Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Fork forging techniques


Recommended Posts

I'd like to forge a large, two-pronged fork and was wondering what techniques you'r recommend. The standard method seems to be to split a larger piece of steel and socket it at the base. This may be a little impractical for one with large prongs like this so I was wondering if there are any techniques out there for making forks? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First decide how large the fork tines are to be. now, simply bend a loop at teh end of the bar so the free end overlaps the standing part. forge weld it where it lap. Now you have a bar with a welded loop, picture an eye bolt but welded. Next is to straighten the loop so it's even and cut the loop on a line with the shaft. This gives you an unsharened fork with a round profile on the tines. Forge the tines to the shape you want.

 

I'm on a new computer and learning new web browsing software or I'd post a sketch. However if you take a piece of string and loop one end around and lay it over the standing part, you'll  have a good representation of what I'm talking about.

 

Frosty the Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Frosty, I've got it! Should be an interesting project to do! It's going to be a large hay-sized fork. Perhaps I should make a torch to go with it in case of an angry mob?

 

A hay fork eh? Make it a double loop and have a 4 tined fork. If you're making your fork to march on Washington then YES, make the torch, it's part of the statement.

 

If not, <sigh> you need the torch, forks and torches go together. It's TRADITIONAL. (Thus, invoking the sacred word it's now  imperative you make a torch to go with!)

 

Frosty the Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure about the hay-fork tradition in Alaska Frosty, but English ones (and the long-handled pitching forks too) only have two tines, four tines are on mucking forks here - and I do mean forks not cromes.

 

 

 

Gundog, think about where the strain will be put on the fork; my guess is that this will be where the tines come into the neck i.e. the junction between socket and tines. For that reason I would favour a forging of the fork from a single piece of substantial flat stock (tool steel if you want elegance), so enabling tines and socket to be from one piece and - importantly - the neck to be substantial enough to bear the loads it will have too. Dont forget to punch your nail-hole through the socket before you roll it over.

 

 

 

I have seen an alternative to the socket a few times, but only on hay-forks not on pitching forks. This is a long pointed tang coming straight from the neck that goes through a collar / ferrule into the shaft. I have not used this method on such a fork but have used it elsewhere and it is very strong; however... my guess is that the reason it was not used on pitching forks was because they flexed and any movement of the shaft itself would lead such a fitting to loosen, whereas the far more rigid short shaft on a hay-fork would hardly flex at all, so it would be unlikely to loosen.

 

 

 

If you do choose the tanged style, remember two things: 1) To put the ferrule on the shaft before you start fitting the head; 2) To use a longer shaft than necessary so that when you hammer it home you can trim it neatly and avoid future splits at the end. Only a real idiot would make these mistakes, twice... <_<

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my large fork was done starting with one long piece and two short pieces.  Place one short one on either side of the large one justified so that all the ends are ligned up. Forge weld the end and draw a short "ornamental" taper. Then heat and bend the short lengths around so they point down and tape/form them to your liking.

 

Now as this was an ornamental toasting fork I actually used a forge welded up basket for the center long piece and forge welded on the tines and bent them around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...