Another FrankenBurner

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About Another FrankenBurner

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Boise, Idaho
  • Interests
    Tinkering, making things, learning, diagnosing, math/science, programming, cad, CNC, 3D printing, machining, casting, forging, welding, carving.

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  1. Another FrankenBurner

    3D printed plastic burner experiments (photo heavy)

    Based on what you said, I know we did it wrong. We are changing the feed system. I suspect you are exactly correct about what I am seeing. Sprued from one end and the ribs freezing before the lower portion would explain where I am seeing the porosity problems.
  2. Another FrankenBurner

    3D printed plastic burner experiments (photo heavy)

    I'm glad you both like them. It is exciting. I think I have the inducer ratio's tuned in to a point I am happy. I have scaled to the 3/8" and the 3/4" with the exact same ratios and they both do very well. More air can be induced but then the mix tube velocity starts to scream and the induction volume and fuel volume curves don't match as well. I think I have found a nice balance for a stable, well ranged, versatile burner. The gentle nudges in Burners 101 were not lost on me, I will be scaling to the 1/4", just for Mikey. I will have to change up the jet assembly for that small. I am also starting to tinker in the NARB side of things. I am as excited about playing with NARBs as I was about playing with inducers. I know almost nothing about their dynamics and look forward to becoming acquainted. Catchy name? I kind of like Frosty's "Twisted Gizmo." Others have referred to them as vortex injectors or vortex inducers. I'm up for suggestions, I didn't put much mind to it. We are getting close to aluminum inducers. A few poured yesterday are now functioning burners. Just ugly. One total failure is now a burner shaped candle holder. Big flames coming out of that one. I don't have any pictures of the sprues and the porosity problems currently, but I will get some. I appreciate the help. We are going to get some proper investment so that we can know how it functions and what we are aiming for with the DIY investment experiments.
  3. Another FrankenBurner

    Forges 101

    I am thankful for the safety first concerns of the folks on these threads. It's a dangerous hobby.
  4. Another FrankenBurner

    Forges 101

    I hadn't even thought about that Frosty. Modern refrigerants are not CFC's, phaseout in 1996. HCFC's are in the process of being phased out, 90% phaseout in 2015, full phaseout in 2020. If you are wanting to stay away from chlorine, you could get an evacuated cylinder from an HFC. R134a(blue), R404a(orange), or R410a(pink) are the common ones. R410a is higher pressure so the cylinders may be thicker walled but I am not positive on that. I will still use the same safety precautions with these cylinders.
  5. Another FrankenBurner

    3D printed plastic burner experiments (photo heavy)

    Another fun Saturday. We finally played with the 3/4 burner. He ended up getting the 045 jet. This flame is at 4 psi and the nozzle ends at 1.5 inch. It's a big slow flame. The orange is from the kast o lite nozzle. . Here is 10 psi: Here is the 3/4 guy: It still needs some tinkering, more nozzle experiments, and the mix tube is too long. When the nozzle matches the inducer, the final FAM stream is slowed, the jet size is increased, and the induction volume curve matches the fuel volume curve through fuel pressure range. We 3D printed a thin form for the kast o lite to make this nozzle. A 1:12 taper after a step. We made 4 more flasks and 3D printed bottoms which include the funnel/sprues for the inducer. We had obtained a dilapidated larger kiln and rebuilt it, so today we poured 5 experimental investment mix flasks. We ran the furnace with the ugly salvaged 1/2 inch burner from the last pour. We are happy with how it runs. We have pulled out working burners but they are not good enough yet. Investment still needs work. The burners have porosity problems. A good learning day.
  6. Another FrankenBurner

    Naturally Aspirated Ribbon Burner. Photo heavy.

    Isn't that a function of final FAM velocity? I have seen commercial gunned ribbon burners with very small ports(1/32 of an inch) which flash into the plenum if the fan doesn't run.
  7. Another FrankenBurner

