Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Considering a 15 or 25 Kw, but.....


Recommended Posts

Hi guys. My business could definately benefit from having an induction forge. Waiting for my coal or even propane forges to come up to speed is something I could do without.
Here's my situation; I have a medical device implanted in my abdomen that's basically a pain medicine pump. It pumps medication into my spinal column 24/7 in tiny amounts (broke my back in a skiing accident in 93). It's ok to use around microwaves like those found in the home kitchen, and can even handle
most MRI machines. If the machine does affect the pump, it's only that it shuts off the little motor inside the infusion pump until the MRI is shut off, then it restarts. With this in mind, I'm fairly confident that I'd have no problems using the induction forge. At the same time however I want to be as safe as possible, and I'm wondering if having some sort of shield (lead?) between me and the forge may help matters?
I've also seen lined vests that some of the medical personal wear to protect themselves against differient forms of radiation. Anyone have any experience along the lines of what I'm asking?
Many thanks!
Robert

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Medical questions are best directed toward your doctors. They practice medicine.
Do not expect an answer unless they can document it in a book (and cover their backside).

Disclaimer:
WE ARE blacksmiths, farriers, welders, machinists, knife makers, sculptors, etc. As we are not licensed doctors so we can only make suggestions, make a guess, etc.to give you a place to start your quest for additional information. In your quest do not overlook the veterinarians, or vet research centers. They are doctors also, but with different limitations on their field of medicine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right, exactly guys, thanks. I'm in contact with him (doctor) and he wanted me to find out if there was anyone else in the same situation that was doing ok. He doesn't see a problem. I can get around microwaves and MRI's without a problem either. Not looking for a final answer in any one place, but was wanting to see if there might be anyone out there in the same boat. Ya never know.
I really appreciate the answers, and Monster, you ARE the smartest blacksmith I know!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Right, exactly guys, thanks. I'm in contact with him (doctor) and he wanted me to find out if there was anyone else in the same situation that was doing ok. He doesn't see a problem. I can get around microwaves and MRI's without a problem either. Not looking for a final answer in any one place, but was wanting to see if there might be anyone out there in the same boat. Ya never know.
I really appreciate the answers, and Monster, you ARE the smartest blacksmith I know!!!


After extensive checking with the technical staff of the company that manufacturers the infusion pump I use, their opinion was that it would be ok to use, but that there could be a hazzard to the pump motor if stood by it for any length of time.
Therefore I've decided to wait on getting an induction forge until either my pump is removed (which may be within a couple of years,) or I hire someone to take over my forging work, while I concentrate on fit and finish.
I want to thank those that were interested in reading the forum, plus extend my gratitude
to those that provided their opinions.
Robert Hensarling
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hi guys. My business could definately benefit from having an induction forge. Waiting for my coal or even propane forges to come up to speed is something I could do without.
Here's my situation; I have a medical device implanted in my abdomen that's basically a pain medicine pump. It pumps medication into my spinal column 24/7 in tiny amounts (broke my back in a skiing accident in 93). It's ok to use around microwaves like those found in the home kitchen, and can even handle
most MRI machines. If the machine does affect the pump, it's only that it shuts off the little motor inside the infusion pump until the MRI is shut off, then it restarts. With this in mind, I'm fairly confident that I'd have no problems using the induction forge. At the same time however I want to be as safe as possible, and I'm wondering if having some sort of shield (lead?) between me and the forge may help matters?
I've also seen lined vests that some of the medical personal wear to protect themselves against differient forms of radiation. Anyone have any experience along the lines of what I'm asking?
Many thanks!
Robert


Robert, I have a few suggestions. First off, you were right to consult with the people who make the pain med pump- if anyone can give you a certain answer, it's them.

Some electric/electronic devices put out more or different kinds of electromagnetic fields than others, and no one has put forth the effort to make a chart. But there are some things you can do, although I would ask you to check with the manufacturer of the pain med pump first.
:
1. Get a gauss meter, which measures the field that's put out by many electric/electronic devices. It won't tell you for certain whether your pump will react to a particular induction oven or other device, but it will tell you something about the strength of the field of the induction oven as opposed to the fields of everyday electric/electronic devices that you know you can safely use, and that comparison could be an indicator of whether it will affect the pump.

2. Get a cheap little A.M. radio, and adjust the tuner so it's not on any particular station- so all you hear coming out of the speaker is static. Then go around your house with the radio near your belly, and approach the electric/electronic devices that you normally use, such as the toaster, electric oven, electric stove, television, DVD player, electric shaver, (and so on), with each of those devices turned on, and get as close to them as you are when you use them, and see if you hear any difference in the static that's coming out of the radio. You see, the radio antenna picks up on more than just radio waves- it also picks up on lots of the electromagnetic "garbage" fields that are put out by the devices that you use every day. Then approach an electric heat treating oven that is turned on, and see whether the static coming from your radio is louder or not as loud as it is when you're near the electric/electronic devices that you know are ok for you to use.

One last suggestion: ask the pain med pump manufacturer these questions: "If my being near an electric device shuts off the pain med pump is there any way for me to tell that it's off other than when I start feeling the pain, and will it reset itself and come back on, or will it be broken?"
Good luck!
David Ab
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can the pump be put into a metal mesh bag to limit EM interference?

Can the pump be worn on a different part of the body (back instead of front) so it is further from the EM source?

Feedback from the manufacturer is important. Maybe they can work with you and someone with an induction setup to do some simple testing.

Best of luck getting your answers.

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...