gkhan

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About gkhan

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Houston Texas (Dislocated Iowan)
  • Interests
    Hobby metalworking including blacksmithing, welding, and casting.

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  1. Thanks for the response and information from the Sears Roebuck catalog. I intend to get back wtih her in a week or so about the anvil. I will show her what I have learned here. If she is receptive, I may make an offer for the anvil even though I do not need it.
  2. I have done the "don't try this at home" several times (carefully). Attached is a picture of what happens when you pour about 2 pounds of molten aluminum into about 20 gallons of water (slag tub). The net result is a loss of about five gallons of water. I have made a bunch of these with left over melts when I am done pouring. My favorite aluminum source is used gas grills. They recast real well.
  3. This is a clip from the picture on the side. The best I can tell is it says ACME with RJK(?) above it. It looked like someone has stamped it or something. There is also some symbol below it. I only had a few minutes to look at the thing and snap a couple of pictures. I also noticed the plate on the heel that looks like it is de-laminating. It didn't look like the gap was more than a fingernail deep. Also, looking throught the hardie and pritchel, you could not see a defining layer or separation. I didn't hit it with a hammer. I told the lady that I really wished it had not been welded to the plate.
  4. I had thought I read somewhere that Trenton actually made anvils for Sears (as did HB) and that those that were Trenton (Acme) products were stamped with a serial number on the foot whereas the HBs had no serial numbers.
  5. I have run into a widow lady who lives near me (Houston, TX) that has the attached anvil. It is an Acme (Trenton version?) that weighs 156 pounds per the stamp on the foot under the horn. The serial number next to it is 133322 as best that I can tell. I looked it over and it looks to be in pretty good shape. It has been sitting outside for years. The anvil is welded to the plate (3/8” think circle on some flame cut legs). The welds look like they would be easy to grind away to release the anvil. I told her I would ask around to see if anyone is interested. If it would have been 100 or 300 pounds, I might have considered it for myself but I have a nice 185 pound PW that I really like. The white paper is a 8.5 x 11 sheet for size reference. What would be a reasonable value? What would be the estimated age?
  6. I worked on a couple of solid fuel forges when I first started out but relocated several times and found propane was better for the hood (fewer complaints from the neighbors). Now I am located somewhere where solid fuel is a little more acceptable. I had been looking for a solid fuel forge for a while when a family member found this. They bought it for me sight unseen for $175. It needed a couple of nuts and bolts. The leather was still pretty good. I think it is early 1900s vintage but haven't pinned that down for sure. If anyone has some details on this particular model, I would appreciate a response. I won't use it all of the time but solid fuel does have someadvantages over propane. The 'motor' works cheap if I let him hammer.