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Found 331 results

  1. This is video #2 in the Blacksmith Twist or Basket handle series..
  2. evfreek

    Replacing the old paint can

    Hi. I built a gas forge from a paint can. A lot of shortcuts were taken to save time and money. Many things were not done quite right according to helpful posts in this subgroup. The forge was lined with a homemade refractory composed of fireclay, grog, perlite, wood ash, and concrete. When it was first built, it could barely weld mild steel. Since it was outside, it eventually rusted through and the refractory collapsed. Even after repairs, it wouldn't weld. Some colleagues wanted to use it, so it looked like time for a new one.
  3. I'm a young kid (15) looking to get into blacksmithing. The issue is that I lack the instruction to do so, as well as a forge. I'm wondering if there is anyone in South West Washington or the greater Pacific Northwest that would be willing to help me out. I have most of the materials to fabricate a forge using a 20 lb propane bottle following Wayne Coe's instructions (excluding the burner (requires welding) and burner parts), however, I'm severely limited by my tools, lacking both a welder, and a plasma cutter as well as a shop of any sort. If there is any way in which someone would be willing to lend me a hand and help me fabricate a forge (I will of course pay for materials costs as well as time) that would be greatly appreciated. General advice or apprenticing of any shape is of course more than welcome. I'm happy to pay in cash or barter (my families owns a creamery) for any services that could be provided, whichever is preferable. My apologies if this is in the wrong directory I'm still very new to the forum. Thanks, -Will
  4. Hey everyone! I built my first forge ever yesterday out of some bricks in an old grill. I’m using a black iron pipe and a hair dryer with a shop vac attachment as my air source. Charcoal is the fuel. Mid anyone has any suggestions or recommendations please let me know what I need to do to forge properly and safely. Thanks Dallas
  5. LineSix

    Gas, dope, leaks, and questions

    I'm in the process of building my first venturi forge. It'll be a simple forge based off of Michael Porter's book. The main question I have is one I can't seem to find an answer to. I read LP rated teflon tape is a no-no for pressurized gas lines. So properly rated dope paste is what I hear some people use. My question about that is do you use pipe dope on your lines? If so, do you use pipe dope on your high pressure regulator, the line coming from it, the pressure gauge on the regulator, the quick shut off valve, and the backside of your burner where the line connects? I assume the last gets a little too warm for dope to work correctly, but I want to know what you guys do anyway. My concern is dope getting the regulator, gauge, and possibly the burner all fouled up. My other concern is having a gas leak and potentially losing my shop and/or some parts that I was born with. I know that it's a touchy subject, so I'll state for the record that I take full responsibility for everything that goes right or wrong in my shop and on my property. I'm only asking what you folks do for your venturi forges. I am not asking for you to tell me what to do. If you know of a resource I can use to get that information, I would greatly appreciate that as well. Thanks, Patrick
  6. Mr. Dobson

    Help needed!

    So, I bought a forge. It's lined with ceramic wool and no refractory (I believe) is that okay?
  7. I have a champion 145-18 forge (the round little guy) and the fan inside of the blower has a "blade" broken off. I have the broken piece but don't see a way to repair it. Does anyone know where i can get a replacement or something else that will do the job?
  8. OriginalPancake

    Popping in the forge? gas related

    Hi all! I quickly progressed from coal to gas in a matter of trying coal once. we dont agree. Anyrate. Disclaimer: I am 99% self taught so..I followed the plans laid out by a youtuber i made a gas forge and burners out of an old propane tank and some pipe. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiSgR-IJMyk) I am quite proud of myself i learned how to stick weld also. After a couple of small projects (simple tons, knife and Kukhri) im getting more comfortable really cranking the heat. I have since then got a fire brick to go inside and i stack on the backside of the forge. I am running a 30 psi regulator. Being said when i light the forge i steadly increase the gas, when i hear popping i increase it more. At one point just recently i was unable to increase my gas flow and i kept hearing the popping. A couple questions: What do i need to do to stop this? get a higher regulator? I assume my forge was too hot? I also assume if i continue to let the popping happen that is bad? Thanks in advance.
  9. Pete Resseguie-Snyder

