gkhan

Acme Anvil - Wanting opinions

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I have run into a widow lady who lives near me (Houston, TX) that has the attached anvil. It is an Acme (Trenton version?) that weighs 156 pounds per the stamp on the foot under the horn. The serial number next to it is 133322 as best that I can tell. I looked it over and it looks to be in pretty good shape. It has been sitting outside for years. The anvil is welded to the plate (3/8” think circle on some flame cut legs). The welds look like they would be easy to grind away to release the anvil. I told her I would ask around to see if anyone is interested. If it would have been 100 or 300 pounds, I might have considered it for myself but I have a nice 185 pound PW that I really like. The white paper is a 8.5 x 11 sheet for size reference. What would be a reasonable value? What would be the estimated age?

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If it is a Trenton serial #, it was from 1915. The only ACME serial # that I have found, so far, in Anvils In America is # 66690 and shows 1907 as manufacture date. ACME was the Sears & Roebuck trademark used on there anvils for many years, according to AIA. Hope that helps. :)

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I had thought I read somewhere that Trenton actually made anvils for Sears (as did HB) and that those that were Trenton (Acme) products were stamped with a serial number on the foot whereas the HBs had no serial numbers.

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I never knew ACME actually made anvils, Does it say ACME on the other side?
I always thought it was a fictional Wile E. Coyote thing!
Now I really kind of wish I had one! :rolleyes:

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Makes me wish I was closer, I'd go grab it. Is the face starting to delaminate on the back edge there? Up here in WI, you could get about $300 for it.

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This is a clip from the picture on the side. The best I can tell is it says ACME with RJK(?) above it. It looked like someone has stamped it or something. There is also some symbol below it. I only had a few minutes to look at the thing and snap a couple of pictures.

I also noticed the plate on the heel that looks like it is de-laminating. It didn't look like the gap was more than a fingernail deep.

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Also, looking throught the hardie and pritchel, you could not see a defining layer or separation. I didn't hit it with a hammer. I told the lady that I really wished it had not been welded to the plate.

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Probably not delaminating but only the weld seam that wasn't dressed all the way as these were not real high end things.

If I had a student needing an anvil I'd suggest he be willing to go $2 a pound. Welding to that disk does cut the price a bit as it will have to be removed to be used---so $300 would be a reasonable top offer IMO and $200 an "out the door by the end of the day" price.

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Just thought I'd post this for historical interest.
Years ago I bought a repro of a 1908 Sears Roebuck catalogue because our house was built in 1908 and my wife and I thought it would be interesting to see what was available at that time.

Here is a page from the blacksmithing section ... it almost made me cry.

Yup ... you're reading it right ... Acme anvils sold for 15 cents per pound - this sale ad was for 9.5 cents per pound. Now I know times and costs are all relative, but to hear about anvils selling for 15 cents per pound at any time is still mind-boggling.

On other pages, Sears sold complete home blacksmithing kits including a small forge, anvil and a set of tools for $45.00.

I want a time machine !!!

Sam
Hamilton, ON.

One other thing ... All those years watching Bugs Bunny cartoons and I've just realized that all the times Wille E. Coyote was mail-ordering stuff to make his traps, he was ordering from Sears Roebuck (... they were the only company carrying Acme anvils).

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Thanks for the response and information from the Sears Roebuck catalog. I intend to get back wtih her in a week or so about the anvil. I will show her what I have learned here. If she is receptive, I may make an offer for the anvil even though I do not need it.

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''I want a time machine!!!''


Average wage in 1908.........22 cents an hour.... :( ...I'm with you though, I'd take my chances.....By the time you could invest a few bucks in Microsoft you'd only be 80 or so..... :D

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Thanks for the response and information from the Sears Roebuck catalog. I intend to get back wtih her in a week or so about the anvil. I will show her what I have learned here. If she is receptive, I may make an offer for the anvil even though I do not need it.


It would be great blacksmith karma if you can buy it and pass it on to a beginning smith at a fair price.
That and it would be a really decent, upstanding thing to do.
You could become some young smith's mentor.
Good luck.
Sam.

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Of course that multiplier doesn't work for everything eg look at the price of gold then and now.

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