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I Forge Iron

BsnNFrnt

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About BsnNFrnt

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Location
    Permian Basin, Southwestern United States.
  • Interests
    Lift Weights at 5 AM - forge at 5 PM if not that, with the wife and kids. Not much else.

Recent Profile Visitors

250 profile views
  1. All the hooks and deftly bent hardware inspired me to make some scrolling jigs. One is a multiple round with 4 diameter1&3/4” to 3&3/4”) base and 8 different diameter scroll. The other is 5&1/2” base and around 20 different scroll. Thanks to the members that have the interchangeable idea.
  2. Unless you are making a machete, a half gallon of Canola oil pre-heated to around 130 degrees Fahrenheit will work. Almost any cracker box sized, sheet metal container will perform admirably. I myself used an a spent welding rod box and a estate sale hot plate for years until my projects out grew it. A little searching and $10 bill will get you there.
  3. I learned to weld fairly late and as a result encountered some of the same issues. The best help I did myself was standing over the shoulder of an experienced welder. I watched him, then he in kind watched my technique. In less than an hour my welding improved more than it had in the prior 3 weeks. For the price of a few steaks and beers I improved my welding ten fold.
  4. I believe that was around 53’. In my defense, I was a track guy until I had to get a real job. Highland games was a natural extension and much like the smithing community is replete with like minded individuals.
  5. Training sporadically to make my masters highland game debut.
  6. In the past I have visited cabinet shops, particularly those that specialize in butcher block style counter tops. They receive rough cut lumber and plane it to the sizes they need - as a result they have multiple random sized cull pieces. If memory serves there are traditional ship builders in the Netherlands that may have access to different species and sizes of hardwoods. I believe there was a historical recreation ship project in Harlingen with piles of timber strewn about the grounds.
  7. My stand plus the anvil weight is close to 1700# and has performed great. The immobility of the unit helps with bending, upsetting and heavy striking. I can “cold bend” 5/8” sucker rod in the pritchel hole. That being said, the stand took three solid days to build and it was well worth it IMO. If you are getting a stand together I would aim for “immobility” under and usage and then move on from there
  8. Much like Chelonian and a few others stated, a large piece of steel that is harder than hot steel will work just fine in the interim. Practice your craft and your anvil needs will become more clear - followed by the patience to find the right equipment. I made this one out of a 5&1/2” pump plunger and some careful welding.
  9. No dancing just 9 years worth of tool hoarding.
  10. Three hours of grinding after forging about an hour. My attempt at a tapered lamb splitter to make the next hunting trip go smoother.
  11. If you have the capability/equipment to weld a horn to that block it would seem to me that you also have a chance to build rig for horn work. A double horn stake anvil arrangement out of the 4” round stock could look awesome, and not chance the heat treat on your big rectangle. My thoughts no knowing your set up.
  12. Red oak handle for a “boy’s axe”. 2x6 cut down and shaped by draw knife then sander. B.L.O. Applied with 5 day dry then one coat of light stain followed by two coats of shellac.
  13. There are lots of folks with similar interests in the DFW area. Finding a kind soul to help you weld those plates up might be easier than you think. My thoughts.
  14. MacLeod the sucker rod hammers should not be hard for a guy that makes dragons that look that good. I just had to build three drifts until I got one that worked.
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