    Forge burner troubleshooting

    Greetings! I wanted to see if the experts on this forum might catch any red flags that may be causing combustion issues with my forge. I shot a quick video demonstrating the issue. The problem starts 3 mins, 10 secs in: I built this based mostly on the David Hammer Super C Forge and burner design (minus the side access slot). It has been running stable for months, but now after running for around 30 mins, the point of combustion shifts from the interior of the forge, to the end of the flair (about 1 inch inside the refractory). I get less time if I run it hotter. The burner port leaves about 1/4 inch of space around burner flair. Before shooting the video, I has run for a little over 30 mins. I let it cool for about 15 mins to capture the transition. Don't know if I need to tune the burner, if there are issues with my refractory, or something else that I might not have considered. I've been doing this for around 6-7 months so my knowlege is pretty limited. Any thoughts on where I might be going wrong here? Thank you for any input you might have.
  10. NateHMirage

    Mock ITC 100

    In the search for itc 100 replacements(price) I had learned the original formula was near 70 percent zircopax and 30 percent kaolin. When shopping i came across a high zirconia kiln wash from "The Ceramic Shop" and went to thinking. It has already been tested and formulated and its cheaper per pound.... So i bought a box and some zircopax and kaolin. My recipe was one cup wash, a third cup zircopax and one sixth cup kaolin. The mixture dried rock hard and seems to be very durable.
  11. Mr. Dobson

    Cinder-block Coal forge?

    Anyone know how I could make a Cinder-block coal forge?
  12. blacksmith03

    Maxon Premix Burner

    Does anyone know anything about Maxon Premix Burners? Someone gave me this and they said it's a gas forge. I have no use for it so I'm planning to sell. Any idea how much it's worth? It does get power it's just too rusty to work. Thanks!
  13. lsknives

    zircon

    anybody used zircon in your forge
  14. A forge I plan on building when I get home. I can make tweaks and modifications as needed. This is just a rough concept. The air supply is going to be a 442 CFM centrifuge fan with a charcoal filter(that's whats on the back of the fan itself) and it has a speed selector switch so it's adjustable. It will go from ducting into a pipe that will hopefully be able to be placed at the bottom to supply the forge with the airflow it needs. If I do run the piping down the center like that, holes will be drilled to allow the airflow to go through but I'm not sure how that would effect how it's displaced through the forge itself, or how long the length of the pipe leading to it would effect it as well. I.e. whether or not it would be getting sufficient air supply. The inside is lined with firebrick(the brown-yellow inside), I'm just not sure what to build the outside or base from for it to be the best or what would be the best for it. Any suggestions?
  15. Josh Hoffman

    Champion 400 and Rivet forge

    Thinking about picking this guy up. The fella selling wants $300 OBO. He days the blower works like a dream. How's this all sound to you guys?
  16. Today was the fated first day of my blacksmithing apprenticeship at the Daniel Boone Homestead! And I would just like to take a moment...to yell from the rooftops about how much fun it was!! I expected to work my butt off today and I was not disappointed! My master/teacher (honestly not sure about the propper terms these days) said that for the first day of me tending a forge or hammering anything on an anvil I did a really good job. (And according to one of our other smiths at the Homestead, if he says you're doing good you're really doing good!) As for burns, nicks, and other injuries, thankfully just a few extremely minor burns and a bit of soot in my nose afterwards. If I counted correctly I burned myself at least 6 times. Once was when a piece of scale flew off my piece and landed right on my hand! Thankfully, I didn't drop what I was holding in my tongs. And the other one that left a mark was when I got my hand too close to the hood over the fire and sizzled myself a bit. Today I learned how to make simple wall hooks with a small scroll and a twist. I managed to get two of them done over the course of 6 hours, which I'm really proud of. Our forge is charcoal, 18th century style, and has an old historic and busted double chambered bellow. (There's literally duct tape all over it they need to really get it replaced and put the original in a museum.) So it took a bit longer/more work to get the fire going as much as I needed it too. Here come the pictures! Here's what our forge looks like! I really love the bricked forge so when I finally can build something like this it's going to happen. Our working anvil, in the 18th century they wouldn't have had an anvil in this style, but it works for what we need. Getting the fire going, alas it's commercial charcoal so it pops and sparks a lot but hey it works so I can't complain too much. I just don't appreciate the fact that my fire is trying to be the 4th of July in the end of September. And the two hooks I made today! First one on the left, second on the right. The second one is shorter because the scroll broke twice... Ugh. Thankfully Frank (my teacher) was able to help me fix it. Techniques in the project for anyone curious are: Temperature gaging/fire managing, Drawing out a taper, gently creating a scroll, dulling down sharp edges, creating a hook on the bick, 1/4" half faced blow, drawing out shoulders, upsetting, punching a hole, and finally twisting. (and obviously removing scale) These bad boys were finally warmed and sprayed with cooking spray to help keep them rust free and make them look a little nicer. I'm extremely happy with how these turned out, and my significant other has already stolen one... Guess I'll have to make more! EDIT: I forgot to mention that I did all of the work with only a hammer. Frank helped me correct a few things with needlenose pliars where necessary but besides that, it was hammer and eventually, twisting wrench.
  17. Hello all. First post here. Just bought this forge yesterday and would love to give it a try. Bought it without legs and blower. What is this folding hood like item? Did that come with it originally? Also what is the bracket on the middle of the lid for? These are some reference pics I found of the unit in use and of the blower I need to fit. Any idea on what to call this blower? Through my searching it seems this ones reference number is elusive. Any tips for setup? Just throw some dirt in there to keep the fuel in the middle?
  18. Howdy folks, been looking for an anvil and I MIGHT have hit the jackpot. This guy says he has a Lewis anvil (doesn't sound like he know's exactly what he's got), and he's selling it for $1 per lb. I need some better pictures, but from the ones below, can y'all tell if it's too pitted/chipped on the top to be worth the buy? thanks
  19. AggieBlacksmith

