'd be cheaper/smarter to build. I need everything for anvils to hammers and would like to be as economical as possible. So i did some googling, found this site, bummed around Amazon and eBay, and I noticed that buying the materials plus shipping as about the same if not more than buying a pre-made forge. Now, all I looked for was sheet metal, Fire brick (3k degree), KaoWool, and rigidizer. No itc-100, and I figure I can make some Sodium Silicate Glue. The big questions I have are: Can the Perlite-n-Playsand DIY bricks hold up to the heat as well as the Factory made? Is there a DIY KaoWool equivalent? Is the ITC necessary on the forge walls/Ceiling? I have a supply/warehouse within 15 miles of home so sheet metal and Stock shouldn't be an issue. I have drafted a forge design from some pics I have seen around, I also have several tanks around the house (Propane, air tanks, Grills) that I could chop up If my design isn't feasible, seeing as I built it around what I found on eBay for what looked like cheaper than average prices.The bricks I found are keyed so one would need cut in half to square the ends for the forge floor. The inner cavity of my design seems to come out to: 9.5"W x 3"H x 17"L Pics ahoy and thanks for the help in advance! Cut Key Brick Layout.bmp
  6. Hi everyone! Please, I know, before you bash me, this has been asked hundreds of times. The problem I have is that I have ABSOLUTELY no access to any of the 2000C° plus refractory linings. I live on a small island in Portugal, there are no blacksmith, no forges, so no forge related stores. And due to EU regulations, most refractories contain chemicals not really suitable for exportation/importation so any outside shops I find, don't ship them here. I managed to buy a decent amount of ceramic blanket, but I'll be getting my cancer through smoking, so I need to coat it. So I was thinking if I could basically make a thick steel box, stuff as much blanket as possible in there and make another square box thing to use as the inside walls of the forge. I wonder if the heat would cause so much warpage that the steel would just unweld itself, also thought about expanding gases inside the insulation so I would drill tiny hole just to vent the extra pressure so it wouldn't blow up on me. Any help, someone who could send me some castable refractory, is greatly appreciated. TL;DR : Can I use steel plates as my forge lining?
  7. I'm looking for some help identifying this forge I recently picked up. Instead of a hand crank, it uses a lever/pump action to move the blower. It's definitely been repaired on top at some point over the years as it looks like the pan probably rusted through. Everything else is in original shape and works great, although the legs are pretty wobbly at this point. Should I restore them and make it usable again or leave it as-is and sell it to someone who needs a decoration? The hand crank mechanism works, ie. it blows a bit of air, but it's a lot more work than turning a hand powered version, even one without a flywheel. Just seems very over complicated and inefficient, which is why I'm wondering if it's not somehow "special." I can't find any identifying marks anywhere except for a 526 and 527 on either side of the tuyere. I hadn't ever seen anything like it and figured it had to be worth something!
  8. Hello! I have a question about a 4-way directional control valve. I have build a forge press for my smithy, and I’m wondering if there is a power stroke port on my control valve. The system is a 25 ton press, but I don’t feel like I am getting the power that the system is designed for. I’ll attach some pictures. I’m wondering if I have my hoses from the control valve and DA cylinder connected correctly. I installed everything to the manufacturers specifications. Also, regarding the control valve, I have to lift up on the handle to articulate the cylinder downward, and push down on the handle to articulate the ram upward. Can I reverse the hose positions on the control valve ports to reverse the direction without sacrificing tonnage force? Is the force equal on both ports? I think I remember reading something on the cylinder spec that the return stroke is much less powerful than the pressing stroke. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Than you!! -Joshua Frost
  9. Currently working on my new ribbon burner forge build. I put an initial layer of around 1/2 of Kastolite 30 on top of my kawool, after I let it dry to gently rubbed off the crumbly sections to see what was solid. I chose to add another layer since it seemed thin on the forge floor. Should I add another layer on the roof? It seems solid currently, and there's just a few small patches I have to fill in. I've heard that I could potentially cause issues with having two layers of Kastolite? Thanks!
