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US Army portable forge made by Naudin Mfg Co 1946


hikeordie

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Just purchased a portable forge made for the Army by the Naudin Mfg Co.,in 1946. It is rectangular in shape with removable lid and legs.  Looks like the Lid had metal bars to attach it to the end of the forge body as a windbreak.   When I putchased the forge it was lined with fire brick and had a Wards Lakeside Quality Steel Forge 84-6510 blower with it.  And oh yes, one major item of interest, the forge is made entirely of aluminiun except for the ash grate and blower tube which are cast iron.  Has "US" , "Naudin MFG CO", and "1946" stamped into the side of the forge body and much of the orginal olive drab army paint.  Does anyone have any information on this item or the Wards blower that was attached.

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Posting a photo would help, but I'm just guessing it might be the forge that was part of the kit in the M3 and M12 welding trucks. There are a few photos in the War Department Technical Manual, TM 9-2852, Instruction Guide, Welding, Theory and Application, 3 June 1943 that show a rectangular portable forge. One of the photos (Figure 158a) shows the forge in its open and closed configurations, and the other illustrations (Figures 155b and 156b) show what appears to be the forge inside a truck. There might be a glimpse of the forge in Figure 156a as well.

By the way, there is also a chapter on forging and forge welding in this manual, but the above photos are in a subsequent chapter.

Just search online for "TM 9-2852" and you will probably get a bunch of hits. 

Steamboat

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10 hours ago, Steamboat said:

Posting a photo would help, but I'm just guessing it might be the forge that was part of the kit in the M3 and M12 welding trucks. There are a few photos in the War Department Technical Manual, TM 9-2852, Instruction Guide, Welding, Theory and Application, 3 June 1943 that show a rectangular portable forge. One of the photos (Figure 158a) shows the forge in its open and closed configurations, and the other illustrations (Figures 155b and 156b) show what appears to be the forge inside a truck. There might be a glimpse of the forge in Figure 156a as well.

By the way, there is also a chapter on forging and forge welding in this manual, but the above photos are in a subsequent chapter.

Just search online for "TM 9-2852" and you will probably get a bunch of hits. 

Steamboat

There's a digitized version HERE.

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Thanks for the information.  I will try to post a photo soon and will also check out the army field manual and post results of my search.  I also acquired a 120 lb Fulton cast steel anvil in near pristine condition which were made by the Columbia Hardware Co. for Sears in the early 1920's.  Great find.  I also saw a Peter Wright anvil at approx. 250 lb here in S. Colorado that is up for sale.  Edges were rough but it appeared intact ( no broken or cracked horn or heel). It will soon be up for sale at auction for a ranch dispersal.  One note on the forge, the mfg co is spelled Naudain not naudin.

Edited by hikeordie
correct previous info
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19 minutes ago, hikeordie said:

Thanks for the information.  I will try to post a photo soon and will also check out the army field manual and post results of my search.  I also acquired a 120 lb Fulton cast steel anvil in near pristine condition which were made by the Columbia Hardware Co. for Sears in the early 1920's.  Great find.  I also saw a Peter Wright anvil at approx. 250 lb here in S. Colorado that is up for sale.  Edges were rough but it appeared intact ( no broken or cracked horn or heel). It will soon be up for sale at auction for a ranch dispersal.

You're welcome. I hope that it helps you determine the forge's history. And the Fulton anvil sounds like an excellent find.

Steamboat

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33 minutes ago, hikeordie said:

Here are a couple od pictures of the Naudain Forge.

It does look different from the one in the manual referenced above. Probably/possibly a manufacture date of 1946.

Also check out this older topic, which might have some useful information or contacts:

http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/28685-portable-blacksmith-forge-military-circa-ww-i/

Steamboat

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Also, you may want to check with the Maryland Historical Society. It appears that they may have some records relating to the Naudain Manufacturing Company (Box 103, Folder 5). Check the list on their website for their Maryland WWII Records,1945-1965, MS. 2010. Unless it's just a coincidence, I'm just assuming that it's probably the same company as the one stamped on the forge.

http://www.mdhs.org/findingaid/maryland-world-war-ii-records-1945-1965-ms-2010

Steamboat

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Thanks for the added info, There were probably more than one contract awarded to manufacture forges for the military.  The one shown in the other I Forge Iron posting is different from mine and the ones shown in the manual.  My neighbor who is a korean war veteran worked in supply and says that the calvaray  probably us the lighter more portable aluminium units.  I will check the Maryland site also.

Hikeordie

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