    Blower electrical help!

    Howdy smiths, So here's the short of it: I have a Fasco B24220 AC blower and I want to wire it to a foot pedal which will plug into a standard outlet. My trouble is, I'm electrically challenged. Any advice on electrical specs/wire/foot pedal I can buy to accomplish this? Here's the info on the wires connected to the blower (which which happens to be a NON POLARIZED AC MOTOR?): CSA CL1251 OR AWM I A/B 1258C 600V Ft-2 E29326 AWM 125*C 600 V Style F 3173 18 AWG Suitable for Switchboard Wire. Thanks and Gig'em! Micah
  20. The Old Dairy Forge

    Tuyere Grate

    Hi, I'm in need of a new 6" Tuyere Grate, did some searching but can only find ones in America, has anyone any links to UK sites that sells them or know of anyone who makes/sells them? Thanks
  21. machinisttalk

    First Gas Forge (UFO build)

    Hello all, Wanted to share my first build with you guys so I can hopefully get it done in a good way the first time. I am still working on getting supplies together. I don't have a bunch of fab equipment, so I am trying to re-purpose this old stainless sink. I am looking to create a really basic forge so I can get to heating steel relatively quickly, both in the sense of a easy build, but also a build that is well insulated. One thing I am still thinking out is the angle of the burner. I know a 10/15 degree offset is recommended. I am going to try the Zoeller sidearm burner, which I know is rated for ~350cu/in, so I will work on get the insulation sized correctly. Any tips or critiques, please send them. Thanks, Mic
  22. Davishomesteadandforge

    Early 1900s or earlier forge

    The man who owned this forge died in the 1980s he used it before electrucity came to oklahoma in 1937 he inherited it from his father it was the main forge in the dibble/Blanchard Washington region for a long time how long I'm not sure. Any ideas of the origin before that or how to restore it?
  23. jdawgnc