  10. Hello there! New member here, me and my dad are in the middle of building a propane tank forge. So far it is all put together, cut open and ready for refractories. Here's our issue: He have some ceramic wool to line the inside, 1" thick. We know that it is better to do 2", and I think we have enough for 2". We Also have 2 5-gallon buckets of unknown refractory cement (We don't know what kind/brand it is, we just know that it is refractory cement). Our original plan was to line the forge with the wool, and then coat it with the refractory. But as I've been reading and looking around, I've heard about rigidizer and that wool insulates better, etc. So we are wondering what we should do. I think we are going to line it and try a thin layer of the cement on the bottom to test the cement and to see how well it adheres and such to the wool. We just need advice and tips, what we should do, etc... We haven't built one of theses before (Obviously) but we have built a brake drum open forge. The other thing we want to do is to use a blower and coal rather then propane because we have a TON of coal. We are making it so we can use coal or we will be able to switch out the fan for a propane burner. We are going to have a rounded bottom in the forge, rather then flat so that when we put coal in it the coal will make a flat bed to put the steel/knives/etc. on top of it. We have put the face of the forge on a hinge so we can open it and clean it out, shovel the coal out, etc. Thoughts on this? The last thing for right now is that we have seen people put a hole in the back of the forge, and we aren't sure if it is for anything other then just long pieces of bar stock, so insight on this would be great. And, literally anything you could tell me about blacksmithing! Any tips, tricks, advice, literally anything would be helpful. We have a shop with lots of tools and machines, and we have both done a bit of blacksmithing, but I want to really expand my blacksmithing knowledge and skill this year, Thanks!
  11. Does anyone have any information about this item or it’s value. I’m sorry for the horrible picture & the tiller the way. It was my grandpa’s. Located in Des Moines, Iowa. I appreciate your help-tyi!
  12. The following is a quick summery of the 55 Forge. More in depth design and discussion can be found on the site. The original 55 Forge was bottom blast. The fire shown is a little shallow, so if there is a question, just add more fuel. The tuyere was a piece of auto exhaust pipe with 1/4 inch holes to accept 1/4 inch round bar in a X pattern to form a grate. Lots of open room for air to move up and into the bottom of the fire. The next test modification was to put a brake drum into the 55 forge as a fire pot. You can see the cone shape to the ash and the rim of the fire pot. The bricks were added to give the fire more depth for the project at hand. Ash will build up to the top of the tuyere in the bottom blast in a fire or two. There is a T configuration below the bottom of the forge that is not shown. The T section is close to the bottom of the forge and the down pipe is 12 to 18 inches long (what ever you have on hand). Clinker is not really a problem due to the size of the tuyere. Just let the fire idle for a minute or two and the clinker will solid up and can be hooked out. Ash will at times fill the down pipe and need cleaned out. I have run this forge using coal dust or breeze. Once the fuel starts to coke ( a couple of minutes into the fire ) there is very little fuel that falls into the down pipe. The next modification was to make the 55 Forge a side blast forge. Just cut a slice in the side of the wall and add an air pipe. The depth of the slice was to the top of a house brick laid on its side. It was available. The fire shown is a little shallow, so if there is a question, just add more fuel. I like this design as it is so simple to build and works. That is an aluminum clothes dryer vent pipe being used to transfer air from the blower to the forge. With the side blast version the ash and any clinker builds up under the fire. On either 55 forge, the cut edges of the metal as they are sharp. You can roll them over, or cut a 2 inch piece of metal from the parent drum, fold it in half long ways, and place it over the cut edge of the metal pan. The 55 forge was developed so that any one in any third world country could have a forge with little or no cost. The forge runs on solid fuel, coal, coke, wood, charcoal, lumbar, pallets, etc. As has been stated many times before, Fuel does not make the fire hot, Air makes the fire hot. If there is a question about how hot, then add more fuel and more air. It can and has reached welding heat. It has also melted the metal if you do not pay attention to what your doing. ( Do not ask how I know this as I was not paying attention.) The 55 Forge is a great design that is simple and works. It is easily modified to adjust the size of the fire pot, the depth of the fire pot, different tuyere configurations, and the list goes on and on. Folks thought a brake drum was needed, so I tried both a brake drum and rotor. Each has advantages and disadvantages and in the end were not required. It simply adds a level of complexity to the system and overcomplicates simple. The fun part of the 55 Forge is make one, use it, modify it as you wish. When you finish there is another 55 Forge on the other end of the drum as a spare. The label on a drum is NOT accurate, it only means that is what the drum contained just before the label was applied. I found a empty drum at a auto repair shop. The label said 5W30 motor oil with a brand I immediately recognized. Somehow the top of the drum was hooved or domed a bit. When I removed the bung plug from the bung hole there was release of pressure and an overpowering aroma of gasoline and other very volatile materials. I ask the shop manager about the drum and he said "Oh that was the one they used for racing fuel last weekend." ALWAYS choose a drum that you can pronounce what it contained before you brought it home. NEVER use anything that throws off heat or sparks when you open a closed container or drum. If in doubt, have someone else cut the drum in half while you go get a burger and fries for the both of you for lunch. The 55 Forge is just a way to get you started quickly, so you can play in the fire while you research and plan on what your second forge design will look like.