    Forges 101

    While I am not advising anyone of anything here, especially not burning refrigerant and huffing it, some of the folks in the HVAC profession have burned lots of refrigerant and "manned" through it to finish the job. I personally know a couple of those... people and they are still with us. I had studied burned refrigerant, worried of killing myself at work. It sounds like it is highly unlikely that phosgene gas will be produced by burning refrigerant. The article stated that hydrofluoric acid and if the refrigerant contains chlorine, hydrochloric acid are what give the unpleasant breath. Along with a host of other nasties. I had also read that phosgene has a sweet, not unpleasant odor and that if you get enough of a dose to smell it, get your affairs in order. I don't know how much of it is true though, it is hard to wade through the old wives tales and find a definitive answer. I avoid it through proper practices. I always blow the cans out with air and make the initial cuts outside. Though, as Charles R. Stevens stated, if you want complete avoidance, the disposable helium cans are pretty much the same thing. When it comes to safety, over reacting is better then under reacting.
  8. Another FrankenBurner

    Forges 101

    A mowed lawn... You know, I don't remember. It has been a long while since I have accidentally burned refrigerant. It is unpleasant enough that you immediately know to stop what you are doing and leave the area. The air blown through the can seems to take care of it though. I use the jugs for lots of stuff and have cut open dozens of them.
  9. Another FrankenBurner

    3D printed plastic burner experiments (photo heavy)

    I was aware of the machinable wax filament. I have read it is difficult to use. I would have to change the firmware on my machine to lower the minimum print temperature, convert to a direct extruder system instead of the Bowden system and it sounds like a fight with bed adhesion. I might look into another machine as I still like the idea of using it. I had thought to do a silicone mold to make wax forms but I didn't think I could with this design. I don't know much about silicone molds. There is a large void in the middle of the inducers so I don't know how I would get the print and the waxes out of the mold. I would like to figure it out so that I don't have to reprint it each time but can't think of how to do it. I don't suspect the investment is cracking due to expansion. Once we started using the flask, the cast comes out of burnout without cracks. The last one was cracked by the vacuum I suspect. We are tinkerers and so we are still playing with DIY investments which is probably the problem. We are also messing with the burnout schedule. When we are tired of failing, we will get some proper investment and follow it's instructions. I don't think we are sucking investment into the print like I originally worried about. To test though, we have an investment made which we pulled a deep vacuum on for several minutes. We are going to burn it out and break the mold apart to see if there is any evidence of it. I do like the idea of using shellac to smooth the print though. The shellac will burnout ok without adding problems? Thank you for the casting advice. It is fun stuff. Our favorite part is the moment of truth. All that work buried in an investment and you don't know if it was successful. We now have a larger kiln and several flasks made up so we can start doing multiple experiments in one go. That should speed things up.
  10. Another FrankenBurner

    Forges 101

    I always blow air through the can as described above, before cutting. No problems that way. If you plasma cut with residual refrigerant in the can, it is unpleasant in a lungs and eyes burning kind of way. I couldn't help but point out the article. I did read it thoroughly, good history. No need for sabre-rattling.
  11. Another FrankenBurner

    Forges 101

    I had to look up saber saws as I couldn't remember which reciprocating saw that was. I found this page on the difference between the sabre saw and the jigsaw. I thought I'd share because one sentence made me laugh: "Thus, you still hear plenty of ‘older generations’ referring to contemporary jigsaws as saber saws." They are great for cutting. I use a plasma cutter for cutting the cans. Though, tools are one of my vices.
  12. Another FrankenBurner

    Forges 101

    I use compressed air to verify a clean can. Open the valve first and make sure there is no pressure. The jug should have been evacuated. There is a safety blow disc at the top of the refrigerant jugs which is thinner than the can walls. I use a center punch to pop a hole in it. Then I push compressed air into the hole and let it blow out the valve for 5 seconds or so. Very easy and quick.
  13. Another FrankenBurner

    3D printed plastic burner experiments (photo heavy)

    Yes, PLA burnout. Our investment withstood the burn out, it was inspected out of the kiln. I heard it crack when vacuum was applied. We are adding a bit more head to the investment the next go around, it was less then 3/8 inch thick. Do you turn on the vacuum prior to pouring or after? I have read people do both ways but without explaining reasoning one way or the other.
  14. Another FrankenBurner

    Forges 101

    There was talk of baking cake in the 3d printed burner thread. Also, some Unabomber grammar talk along with it. Having cake and eating it too.
  15. Another FrankenBurner

    3D printed plastic burner experiments (photo heavy)

    The flask was at 600°C (1100°F). We are experimenting with DIY investments. That is probably still the problem. Just to specify, by full vacuum, do you mean 29+ inches mercury? We are using a healthy vacuum pump and I could not find much information on the commercial vacuum table capabilities.