    Antique coal forge

    I'm looking for some help identifying this forge I recently picked up. Instead of a hand crank, it uses a lever/pump action to move the blower. It's definitely been repaired on top at some point over the years as it looks like the pan probably rusted through. Everything else is in original shape and works great, although the legs are pretty wobbly at this point. Should I restore them and make it usable again or leave it as-is and sell it to someone who needs a decoration? The hand crank mechanism works, ie. it blows a bit of air, but it's a lot more work than turning a hand powered version, even one without a flywheel. Just seems very over complicated and inefficient, which is why I'm wondering if it's not somehow "special." I can't find any identifying marks anywhere except for a 526 and 527 on either side of the tuyere. I hadn't ever seen anything like it and figured it had to be worth something!
  24. Well I recently finished up my third forge and thought I'd share the build with you all as I think it turned out pretty well. Sorry about all the pics, but everybody like pics right!?!? Back in about 2007, I built a real nice propane gas forge for my very first forge, and while it worked well, I quickly realized that I needed something that could handle a wider piece. So about a year later, I ended up making a simple coal forge from a wheelbarrow tub and a clothes dryer blower. I figured I'd make something simple, quick and cheap... then when I get more experience and could figure out exactly what I wanted in a forge, I could build one specifically to suit my needs. Well I finally went and did it, and I took pictures too! ... Lots and lots of pictures... To reminisce... here is a picture of my first gas forge, and also my simple wheelbarrow forge. Now, let's get on with the build! I've always considered the the firepot to be the heart of the forge, so that's what I started with. I have a CNC plasma cutting table so I drew up the firepot in Corel Draw, then cut out the pieces from 1/4" A36 HR steel and welded it up. Then I drew up an easy to replace "grate plate" for the bottom of the firpot. I was going to just weld in some bars for the grate, but thought I could easily cut a new one when it gets burnt out, and just drop it in place like this. The extra thickness will help the firpot last longer as well. Next I drew up the floor pan and cut it out from 3/16" steel, then drew up the four sides, cut them out, and welded them to the floor pan. Then I welded on some legs from 2X2 square tubing, welded some feet on them, and added some wheels on the back legs. The finished floor pan height is 32". I tore apart my wheelbarrow forge and used the blower, tuyere, and ash dump from it since it would save time, and it already worked great. I do wish the ash dump was deeper, but I can live with emptying it more often. I also welded on some bracing straps to mount the blower directly to the tuyere. I was going to drill and tap some holes in the bottom of the firepot, but I couldn't find my tap and die set, so I figured out which position I wanted the tuyere, drilled some matching holes in the firepot and the flange, then cut the heads off some 3/8" bolts and welded them in place to use as studs instead. I used blue tape to hold the studs upward in place while I plug welded them from the bottom inside of the firepot. Worked great! Here you can see a close up of them bolted together, a complete shot of my firepot/tuyere/blower/ash dump assembly, and finally with it installed under the forge body. I drew and cut out a piece of 14 guage steel for an air gate, then welded a handle and a stop to it. CNC plasma tables sure are handy! I decided to weld on some bars to hold my tongs, shovel, rake, etc... from 3/8" X 1" bar stock. I put them on three sides since I wanted the versability to be able to use it in lots of orientations. I have these openings on all four sides so I can get longer stock, low into the sweet spot if I need to, but I still wanted to be able to close the openings if I'm not using them so coal won't spill out. (also... the opening on the one end farthest from the firepot is deeper and flush with the floor pan in case I ever want to clean out the forge by sweeping rather than tipping it over) So to close them, I made some sliding "coal gates" that can be partially or fully slid out of the way, or even flipped to the outside when I want to open them. All four of the coal gates are identical for ease of replacement. Then I welded in some cord hangers to hold the 20' power cable. I couldn't decide on where to mount the power switch since I wasn't sure which of the 3 sides I would be using as the front, so I decided to attach the switch to a movable mount that can attach to anywhere on the forge body. I also used flexible steel conduit to help protect the wires from heat. And here it is all finished up! I painted the firepot and floor pan hi temp black, but painted everything else industrial grey since that's what I paint all my home built tools in. I also made a removable support extension for long stock that can mount anywhere on the forge body, and also stores conveniently on any side when I'm not using it. It's exactly 24" long and 12" wide to double as a measuring tool if needed, plus I bolted on a piece of broken measuring tape to it, for smaller measurements. Can't wait to fire it up!
  25. hikerjohnson

    JAPOB - Just A Pile Of Bricks

    Riffing on the JABOD idea, I decided to use what was handy, namely a pile of scrap 2x and plywood, some old bricks leftover from a neighbor's tumbledown chimney, the wifes long-forgotten hairdryer, and a bit of old fencepost pipe (relax, I am aware of hot zinc issues, and wore a respirator for the welding and first fire, thanks for thinking of me!). The bricks are piled up two-deep on the floor, and arranged so that the gaps between bricks dont line up. Nothing is mortared, so as the bricks burn up, which it will, I can just re-stack it all. The hardware store in town sells smithing coal, and so after a bit of faffing about getting the coal to coke and the bricks warmed up, it works quite nicely! I lost 6" of the rebar shortly after I took these photos, got distracted in the garage and left it in too long, and it melted right off! I just left the dryer on low, and the tuyere pipe swings in front of the dryer to adjust the blast; the pipe stays surprisingly cool in use, and when I was done, I just took it out so it wouldnt burn up in the after-fire heat. I set the dryer off at an angle, so if the blast control line gets knocked off, the fire will die down instead of run away on full blast. It's not perfect, but its not too bad for the investment. This was just a first fire and a test; I'm working on getting my anvil on a stand and so hopefully in the near future I'll actually get to do some work and get to know the forge. Hopefully I can make this little pile of bricks work for awhile.