  13. After a year using a JABOD forge (using charcoal), I decided to solidify make a steel fire pot. I was tired of having to reform the sides because they'd crumble. So, inspired by the fire pot that Charles R. Stevens showed us in a different topic, I made my own. I work mostly on small items (hooks, leaves, etc.), so I wanted a shape that would conserve fuel as much as possible. This is why I added a slope on the wall opposite the tuyere. A slightly more complex shape but the bottom is only 2" by 3", while the top is 5" by 10". Total height is 6". First I made a cardboard mockup to be sure my plan worked: Everything looked good, so I proceeded with steel. I used pieces from a wood stove I took apart last year. The plates are 3/16" thick. Should be thick enough to last me a good while, considering that I spend less than 10 hours a week. Overall, it took me about 3 hours to cut the pieces, fit and weld them together. I immediately moved it into place in my existing forge. I only had time for a quick test burn. Worked well, although the sides are higher than what I was using by about an inch. It still took less charcoal to fill than the JABOD. Even better, it was much faster and easier to clean up. I should be able to do more complete testing tomorrow and deteemine whether I need to shorten it a bit. Once that is determined, I may add a rim to finish it. Cheers! Arthur
  14. I have acquired i believe, an old large forge bellow. It's large, probably 6 feet tall. I attached pictures. It was in a church,so I was assuming it was some kind of old organ,but after researching, I found forge bellows and I think that's what it is. Im not sure why the church had it,lol. I'm wondering if anyone can point me in the direction to the makers of these. I'd like to find out the history; company name, year made, etc. I would like find out if it is worth anything and if so, who I would contact? I'm so so clueless about where to go with this lol.
  15. Hey guys I just wanted to show y'all my newest forge I just built and tested. It works pretty good but still needs a few things before it's finished. I built it from a piece of tube iron I cut one side off of and I'm gonna put 2 slits in that side so I can slide it down on one end to keep the fuel source in and will make it adjustable for smaller projects. I may add a spot on top of one of the sides to hold the charcoal before it goes into the fire. I still gotta add legs too and I am gonna add a bleeder valve to make the air flow adjustable with a hole in the side of the tuyere that I can put a slide pipe on to make it more adjustable for my hair dryer. But this really worked well when I tested it. Let me know what you guys think.
  16. This is video #2 in the Blacksmith Twist or Basket handle series..
  17. Hi. I built a gas forge from a paint can. A lot of shortcuts were taken to save time and money. Many things were not done quite right according to helpful posts in this subgroup. The forge was lined with a homemade refractory composed of fireclay, grog, perlite, wood ash, and concrete. When it was first built, it could barely weld mild steel. Since it was outside, it eventually rusted through and the refractory collapsed. Even after repairs, it wouldn't weld. Some colleagues wanted to use it, so it looked like time for a new one.
  18. I'm a young kid (15) looking to get into blacksmithing. The issue is that I lack the instruction to do so, as well as a forge. I'm wondering if there is anyone in South West Washington or the greater Pacific Northwest that would be willing to help me out. I have most of the materials to fabricate a forge using a 20 lb propane bottle following Wayne Coe's instructions (excluding the burner (requires welding) and burner parts), however, I'm severely limited by my tools, lacking both a welder, and a plasma cutter as well as a shop of any sort. If there is any way in which someone would be willing to lend me a hand and help me fabricate a forge (I will of course pay for materials costs as well as time) that would be greatly appreciated. General advice or apprenticing of any shape is of course more than welcome. I'm happy to pay in cash or barter (my families owns a creamery) for any services that could be provided, whichever is preferable. My apologies if this is in the wrong directory I'm still very new to the forum. Thanks, -Will
  19. Hey everyone! I built my first forge ever yesterday out of some bricks in an old grill. I’m using a black iron pipe and a hair dryer with a shop vac attachment as my air source. Charcoal is the fuel. Mid anyone has any suggestions or recommendations please let me know what I need to do to forge properly and safely. Thanks Dallas
  20. I'm in the process of building my first venturi forge. It'll be a simple forge based off of Michael Porter's book. The main question I have is one I can't seem to find an answer to. I read LP rated teflon tape is a no-no for pressurized gas lines. So properly rated dope paste is what I hear some people use. My question about that is do you use pipe dope on your lines? If so, do you use pipe dope on your high pressure regulator, the line coming from it, the pressure gauge on the regulator, the quick shut off valve, and the backside of your burner where the line connects? I assume the last gets a little too warm for dope to work correctly, but I want to know what you guys do anyway. My concern is dope getting the regulator, gauge, and possibly the burner all fouled up. My other concern is having a gas leak and potentially losing my shop and/or some parts that I was born with. I know that it's a touchy subject, so I'll state for the record that I take full responsibility for everything that goes right or wrong in my shop and on my property. I'm only asking what you folks do for your venturi forges. I am not asking for you to tell me what to do. If you know of a resource I can use to get that information, I would greatly appreciate that as well. Thanks, Patrick
  21. So, I bought a forge. It's lined with ceramic wool and no refractory (I believe) is that okay?
  22. I have a champion 145-18 forge (the round little guy) and the fan inside of the blower has a "blade" broken off. I have the broken piece but don't see a way to repair it. Does anyone know where i can get a replacement or something else that will do the job?
  23. Hi all! I quickly progressed from coal to gas in a matter of trying coal once. we dont agree. Anyrate. Disclaimer: I am 99% self taught so..I followed the plans laid out by a youtuber i made a gas forge and burners out of an old propane tank and some pipe. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiSgR-IJMyk) I am quite proud of myself i learned how to stick weld also. After a couple of small projects (simple tons, knife and Kukhri) im getting more comfortable really cranking the heat. I have since then got a fire brick to go inside and i stack on the backside of the forge. I am running a 30 psi regulator. Being said when i light the forge i steadly increase the gas, when i hear popping i increase it more. At one point just recently i was unable to increase my gas flow and i kept hearing the popping. A couple questions: What do i need to do to stop this? get a higher regulator? I assume my forge was too hot? I also assume if i continue to let the popping happen that is bad? Thanks in advance.
  24. Greetings! I wanted to see if the experts on this forum might catch any red flags that may be causing combustion issues with my forge. I shot a quick video demonstrating the issue. The problem starts 3 mins, 10 secs in: I built this based mostly on the David Hammer Super C Forge and burner design (minus the side access slot). It has been running stable for months, but now after running for around 30 mins, the point of combustion shifts from the interior of the forge, to the end of the flair (about 1 inch inside the refractory). I get less time if I run it hotter. The burner port leaves about 1/4 inch of space around burner flair. Before shooting the video, I has run for a little over 30 mins. I let it cool for about 15 mins to capture the transition. Don't know if I need to tune the burner, if there are issues with my refractory, or something else that I might not have considered. I've been doing this for around 6-7 months so my knowlege is pretty limited. Any thoughts on where I might be going wrong here? Thank you for any input you might have.
  25. Anyone know how I could make a Cinder-block coal forge?